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Questions tagged [comparative]

The form of an adjective or adverb used to compare two or more things. English comparatives are formed with the suffixes -er/-est or the words more/most.

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Single word for 'less expensive' [closed]

Is there a good single word for 'less expensive'? I often see people using 'cheap' to describe it, but I feel it does not express the intention. For example, I prefer to say 'Flight tickets are less ...
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Comparative or superlative adjective?

I think it is best not to be impolite. Is the above sentence fine, or should it have better instead of best in it?
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75 views

is ‘fine’ in the sense ‘of very good quality’ gradable? [closed]

Fine in the sense of very good quality seems to be an absolute adjective, and since absolute adjectives are not gradable, so I am wondering if this principle applies to fine in the sense ‘of very good ...
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“More Bored” Vs “Boreder”

I have a question about comparative adjectives. I read that if an adjective has only one syllable we write its comparative form as: adjective + er, e.g. bigger and if an adjective has more than two ...
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Confusing Comparatives (as few ~ as, as many ~ as)

I am very confused with the following sentences and I would like to ask you all what you think. I have as many books as you do. This means, if you have 6 books, I have 6 books too. I get this. Then ...
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75 views

A question about comparative clauses

In my opinion, the second part of a comparative clause should be a complete sentence. But I'm always confused by some comparative clauses as some clauses are incomplete. For example, are both the ...
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Comparing figures [duplicate]

We use the adjectives: 1. big/large/great - small 2. high/great - low 3. more - less when comparing figures; for example: The number of people in New York is higher/bigger/larger/greater ...
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The usage of 'a' in front of a comparative

Is the below sentence correct? I'm not sure if adding an 'a' in front of 'more' is OK. To enable a more accurate spatial normalization process, manual re-orientation and positioning of the PET ...
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1answer
270 views

The largest, greatest, highest or biggest number of . .

I'm not a native speaker, and my teacher taught me to use "the biggest number of . . ." when comparing amounts of some things, but I've checked it in google which seems like "the largest, the greatest,...
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Is it fine to use “the second largest” when comparing 3 things

Let's say, if there were 4 cities, A, B, C and D 1,000 people live in city A. 2,000 people live in city B. 3,000 people live in city C. 4,000 people live in city D. - The second ...
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1answer
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Comparatives and superlatives for the word “statistic”

Let's say, there was a bar chart giving 2 different pieces of data for 3 groups. - Monkeys was the ______________ statistic. If you needed to complete the sentence above with a superlative ...
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Saying the value is in between the other 2 values

I'm preparing for Ielts test. Its writing part is the most difficult for me. So far, I'm learning about comparative between numbers, and I stuck. Let's say, there was a given bar chart giving 3 ...
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Is it correct to say “my oldest child” when you have only two children?

I remember "oldest" child is more correctly used when you have more than two children - e.g. my older child (assumption that there are only two children); my oldest child (assumption that there are at ...
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1answer
162 views

“leave immediately, sooner if possible”

In the series Shameless.US, S06E10, an actress utters "leave immediately, sooner if possible". Is this idiomatic? I'd like to know why sooner refers to.
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1answer
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Which is right? "Ambitious students are more likely to succeed than are those with little ambition / than those with little ambition

Which is right? "Ambitious students are more likely to succeed than are those with little ambition" or "Ambitious students are more likely to succeed than those with little ambition"
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Why can 'lower' be a verb but 'higher/upper' cannot?

The title is basically my question. The word lower can be a comparative form of low as an adjective, but it can also be a verb. However, the antonym of the word such as higher or upper cannot be used ...
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As much as with verb [closed]

I was wondering how sentences should be formed when comparing things/actions using "as much as". In this example,I am comparing "eating food" and "drinking water". But I am not sure which one I can ...
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Why is it unnatural to say “He is as clever as rude”?

(1) He is more clever than rude. (2) ??He is as clever as rude. I've learned (1) is natural and that (2) isn't. (1) means "He is clever rather than rude". Then, why can't (2) mean (2b)? (2b)...
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Usage of “elder” and “eldest” in degrees of comparison

If one has two elder brothers, is it OK to say "My eldest brother is this and the second eldest is that"?
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1answer
354 views

What part of speech is 'better' in the following sentence?

What part of speech is better in the following sentence? Is it an adverb because it modifies the verb expect? Is it an abstract noun because it is an “intangible concept such as an emotion, a feeling, ...
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3answers
92 views

The use of superlative as in “the poorest half”

I saw the phrase "poorest half of the population." Is superlative always used with "half"? Is "poorer half" okay? Do you also say the "richest half"?
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Stays (more) fresh (for longer)

My wife just said "stays more fresh for longer", which sounded double to me. But I don't know how to actually say it without being double. When you put something in the fridge it stays... more fresh....
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What is the comparative of “I am broke”?

I am broke In slang it means to be without money, but how would I say (facetiously) that my economic situation is worse today? a. I am broker today b. I am more broke today Solution b) ...
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79 views

Starting sentence with More

I'm going to write and academic paper and I want to know if this syntax is correct or not? More item A looks like item B, it would be more leakage of information.
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1k views

Is it incorrect to use “more gentle”?

Most dictionaries list "gentler" as the comparative form of "gentle", but "more gentle" also sounds correct. According to this forum post, it is.
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Late “latter” last

PREMISE: I am not asking about the difference in meaning or usage between latter and later; it is, therefore, not a duplicate of the older question: what is the difference between later and latter? ...
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“More thicker hair”? Is it correct to use 'more' with comparative adjectives?

I was watching a YouTube video the other day and I found a sentence that intrigued me. The woman, Jessica Vill, was talking about her wig collection and when describing one of the wigs she said ...
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Can I say “I have two pens less”, and “I have two dollars less”? [closed]

There were 50 students in class. The teacher gave out 50 pens to the students (the students got a total of 50 pens). The teacher gave 50 pens to every student (every student got fifty pens each). ...
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1answer
729 views

'as much as' VS 'more than'

Please, help me. I am so confused with my English task. Very few books are read ___ Harry Potter by children. a) as much as b) more than c) the most   Very few channels are watched ...
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“…nicer than any other…” vs “…as nice as any other…”

On a practice test, this sentence was given with the instructions to select the correct version: The English teacher, Mrs. Jensen, is nicer than any teacher in the whole school. This is obviously ...
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336 views

Weaker or more weakly [closed]

I often wondered how a comparative adverb was supposed to be written. If we use strong as an example, I wondered if strongly would become strongerly when in comparative. I learned that it was not ...
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1answer
105 views

Idiomatic way of implying “by a multiplicative factor”

I was told that saying A equals B within a factor C is not correct. Is it true? My interlocutor, who is not a native anglophone, told me that "within" cannot be used in such a way, arguing that "[....
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Word Order and Comparative

Consider the different locations of the subject, adjective, and conjunction in the following sentences. A boy as trim as Bob should be a fast runner. As trim a boy as Bob should be a fast ...
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“to reduce the probabilities of receiving inferior products than expected” is okay to use?

Having read the sentence In order to reduce the probabilities of receiving inferior products than expected, the buyers would rather choose products by their origins the first part appeared weird to ...
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How to write comparative sentences?

I have some problem in comparative sentence. For example: In lower layer PS=10% In upper layer PS=5% For this I wrote the sentence as below: In lower layer PS is greater than upper ...
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1answer
44 views

few/fewer (Fewer birds came this year.) [closed]

Fewer birds came this year. Does the above sentence say that more birds came last year than this year? Could someone please explain whether the comparative adjective,'fewer' actually describes 'this ...
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What is the scope of “more” when making a list of comparatives?

Lets assume I have an object X of which I want to say (1) it's more important than Y and (2) it's smaller than Y (Y is left implicit in the examples.) If I say X is more important before saying X is ...
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Small and Big/As small as the bigger

Have a look at this passage: Theorem 1 and also the other author's result suggest that to have topological rigidity, it is necessary to require the manifold to be contained in a geodesic ball, ...
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Is “not at all very good” correct usage?

When I submitted my Sociology M.Phil study proposal, the adviser wrote in the comments section: Very good in theory, not at all very good in practice. That sounds odd. What creates dissonance is ...
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X is farther than Y?

Can the word farther be used to compare the distance (from the speaker) of two places without adding 'away' and/or 'from here'. e.g. "New York is farther than Los Angeles" ?
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“My older brother is called John” vs. “my elder brother is called John” [duplicate]

I don't know which one is correct: My older brother is called John My elder brother is called John.
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1answer
1k views

Idiom for as flat as [closed]

Could someone please show me any word or phrase that could fit with as flat as _______ . Grammar is important.
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257 views

Preference of “cheaper and more efficient” over “more efficient and cheaper”

Would "cheaper and more efficient" be ever so slightly preferred over "more efficient and cheaper"? The same goes with "more", and any other pair/group of comparatives, of which one uses "more" or "...
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1answer
111 views

Is “healthierly” a word? As in “I've been eating healthierly lately” [closed]

I've been hearing people say: I've been eating healthier lately. This sounds like bad grammar to me. The word "healthier" is an adjective, so it should modify a noun, but in this sentence, the ...
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How usual are the comparative sentences like “the number of those under 6 years of age is higher than of those over 70”

I found the following sentences in Corpus of Contemporary American English. (1)the number of those under 6 years of age is higher than of those over 70. (2)the population density of Nuer ...
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What is the comparative form of “tense”?

According to Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary and Macmillian English Dictionary, the comparative form of "tense" should be "tenser", but I find such an example in Oxford Dictionary: "The ...
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2answers
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What do “the more” and “the less” modify in “The more our knowledge of things is certain and particular, the less it is possible for us to feign”?

The following is an excerpt from The Young Spinoza: A Metaphysician in the Making. (1) The more our knowledge of things is certain and particular, the less it is possible for us to feign; What do ...
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Question about “the + comparative ~ , the + comparative” [grammar]

I want to use "[the] + [comparative] + [S V] , [the] + [comparative] + [S V]" sentence. The following equations are correct? The shorter length of a wireless link that forms between two antennas is, ...
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repeating transitive verbs when comparing with “than”

When we compare things with "than" using transitive verbs, should we repeat the verbs? For example, which of the following is correct or preferred? We grant the former more scientific weight than ...
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328 views

The precise meaning of “to have something more to do with somebody/something”?

There are other questions about the meaning of "to have something to do with somebody/something". My question here is about "to have something more to do with somebody/something". There is a sense of ...