Questions tagged [clipping]

Questions about words formed by the loss or omission of sounds or syllables from a longer word, usually but not always from its end; also known as truncation, shortening, apocope, and apocopation. Examples include: memo from memorandum, ad and advert from advertisement, doc from doctor, fax from facsimile, gator from alligator, coon from raccoon, phone from telephone, flu from influenza, and fancy from fantasy.

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What is the name for the transformation of "good on you" to "onya"?

In Australian slang, there is a word "Onya" which is used in the exact same way as "Good on you". What transformations have taken place in the formation of this slang? I'm finding ...
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1 vote
1 answer
317 views

Is using bike word to address a motorcycle correct?

I have used the word 'bike' to address motorcycle in past. In recent years though, I noticed that this word is being used more for a bicycle than for a motorcycle. Since then I just 'assumed' that it ...
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-1 votes
1 answer
72 views

Is "proof" an acceptable synonym for "proofread"? [closed]

I did not find "proofread" as a synonym when I looked up "proof", and this would lead me to think not. But I do like to shorten the word -- will people understand me if I do? At https://www....
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14 votes
10 answers
17k views

Do native English speakers use the word 'notif' to mean ‘notification’ or ‘alert’?

This question is quite subjective as it probably depends on where you live. I was wondering whether the shortened version of notification — “notif.” — was used in spoken language. In French we tend to ...
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27 votes
3 answers
5k views

The balled (headed) eagle?

Now I observe you staring upward and puzzling your wits to guess what great bird it is you see wheeling aloft over our heads. That, Sir, is the type, symbol, and adopted emblem of our nation, the BALD ...
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1 vote
3 answers
203 views

One word for heavily impacts? [closed]

Understanding social context 'heavily impacts' our connection to the characters. Need to cut this sentence down and heavily impacts is a bit clunky!
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3 votes
0 answers
134 views

Omitting the auxiliary verb in short answers or titles [duplicate]

Please help me in this. what do we call the composition of the short sentence below, where there's no auxiliary verb: Request approved. (subject + past participle) and which of the following gives ...
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2 votes
3 answers
6k views

As a shortening of "bourgeois", is "bougie" or "bourgie" correct?

Bougie or bourgie is used as a shortened, informal version of bourgeois used in African American Vernacular English. For example: The car he drives is indicative of his [bougie | bourgie] lifestyle....
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  • 129
2 votes
1 answer
923 views

Word to describe removal of prefix

I am describing a two-way process using "prefix" as a verb: The first action is that of adding a prefix to something. The second is the act of removing that same prefix. If I am describing the first ...
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  • 350
22 votes
1 answer
9k views

Why is "fridge" spelt with a 'd' but "refrigeration" spelt without one?

The question is in the title, why does the word, refrigeration not have a 'd' in it when fridge does?
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  • 493
4 votes
1 answer
4k views

Why is "ammunition" shortened to "ammo" and not "ammu"?

According to Etymonline, ammo has been used as a shortened form of ammunition since 1917. Why does the shortened version end in o instead of u? The only reason I can think of is that it matches other ...
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9 votes
1 answer
3k views

Why is "coon" a word?

The word formation process that yielded the word coon is called (fore-)clipping: raccoon > coon Other examples of fore-clipping include: bot (robot), chute (parachute), roach (cockroach), coon (...
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9 votes
6 answers
4k views

When did "phone" become accepted as its own word?

In older print publications, I have come across telephone shortened to 'phone, with an apostrophe to mark where the beginning of the word had been omitted. Now, however, phone does not need an ...
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25 votes
4 answers
6k views

Is IOU an abbreviation, an acronym, or an initialism?

IOU stands for I owe you and we pronounce each letter separately. But how do we classify that construction"? abbreviation: a shortened form of a word or phrase acronym: an abbreviation formed from ...
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7 votes
3 answers
4k views

Can "sitcom" be considered an "acronym"? A Syllabic Acronym? Or a Hybrid Acronym?

ACRONYM - An abbreviation formed from the initial letters of other words and pronounced as a word http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/acronym Much has been written about acronyms and ...
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3 votes
3 answers
176 views

Can the shortening of proper nouns, such as "The Nuge", be considered a type of elision?

The earliest example that comes to mind is the shortening of the name Ted Nugent as The Nuge. To be clear, I'm less interested in the dropping of syllables at the end of his name, and more interested ...
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76 votes
11 answers
15k views

Why is "distro", rather than "distri", short for "distribution" in Linux world?

Why is distro, rather than distri, short for distribution in Linux world?
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  • 2,628
1 vote
2 answers
223 views

What does “Logitem” mean on many freightliners?

What does Logitem mean that I see on the sides of many passing freightliners? I wonder wether it’s a kind of clipping combining logistic with item. I'm not a native speaker but I love English.
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4 votes
5 answers
344 views

Name for an inexact abbreviation

What is the name for a word that is shortened, but done somewhat incorrectly? As an example, the word distro is shortened from the word distribution, but with the trailing i changed to an o. ...
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