Questions tagged [class-based-usage]

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1
vote
4answers
172 views

Sailor, but of rivers

I'm looking for a word similar to 'sailor' but not of the oceans (i.e rivers). Sailors are assumed to be 'people of the high seas' etc, which isn't what I'm after - I need smaller bodies of water. ...
3
votes
1answer
89 views

What's a good way to describe the professional occupation of someone who is a street hustler, without using derogatory terms?

I am filling in a form for someone who basically does a variety of odd jobs to make a living, including reselling items, but "Sales" is not really an accurate way to describe their occupation. I am ...
0
votes
1answer
546 views

Why is “dare” used in “One of you dare not fight with him”?

The sentence is : One of you dare not fight with him. One of you dares not fight with him. I have read that we should use singular verb with "one of +plural noun+ singular verb" but here dares is ...
2
votes
3answers
261 views

Two synonyms each of Saxon and French origin where the Saxon word is “classier” [closed]

To clarify the title, i am looking for two words in the English vocabulary. Normally in English words of French origin are seen as fancier and used by intelligent and upper class people. But is there ...
0
votes
1answer
143 views

Plural word with or without 's' [duplicate]

Can 'medicines' be used the same as 'medicine'? When someone places two subscriptions, did they buy medicine or medicines?
1
vote
0answers
235 views

Words to differentiate between Class and Wealth

While there are many answers differentiating between class in a moral sense, (e.g. "Look at Johnny, cavorting with clowns. He truly has no class.") and wealth (see here, I can't find any between class ...
7
votes
2answers
987 views

Can your use of Latin-derived words indicate your social class?

It is certainly true that educational level and social position usually walk together in most societies. Not considering that, however, and based only on how often one uses Graeco-Latin versus Anglo-...
0
votes
0answers
43 views

which one is correct sentence? [duplicate]

1.New employee is going to join on Sunday. 2.New employee is joining on Sunday. 3.New employee will join on Sunday. 4.New employee joins on Sunday. Can you please let me know which sentence i should ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

What is the difference between “Have got sb by the balls” and “Sb being over a barrel” in describing somebody in predicament?

I found two intriguing idioms in a pair in the following sentence of Jeffery Archer’s “The Forth Estate” (page 592) that I came to the last part at length. A media mogul, Dick Armstrong (seemingly ...
7
votes
13answers
7k views

Does English have words to describe the lowest rank member of society? [closed]

For example, in Indonesia we have "rakyat". In English we may have citizen but the word actually has power connotation rather than powerless connotation. Another word is peasant. But that seems to ...
5
votes
6answers
14k views

Who says “mummy” and “daddy”?

Is the use of the terms mummy and daddy to (informally) refer to one's parents particular to a specific socio-economic class or culture? How does this contrast with the terms mum/ mom, and dad?
2
votes
1answer
5k views

“Drawing room” or “sitting room”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What’s a reception room / parlor / parlour / drawing room? Please consider the following room: The house is a late Victorian townhouse. The room (A) has a size of about 40 ...
19
votes
5answers
65k views

What’s wrong with saying “Have a nice day”?

I once read the book Class: A Guide Through the American Status System by Paul Fussell. There, he mentioned that saying “Have a nice day” was a faux pas, without elaborating why. I’m not American, ...
8
votes
5answers
15k views

“I'm sure” vs. “I'm for sure”: Who uses which, and when?

I hear both (and their negatives: "I'm not sure" and "I'm not for sure"). I want to classify the "for sure" variety as regional Southern, since that's the context I most often hear it. For example, ...