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Questions tagged [causative-verbs]

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4
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What is the difference between had and got?

Are there any significant differences in uses or meanings between these two words? Between the two example sentences below, does one sentence have a slightly different meaning compared to the other, ...
0
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1answer
76 views

The meaning of causative 'have'

(1) He had a specialist examine his son. (2) He had his son examined by a specialist. About this pair, The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (Page 1236) says: we have equivalence ...
0
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1answer
43 views

Causative - Passive/Active voice

Would you agree to the following guidelines: In the Passive voice, the causatives "have" and "get" have the same meaning, but 'get' is less formal In the Active voice, the causatives "have" and "get"...
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2answers
57 views

Something had me do or Something had me doing something else?

I’m edit­ing a short story and I’ve stum­bled upon a prob­lem. I fre­quently use struc­tures like: Agony had my in­sides con­vuls­ing. De­feat had me slump­ing into a chair. Fear had my body shak­...
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0answers
54 views

Can someone please explain this version of the causative form? “I'll have you arrested”

As a non native speaker, I was taught to use the causative form like this: if there's a subject: I'll have her send over the files. if there's no subject: I'll have the files sent over. And now ...
4
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1answer
119 views

why do we use zero infinitives with make, let, have?

When we use causative verbs as in "I asked you to do something", we say "to use". However, we don't say "I made you to do something" but just "do something". Is there any particular reason that we ...
4
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2answers
2k views

Make somebody to do something

I know this verb does not take "to" after the direct object. Although, I spot T.L. Short in his "Peirce's Theory of Signs" always inserting "to" in this construction. What happens? Is it some formal-...
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0answers
120 views

Parsing a sentence with a causative verb

I am an ESL teacher trying to help a student prepare for a test that will have a lot of sentence parsing. We are both stumped by the second verb in causative sentences. For example: She asked the ...
4
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1answer
207 views

“I have you returning the car.”

Context: Top Notch 2 Conversation: Agent: I have you returning the car on August 14th here at the airport. Renter: Yes. That's correct. I am puzzled by this sentence in a conversation ...
0
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1answer
586 views

has me beat vs. has me beaten vs. beats me

An LA Times column titled "A Word, Please: Microsoft unveils top 10 grammar mistakes, but its editing tools aren’t perfect" has this passage: ... Microsoft’s No. 1 most common grammar mistake ...
0
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1answer
623 views

“He made me down” sounds ok to say “He made me sad”? If not, why so?

I'm a newbie to this forum and I've been wondering if the sentence below is gramatically correct, and if not, pls explain the reason linguistically. (I'm not a native English speaker.) He made me ...
1
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1answer
506 views

make someone do vs. get someone doing/to do

I saw some questions about the causative "get" and understood "get someone to do" and "get someone doing" are almost interchangeable. However, I wan't able to find an answer about the difference ...
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0answers
279 views

Verbs formed from noun or adjective roots by adding -ja-

I know that there exist some verbs which were formed in Proto-Germanic by adding the causative marker -ja- to nouns or adjectives, such as these pairs: doom (noun) > deem (verb) food (noun) > feed (...
3
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1answer
299 views

Causative construction

A causative construction is used, for instance, when we have / make / ... someone do something for us. For example, "I had the painter paint my house". We could render this passively too: "I had ...
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2answers
191 views

Using have/has differently in a sentence [closed]

I am not a fluent speaker in English however I was watching this episode on Late night show and the guest (Michelle Obama) framed a sentence saying "It's usually dinnertime. That's the time when ...
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0answers
359 views

Diagramming a Sentence with a Causative Verb

For a Reed–Kellogg sentence diagram, how would you diagram a sentence with a causative verb like "made"? For example: The hot weather made her want to swim. I understand that "weather" is the ...
0
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1answer
256 views

Causative - Have sb do sth

I was wondering if this sentence is OK: I will have you happy (I will cause you to be happy) Does it have the same meaning of I will make you happy I wonder this because I came across a ...
5
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3answers
956 views

Causative with have/get + object + present participle: when can it be used?

I would like to know when the causative with have/get + object + present participle can be used and when it can't. In this answer I found this example: He had us dancing/dance on the table ~ He got ...
3
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1answer
62 views

What is the role of the “to have the” in the sentence

He's been ordered to have the dog destroyed because it's dangerous but he refuses to comply. What is the role of the "to have the" in the sentence and how it is separated from he's been ordered to ...
1
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1answer
76 views

Causative Verb with the verb 'relax' but not 'refresh'

My Chinese student asked me a question. Why is the first sentence incorrect but the second is fine? Music can make me REFRESH. Music can make me relax. Can you help please?
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1answer
129 views

How to analyse “He was found innocent.”

"He was found innocent." How exactly does this work? Is it just an idiomatic contraction of 'found to be innocent'? What about "He was found alive"? 'Found' here is working a lot like a causative ...
0
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1answer
542 views

grammatical function of “think” in “to make us think”?

I'm a teacher, working on verbs with my students--and I got stumped by this sentence: "Consumers are using products ... that are advertised to make us think they assist in weight loss" the word "...
5
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2answers
317 views

Why does the word “be” change so much?

In the phrase make <someone> {adjective}, it implies changing that person's emotion, but make <someone> be {adjective} implies forcing that person to comply. Why does the word "be", which ...
3
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1answer
3k views

“He had me do this” vs “He had me doing this” vs “He had my doing this”

I know this example sounds awkward, but it’s obviously grammatically incorrect to say "me being here" in sentences like this one: He said me being here was wonderful. That instance of me being ...
0
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1answer
164 views

Is it right to say “Draw it big”, and if so, does that mean that “big” is an adverb?

If I have already talked about drawing a circle and want to say to draw a big circle, is it right to say it like this: Draw it big. For this next sentence, would I need an adverb in the blank or ...
3
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2answers
3k views

Have vs. get in the causative

In causative constructions, for example: I'll have him do it for me. I'll get him to do it for me. What is the difference in meaning between them? Obviously, there's a difference in register,...
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1answer
222 views

Finding Cue words

In generalizing what I have learned from Japanese "conjugations" I learned quite a bit. I have come to the realization that the same verb forms ARE present in English although English uses cue words ...
3
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2answers
535 views

meaning of bare infinitivals

[i] I saw her clean the room. [ii] He helped me do the work. [iii] She made me clean the room.         What makes you think so?         Let ...
2
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1answer
601 views

Causative infinitive “get”

I have the following sentence: I've got a lot of things to get done by this weekend. Is it correct? Is to get done a valid causative form?
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2answers
630 views

use of the verb “make” [closed]

The following is part of a blog post in The Huffington Post: In the perfect world we would all be morning people. We would wake up calm, refreshed and ready to tackle the day. But this isn’t a ...
0
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1answer
349 views

Question about the proscribed use of “have” along with “get” or “be” [duplicate]

I have asked before and been told that along with the usage of have, there shouldn't be any other words like be or get, as the have already conveys the meaning on its own. Example 1: She never had ...
5
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2answers
756 views

Why does “enjoy” (almost) not have a causative sense?

Its etymology confirms that the en- is the same prefix as in enshrine, encourage, encircle, etc., which would normally suggest a causative sense. But rather than "to give joy to", the predominant ...
13
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2answers
844 views

“has scientists excited” or “has excited scientists”?

I saw the following on the Facebook page of Time. Is "has scientists excited" or the perfect version "has excited scientists" correct? What's the difference if both are correct? The recent ...
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2answers
139 views

“Made look better” vs. “made to look better”

Results are made to look better by... Results are made look better by... Are both correct? Is there another way of phrasing this sentence?
4
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2answers
1k views

Why do these verbs take bare infinitives?

[a] It makes the tree grow. [b] I never heard him speak. I’m wondering why causative and sense verbs (make, hear) license bare infinitives for their complement, instead of taking to infinitives? What ...
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2answers
2k views

What’s going on with “drink > drench”? Is it like “passage > passenger”?

Edit: I am looking for a particular linguistic term for this process (which here uses terminal palatalization to indicate such) of turning passive verbs like drink into active verbs like drench. I ...
5
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1answer
2k views

Usage of infinitives in this sentence

In my academics I learned that we use infinitives (to + verb 1st form). So I was surprised when someone told me this sentence is incorrect. I am not able to figure it out why this sentence is ...
2
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1answer
5k views

Causative verb using have/has

I can understand the causative form (quite less frequently, we simply say causal verb) with make and get but when used with have/has, it sometimes makes me think differently. Of course, I can ...
2
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3answers
9k views

What is the difference between remember and remind [closed]

Could someone explain the difference between these two words? Here is an example of using each. Your hair and eyes remind me of your mother. I can remember people's faces, but not their names.
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2answers
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“Fall”, “fell”, “felled”

How is the causative form of fall used in English? In the present tense, often enough, A tree falls in the woods, but a logger falls trees as well. but in the past tense, A tree fell in the ...
8
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2answers
4k views

Is “want” a causative verb?

I've always held on to the definition that Causative Verbs express how the Noun before the Verb influences the execution of an action. Similarly, the Longman Student Grammar of Spoken and Written ...
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10answers
2k views

Is this grammatical construction an imperative for the third person?

Is the construction 'Let + subject + verb' considered as an order/imperative for the third person: Let every man count his days when it is intended to mean 'must'/'is ordered to'?
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9answers
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What is the meaning of “I am humbled by XYZ”?

From a recent article on CNN: Aboukhadijeh, who is from Sacramento, California, said he’s been blown away by how quickly his tool went viral and is grateful for all the supportive feedback. “I’...