Questions tagged [catenative-verbs]

A catenative verb is one that chains to another verb immediately following it, where the second verb is normally a non-finite form like a to-infinitive, a bare infinitive, or an -ing form acting as a gerund.

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Why is it "I began to look around" and not "looked" [duplicate]

I'm trying to help a German friend with their English, why is it "I began to look around" and not "I began to looked around" And I'm unsure how to explain it to her simply. Thank ...
Tim's user avatar
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'Manage to' as a catenative verb construction

I've only started my own studies on grammar recently and as I was reading CoGEL by Randolph Quirk, I came across this category called 'Catenative verb constructions'. According to the analysis used in ...
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Is the structure "Who wants this ball to bang on their head?" acceptable?

I am proofreading an English book written by a non-native speaker. A structure the author uses is the following Who wants this ball bang on their head? The meaning intended to be conveyed is: Who ...
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Function of non-finite infinitive clause in catenative constructions

I am bit perplexed as to the function of the infinitive subordinate clause in the following examples: I know him to be a good man. I persuaded him to leave. In analyzing this sentence, "know&...
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Can resign be followed by a to-infinitive?

I was looking at Wiktionary's list of catenative verbs and noticed the list was far from exhaustive. I added "deign," and, having finished reading the list, I was trying to think of others ...
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Only "propose/suggest" doing actions you yourself will be involved in

Is That What you Mean reads If someone suggests doing something, it means that the speaker is one of the people who will do it. Collins Cobuild Usage reads Is this a general pattern? What other ...
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Catenative verbs without "to"

Here's a well-liked comment under a YouTube video, complimenting the creator: This man is an absolute joy to watch do literally anything. Although YouTube likes is not an indicator of grammatical ...
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Are the infinitives that follow catenative verbs considered object?

I am confused to find objects of catenative verbs , for example i was looking for the verb refuse and it's transitive and intransitive when i found some examples from oxford dictionary but still not ...
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changes we have felt it necessary to make [parse of "necessary to make"]

From a textbook: The analysis of content clauses presented in this chapter differs in significant ways from that found in traditional grammar: in this section, therefore, we explain some of the ...
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feel + ... + to-infinitive / bare infinitive

(1) feel + ... + to-infinitive: She felt his answer to be evasive. (2) feel + ... + bare infinitive: She felt him keep something back. I have been trying to find the rule: when "feel" must ...
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Can we have non-finite clauses with overt subject without "for"?

I read the following in a comment to an answer to another post of mine: "What’s the difference between expect for things to improve and expect things to improve? Is that for part of expect for, or is ...
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Does the verb “enable” take a bare-infinitive complement like “let” or a to-infinitive complement like “allow”? [duplicate]

How can you predict which verbs take which type of infinitive as their complements? For example, is the to before open here mandatory, forbidden, or optional? The Gold Monetization Scheme will ...
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Is it possible to have more than four consecutive verbs in a sentence? [closed]

This is simply a question based on curiosity. I have tried to research different combinations of helping verbs and action verbs that contain more than four consecutive verbs, but I can't seem to find ...
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"I like hear good news"

I'd like to know whether it's common in informal speech to delete the infinitive particle "to" in the construction 'to hear sth.' This video shows an example at 6:36; I've analysed it at 0.5 speed, ...
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Can to-infinitives be used after the verb “dislike”?

Can to-infinitives follow the verb dislike? I know they can follow the verb like that way, but what about dislike? I ask because my school grammar textbook says the following: The verb dislike ...
Soha Farhin Pine's user avatar
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Why do we use the objective case pronoun "me" in "He can watch me clean the car"?

He can watch me clean the car. In this sentence, the pronoun me is used as the object of the verb watch. But isn't me also acting as the subject of the verb 'clean' and therefore should be I instead? ...
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Do the -ing and to-infinitive "verbs" that follow catenative verbs always take the grammatical function of "noun"?

I'm wondering whether or not the verb form that follows a catenative verb has the grammatical function of a noun or of a verb, and whether or not it depends on the first catenative verb. "I like to ...
Samantha's user avatar
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Catenatives followed by infinitives and gerunds

What is the difference in meaning when the catenative verb “like” is followed by an infinitive, or by a gerund? For example: Do you like ski jumping? vs. Do you like to ski jump? Also, what ...
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