Questions tagged [catenative-verbs]

A catenative verb is one that chains to another verb immediately following it, where the second verb is normally a non-finite form like a to-infinitive, a bare infinitive, or an -ing form acting as a gerund.

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changes we have felt it necessary to make [parse of “necessary to make”]

From a textbook: The analysis of content clauses presented in this chapter differs in significant ways from that found in traditional grammar: in this section, therefore, we explain some of the ...
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feel + … + to-infinitive / bare infinitive

(1) feel + ... + to-infinitive: She felt his answer to be evasive. (2) feel + ... + bare infinitive: She felt him keep something back. I have been trying to find the rule: when "feel" must be ...
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Can we have non-finite clauses with overt subject without “for”?

I read the following in a comment to an answer to another post of mine: "What’s the difference between expect for things to improve and expect things to improve? Is that for part of expect for, or is ...
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187 views

Does the verb “enable” take a bare-infinitive complement like “let” or a to-infinitive complement like “allow”? [duplicate]

How can you predict which verbs take which type of infinitive as their complements? For example, is the to before open here mandatory, forbidden, or optional? The Gold Monetization Scheme will ...
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1answer
492 views

Is it possible to have more than four consecutive verbs in a sentence?

This is simple a question based on curiosity. I have tried to research different combinations of helping verbs and action verbs that contain more than four consecutive verbs, but I can't seem to find ...
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1answer
980 views

“I like hear good news”

I'd like to know whether it's common in informal speech to delete the infinitive particle "to" in the construction 'to hear sth.' This video shows an example at 6:36; I've analysed it at 0.5 speed, ...
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2answers
11k views

Can to-infinitives be used after the verb “dislike”?

Can to-infinitives follow the verb dislike? I know they can follow the verb like that way, but what about dislike? I ask because my school grammar textbook says the following: The verb dislike ...
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3answers
390 views

Why do we use the objective case pronoun “me” in “He can watch me clean the car”?

He can watch me clean the car. In this sentence, the pronoun me is used as the object of the verb watch. But isn't me also acting as the subject of the verb 'clean' and therefore should be I instead? ...
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2answers
2k views

Do the -ing and to-infinitive “verbs” that follow catenative verbs always take the grammatical function of “noun”?

I'm wondering whether or not the verb form that follows a catenative verb has the grammatical function of a noun or of a verb, and whether or not it depends on the first catenative verb. "I like to ...
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4answers
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Catenatives followed by infinitives and gerunds

What is the difference in meaning when the catenative verb “like” is followed by an infinitive, or by a gerund? For example: Do you like ski jumping? vs. Do you like to ski jump? Also, what ...