Questions tagged [category]

The tag has no usage guidance.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
0 votes
5 answers
124 views

Is there a word for sets of words with related meaning in English, like 'yellow' and 'green' or 'January' and 'February'?

I'm learning the Indonesian language, and they took the word 'antonim' from Dutch (antonym in English), but changed and expanded the meaning. In Indonesian, 'green' is an antonym of 'yellow' and '...
user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
136 views

Can I really follow the theoretical framework proposed in the Cambridge Grammar of the English Language?

In the book 'the Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (CGEL)', the authors propose the theoretical framework used to describe the English sentences as shown below: CGEL, page 26 To get the tree ...
user avatar
  • 21
0 votes
1 answer
67 views

How to categorize 'perfect' and 'dead'? [duplicate]

Is there a term for adjectives like perfect, ubiquitous and dead, that permit only certain modifiers? They're essentially absolute, but not quite binary. There's no range of ubiquity -- something is ...
user avatar
  • 11k
1 vote
2 answers
139 views

A word to describe sets of something divided into three equal parts as per "quartile" (fourths) or "quintile" (fifths)

I am looking for a word that describes a set of numeric values divided into three equal, ordered parts. For example, "quartile" refers to subsets of a set that has been divided into four ...
user avatar
  • 111
2 votes
2 answers
264 views

Are people, who are working on physical fitness, exercisers?

Is there an overarching term that designates people who are involved in physical fitness and therapeutic endeavors (includes athletes, physical therapy patients, gym-goers, and physical yoga ...
user avatar
  • 200
-1 votes
1 answer
40 views

What are words like most, greatest, best etc. categorised as? [closed]

Basically the words Donald Trump likes to use. Not thinking of quantifiers or nouns. Something that emphasises words? Some category for describing extremities?
user avatar
  • 239
1 vote
1 answer
57 views

General term for permanent or non-permanent

As the title states. I'm looking for a general term for permanent, temporary, etc. The best I could come up with so far is permanence, although after I looked at the definition I'm not sure that ...
user avatar
  • 437
0 votes
0 answers
35 views

Is there a term for the type of phrase being used in "far and wide"? [duplicate]

Can you categorise terms that use two related but possibly contrasting words together, to describe something like a totality? Two examples I can think of: "I searched far and wide" - meaning,...
user avatar
2 votes
3 answers
94 views

looking for a collection of words that define a taxonomy

I'm looking for a set of words that define a logical, hierarchical structure to define a simple 3 level taxonomy, but it needs to comply with the following requirements: The words must be related, ...
user avatar
  • 19
2 votes
2 answers
159 views

Are there any general terms that encompass a large number of things such as soil, sand, silt, clay, mud, and gravel?

My question is in the title, the below paragraph is the backstory for anyone interested. I just want to know if a general term that refers to any broad class of materials anything close to what is ...
user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
55 views

Is there a language technique that categories inverse meanings?

After being asked if I want a receipt at the markets, I notice I can alternate between - I'm good - I'm fine - I'm okay All of these by literal meaning, vaguely motions a "positive" response, ...
user avatar
  • 179
0 votes
0 answers
55 views

Is there a name for words which fit all four of the given lexical categories?

This question is Inspired by a practice exam question which is provided below. (Please note I'm not asking for answers to the exam question, as I provided my own) Use the word fast in sentences in ...
user avatar
  • 269
0 votes
1 answer
193 views

A general term for 'how positive/negative is this result' [closed]

I am running a series of tests, each of which has one of several possible results: Negative, Positive, Detected, Not Detected, Equivocal, etc. I need to group these into results which are 'generally ...
user avatar
  • 417
1 vote
1 answer
191 views

Open and closed final syllables in multisyllabic words

Can a 2-syllable word have two open syllables? Essentially, can the final syllable of a 2+ syllable word be open? I know that an open syllable is one where it ends with a long vowel sound and does ...
user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
541 views

What is the name of the property of "words with only unique characters"?

I am looking for the name of the property of words spelled with at most 1 of each characters. Words like palindrome make me hope there is a single word for this but I would be satisfied with multiple ...
user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
104 views

Is there a special name for that kind of product category?

I'm making a webshop and I can't find a good name for a special category. Is there any name for a category that holds products which will be no longer sold after the stock has been run out? In ...
user avatar
  • 113
1 vote
0 answers
115 views

Is there a word for words/sentences that can mean opposite things?

I was thinking about the sentence: "I took a class today". As a tutor and a student myself, when I have used this sentence I have to clarify whether I mean "I taught a class today" or "I was a ...
user avatar
  • 11
1 vote
1 answer
880 views

If I were to place Dine-in, Takeaway, and Delivery into a category, what would be an appropriate title for the category?

So I have an application which displays a list of restaurants to a user. This list of restaurants can be filtered by cuisine, features etc. I want this list to be able to filtered by dine-in, takeaway,...
user avatar
  • 111
0 votes
3 answers
2k views

What is an egg?

This feels like it should have a simple answer, but my googling has turned up nothing. I am classifying ingredients by their type. Consider the following: Flour is a powder (eg: 20g flour) Milk is ...
user avatar
2 votes
3 answers
100 views

Term for machinery of polish sanding grinding

Is there any English term which refer to general category of machines which perform polish, sanding, grinding and finishing of mechanical(especially metals)?
user avatar
  • 123
1 vote
1 answer
925 views

categories of verb inflections

Hi I'm working on a software project for work that inflects english words into their various derived forms. e.g. work (verb) -> works, working, worked. My main problem at the moment is that I need to ...
user avatar
  • 121
0 votes
1 answer
684 views

How are words that describe a certain sound called? [duplicate]

They're different in different languages, but I'm looking for the name of the category of those words. For example, a sound of dog's barking: "woof-woof". But in Russian it's "ghav-ghav"; A sound of ...
user avatar
  • 33
0 votes
1 answer
163 views

Keeping Up with the Joneses, Vocative Edition

TLDR: This question is about vocatives. Is there a rule to explain how to know whether you can drop a person’s name when addessing someone just by their title alone, or whether that form is ...
user avatar
  • 127k
11 votes
7 answers
1k views

Is there one word that describes the attribute of being either disposable or reusable?

For example: Red and blue are to color as disposable and reusable are to __________
user avatar
  • 119
0 votes
0 answers
197 views

Is there a category name for verbs beginning with 'be-'? Is 'be-' a general prefix for words?

I wonder about words like: Beseech Befallen Beholder (?) Bewitch Befool Befriend Befog and so on... Those words have always caught my attention, and I find them somewhat more sophisticated. My ...
user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
295 views

Category of "In cahoots."

If I say "They were in cahoots", 'cahoots' makes most sense as a noun. There are different kinds of nouns. I'm sure different linguistic systems divide them up differently. For instance, there are ...
user avatar
  • 653
0 votes
1 answer
79 views

Better adjectives to encapsulate this particular usage of "useful" and the opposite

I'm trying to find words to best differentiate attentions such as jobs, free time usage, and goals into two categories. There are tasks that serve some level of reasonable necessity and most often ...
user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
132 views

How is unjustifiable (falsely attributed) usage of *we* or *us* called? [closed]

I wonder what the name of phenomenon when a speaker uses we or us to falsely (and, really, deceptively) attach oneself to a group (like when a politician says "hard times await us" in his public ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
104 views

Category for homesteading, prepping, survival, off-grid, outdoorsmanship

For a website, wiki or blog forum, and as a category for organizing books— Is there a category or meta-category that includes homesteading, prepping, survival skills, outdoorsmanship, and off-grid ...
user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
2k views

Categorize English words based on difficulty to learn by foreigner [closed]

I have a list of 8000 English words used in my application to training vocabularies for new learners. I need to categorize these words into three categories (easy,medium,hard). Are there any known ...
user avatar
  • 117
3 votes
1 answer
218 views

What category of adjectives is this? i.e. adjectives entirely unlike their nouns

Consider the noun "Jupiter", either the Roman god or the giant gaseous planet in our Solar System. The adjective is "jovian", entirely unrelated. Is this a distinct class of adjectives? I suspect ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
130 views

Category for student and education

The term student tends to creep into the category job but being in education is not a job as you aren't paid for it. banker police officer nurse are all positions in work under the category jobs ...
user avatar
  • 143
0 votes
1 answer
2k views

Which part of speech do these words belong to? [closed]

This probably isn't a complete list of these types of words, but I am wanting to know what category these words go into: quality attribute property
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
1k views

What mistake is made when words are incorrectly split into two different words, changing the meaning?

Is there a terminology for when correct English words that are made up of other English words are incorrectly split to use the shorter words out of context? Examples of the error I am trying to ...
user avatar
  • 325
0 votes
1 answer
219 views

Categorized dictionary of the English language [closed]

What dictionaries are there available which offer some kind of classification of words into different categories? I am looking for a free alternative to WordStat. I would like to use the ...
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
332 views

Plurality of phrases describing categories of objects

When talking about a specific category of objects, does it make more sense to attach plurality to the label of the category, as in: Dogs are in the kingdom of animals, which also include cats. or ...
user avatar
  • 149
5 votes
1 answer
2k views

Terms for "natural gender" and "grammatical gender"

This post is partly inspired by previous posts, such as this one, on non-existence of grammatical gender in English. My question is mainly about what "natural gender" and "grammatical gender" are to ...
user avatar
  • 6,158
6 votes
3 answers
41k views

Is 'there' an adverb or a preposition? (Or something else entirely!?)

Most dictionaries seem to describe 'there' as an adverb. Oxford online dictionary definition Is this true? "Last year we went to Paris. We stayed there for three nights." In sentences like this '...
user avatar
  • 631
4 votes
1 answer
582 views

What lexical relationship lies between the days of the week?

I'm confused, What is the lexical relationship between "Monday" and "Tuesday"? I mean is the relationship hyponymy, prototypes, polysemy, homophones, metonymy etc?
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
796 views

Can a singular noun be used to represent a category of things in a sentence subject?

Specifically, in following sentences, which ones are correct? Elephants are huge. The elephant is huge. An elephant is huge. Elephant is huge. I think 1 and 2 above are correct, but how about 3 ...
user avatar
  • 113
17 votes
4 answers
3k views

Surely *some* wordsmiths must love America[ns]?

People who like/admire English or French (the languages and/or the people and their culture) are easily identified as Anglophiles or Francophiles. I'm not sure there are so many Germanophiles, but ...
user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
311 views

Word that categorizes this set of words: {forewords, preface, prologue, chapter, author's note, etc}

I am looking for a singular word that categorizes this set of words: {forewords, preface, prologue, chapter, author's note, etc} The best I can come up with right now is Section Heading which is ...
user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
1k views

Is there a word that describes a person whose given name and surname each contains but a single syllable?

Is there a word that describes a person whose given name and surname each contains but a single syllable? Some examples are: Mae West Bill Fold John Doe
user avatar
  • 27
4 votes
5 answers
5k views

A term for "Groceries, toiletries & Conveniences" everyday products

Is there a common term that covers both groceries & conveniences. Products that one would purchase either at supermarkets or corner stores? Is there a venue type that would describe supermarkets, ...
user avatar
  • 143
3 votes
2 answers
2k views

Do all syllables belong to open syllable or closed syllable?

Is there any other category for a syllable which is neither an open nor closed syllable?
user avatar