Questions tagged [catch-phrases]

A well-known sentence or phrase, typically one that is associated with a particular famous person.

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7
votes
5answers
90k views

Word for seeing both sides of an argument

This feeling can often be paralyzing in that you see valid points on either side; makes you not able to choose a side. Seeing can also be understanding, supporting, taking active part in. I'm ...
9
votes
8answers
23k views

Origin of “they don't know they're born”?

Practising today for my forthcoming role as radgie gadgie, I was having a little rant about modern youth: "they don't know they're born!" This seems to me rather a strange phrase to describe someone ...
14
votes
1answer
2k views

Batman vs. Maxwell Smart. Who said, “Good thinking, …!” first?

Recently, I've come across the catchphrase, "Good thinking, [name/noun]!" three times on ELU. The first was in a question referring to Terry Pratchett's catchphrase "Good thinking, that man!" 1 The ...
9
votes
2answers
188k views

Origin of “I see, said the blind man, as he waved his wooden leg”

"I see", said the blind man, as he waved his wooden leg. is an expression used by someone on whom comprehension has just dawned, or a catch-phrase addressed to that person. Sometimes it can be ...
5
votes
1answer
369 views

Who ruled first, “girls” or “boys”?

A recent ELL question contains a catchphrase which is utterly novel to me. Boys rule, girls drool Wanting to know more, I searched online and found a female variant. Girls rule and boys drool ...
9
votes
3answers
5k views

Why does one “laugh to see a pudding crawl”?

You'd laugh to see a pudding crawl is a catch-phrase aimed at someone who is easily amused or is suffering a fit of uncontrollable hilarity. Does anyone know how this phrase came into being? I'm not ...
9
votes
1answer
11k views

Origin of “All right, what's all this, then?!”

Wonder where is the origin of this phrase? I first heard it on Monty Python. Typical scenario being, a sort of clueless Scotland yard cop enters the scene and asks "alright... what's all this then?" ...
8
votes
2answers
33k views

What does the phrase “You're out of your element” mean?

I heard it in The Big Lebowski movie, when Walter yells at Donny, "shut the fuck up, Donny"; then he exclaims, "You're out of your element!".
3
votes
2answers
2k views

Where did the phrase “put a sock in it” come from?

What are the origin and history of the phrase put a sock in it?