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Questions tagged [canadian-english]

Questions about the English language as spoken in Canada.

0
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1answer
41 views

What is considered as verbatim copying exactly? [closed]

I am always confused when it the word verbatim copying or word for word comes up. What does that exactly mean For example The statement below: Examining and investigating any electrical components ...
2
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1answer
56 views

Draft Beer or Draught Beer (In Canada)

There's a few threads on here about draft vs draught, but I couldn't find an answer to my question. As a preface, I'm Canadian, and know that draft (US) and draught (UK) are generally interchangeable,...
0
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2answers
90 views

Where exactly did the slang phrase “digging it” come from

I'm a young native english speaker raised in Canada. At school me and most of my friends tend to use the phrase "Im really digging this", as to mean i'm really enjoying a specific thing or activity. ...
2
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1answer
51 views

Alternative terms for Men's and Women's T-shirts?

I'm going to be hosting an event that may include gender non-binary participants, and we have some t-shirts to give away. They are manufactured in Men's and Women's cuts. Are there any terms that ...
2
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1answer
427 views

Defense vs. Defence in Canadian English

I recently came across this spelling of "defense/ce" in a Canadian newspaper: Canada is a close U.S. military ally and the top U.S. export market, more than the U.K., Japan and Germany combined. It ...
0
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1answer
330 views

Is it impolite to say hello to a doctor as “Hi, First Name”? [closed]

I'm based in Canada and I'm not a native English speaker. Is it impolite to call doctors and dentists by their first name instead of "Dr. Last Name" when answering a phone call?
1
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1answer
125 views

“'ve” contraction in Canadian and Australian English

I'm wondering if in Australian or Canadian English you can use " 've" before a noun phrase in informal style: I've a car. They've a great time. The question is somewhat related to this one. The ...
-1
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3answers
3k views

“I have to face” or “I have been facing” and what is the difference? [closed]

I have to face the real face of life. Is this sentence correct? Or should I say: I have been facing the real face of life. What I am trying to say is that I have been forced to do this.
2
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1answer
63 views

What is the archaic Canadian word for a chesterfield throwover?

So in a casual conversation with other Canadian writers, I asked the question because I was told by my parents that there was a specific word used by their parents for the throwover you place on the ...
4
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2answers
259 views

In Canada, does the expression “I'll pick up your slack” have negative, derogatory or positive connotation?

I was speaking to a native Canadian when he told me during a video game progress: "I'll pick up the slack" I got upset with him because I know that slack has a negative connotation which means he ...
3
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3answers
1k views

How do Canadians pronounce “eh”?

In a recent post, I was trying to describe Spanish vowels succinctly to an unsophisticated participant, and used the Canadian "eh?" as an example. A participant from the U.S. (California, to be ...
3
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3answers
4k views

Is “in-TEST-eyen” a valid pronunciation for “intestine”?

Is "in-TEST-eyen" /ɪnˈtestaɪn/ a valid pronunciation for "intestine"? I looked up "intestine" in MacMillan, Oxford, Cambridge, Merriam-Webster and even the Longman Pronunciation Dictionary, none of ...
1
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1answer
2k views

Why isn't it appropriate to use an exclamation point in an essay? And how can I get around that? [closed]

I am currently writing a research essay for my English twelve class, and we are not allowed any exclaimation points whatsoever. But this one sentence is something I feel absolutely requires it! HELP: ...
1
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2answers
133 views

What does the term “White Privilege” mean?

I can't really find a definition that explains the concept of "White Privilege" in a simple way, but what I have understood so far is that it means white people will benefit or enjoy more power and ...
3
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4answers
1k views

Hallowe'en and shell out

Growing up in Canada, in addition to "trick-or-treating" as a description of kids' activities on Hallowe'en evening, I often heard the verb "shell out", conjugated as "shelling out" or "shellouting". ...
1
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1answer
740 views

meaning of “quite+adjective” in Canadian English

I am translating a Canadian article, and here's a sentence I need some help with: There are innumerable colour choices when choosing gladioli corms but until recent years, those colours classed ...
3
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3answers
2k views

“Accessory” pronounced with a stress on the first syllable

I'm a first language English speaker, but grew up bilingual in Spanish in a Spanish speaking country. Today I was speaking to another first language English speaker (Canadian) and used the word "...
4
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3answers
787 views

What word(s) do children of English native speakers use for “kid”/“child”/etc

I'm looking for (a) word(s) that is/are perceived to be child's language by adults, not words used by adults to describe children. What would be fine though are words used by adults when they are ...
4
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3answers
12k views

Is written Canadian English closer to American English or British English?

I'm having some writing done for a website aimed at a Canadian audience. In order to leverage our resources more, I'd like to focus on American English or British English. So, is written Canadian ...
1
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1answer
418 views

Meaning of “Feds” in Canadian English?

Examples: "Feds will make music downloading illegal, Heritage minister says." and "Feds to look at offering Canadians option to increase CPP contributions" My best guess is simply Federal ...
3
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2answers
675 views

Canadian English and collective nouns subject/verb agreement

Please, forgive me if this has already been asked. I did a quick search and found nothing specifically regarding Canadians, but a kind redirection would be helpful if this is a repeat. I understand ...
1
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1answer
213 views

Socket or outlet, which one do you use when explaining to a child? [closed]

I'm just curious.... In the USA, how do you explain to a child 'don't put anything in the electrical outlet' or 'don't play with a wall socket'?? How do you say the same thing around the globe?
3
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1answer
725 views

How can choosing to speak in English rather than French have an emotional impact on me? [closed]

I’ve grown up speaking two languages. I can seamlessly swap between French and English, but somehow I often feel like I can’t speak my mind when speaking French. When it comes to things that are ...
15
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4answers
3k views

How do Torontonians pronounce the name of their hometown?

Toronto - The capital and largest city of Ontario, Canada, in the southern part of the province on Lake Ontario. [tə-ˈrän-(ˌ)tō, -ˈrän-tə] — Merriam-Webster [tuh-ron-toh] — Reference.com [təˈrän(t)ō] ...
4
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3answers
188 views

Term for aboriginal people of Canada in a historical context

The tribes that inhabited Canada before European contact are generally known as First Nations today. From what I can tell, this term is fairly new. What term could I use to refer to First Nations ...
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1answer
349 views

Translating from American to Canadian, when these are used as verbs, is it “log in” and “log out” or “login” and “logout”?

This is not a duplicate of questions such as“Login” or “log in”? or “log in to” or “log into” or “login to”. The reason is that this question deals specifically with converting from American English ...
1
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1answer
351 views

“Her” in a sentence

I have a question about the use of "her" in English. Here is a conversation: Q. Any luck finishing your part? A. Working on her right now. Here, does her refer to part A of the question? Is it ...
1
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2answers
2k views

"Why are you still in my office? VS Why do you still in my office? [closed]

What is the difference between those questions and which one is the correct form?
1
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3answers
9k views

Use of “as good” and “as well”

Are these two sentences correct? This is as good as ... This works as well as ... Edit: This one is as good as the other one. This one works as well as the other one.
4
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4answers
9k views

Boogie - Negative connotation?

I work in a company which has a product called "Boogie" (for reasons that the original owner knows). The product has been called that way for years in our French Canadian environment. Our few English ...
2
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3answers
432 views

Résumé as summary vs document describing work experience

Because "résumé" or "resume" as a noun is a false cognate with the French equivalent, I tend to avoid using "résumé" to mean "summary", and only reserve it to mean "that document people bring to ...
3
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1answer
2k views

What is the most common name for the floor above the ground floor in Canada?

I think the floor above the ground floor, in public buildings, is either called 2nd floor (in which case the ground floor is the first) or 1st floor. This is quite confusing since you need to know the ...
17
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2answers
2k views

Canadian spelling: why?

As a Canadian, I feel that our spelling tendencies—sometimes British, sometimes American—fit quite well with our geographic, historic and cultural placement between these two bigger countries. I have ...
16
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6answers
10k views

The use of “hey” in North America

Having had my formative years in New Zealand, I was born in South Africa. I vaguely recall when I was VERY young having someone tell me when I said "hey" that "hay is what horses eat". I got that ...
6
votes
2answers
1k views

What does the end of sentence “eh” tag mean in Canadian English?

What does the end of sentence eh tag mean in Canadian English? It seems like it should mean something. In other languages, final tags can indicate questions or other things.
6
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7answers
2k views

Tuques and dialects - What do you call a knitted cap in your region/dialect? [closed]

In Canadian English the word tuque refers to a knitted cap for use in cold weather. I'd like to know what such an item is commonly called in other dialects and regions since most people are utterly ...
1
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5answers
2k views

Americans stereotype Canadian pronunciation of “about”? [closed]

Americans think that Canadians pronounce about as aboot (I've never heard anyone pronounce it that way) yet they pronounce route as root. They know how to pronounce out, about, router (as rauwter) ...
7
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9answers
25k views

Why is it called an “Indian file”?

I recently came across a US phrase, Indian file. This is utterly unheard of in the UK, and probably outside North America; at least I’ve certainly never heard of it. The phrase would be expressed in ...
6
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3answers
2k views

Spelling protocol (American/British/Canadian) for an International conference

If I'm a Canadian who'll be presenting in an international conference, should I use my country's spelling, which is the Canadian/British spelling like "grey" or the more used American spelling like "...
16
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5answers
45k views

Why is 'forty' spelled without a 'u' in Canadian/British English?

I was writing in Word today (with the Canadian English dictionary enabled) and it kept putting a redline under "fourty" which I couldn't understand. A bit of searching says that, even in British and ...
15
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9answers
17k views

Is “Canuck” offensive?

I was criticized the other day for using this word. It never occurred to me that it was offensive, but Wikipedia says it "may" be derogatory. Given Vancouver's hockey team, I tend to think it's benign,...
6
votes
3answers
20k views

“Untick” vs. “uncheck”: which is more common in Canadian English?

I'd be grateful if any Canadian speakers can tell me: in the context of an option in a computer dialog box/menu, which of the words "untick" vs "uncheck" is most commonly used (or are they used ...
16
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4answers
37k views

“Checking” vs. “chequing” vs. “chequeing” with regards to types of bank accounts

I came across this little dilemma when looking up the incorrectly spelled word "chequing" in my web browser's dictionary (Opera). According to the different dictionaries you can select in Opera: EN ...
5
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6answers
16k views

What does it mean to be “hard done by” - a phrase I heard from a Canadian friend

From the context of discussion, I took "hard done by" to mean "taken advantage unfair of" as in "He felt hard done by by former friends." I had never heard the phrase before and have not heard it ...
21
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4answers
105k views

What are the important differences between Canadian and American (USA) English?

English is not my first language; the little English I know is mostly from the USA. I know some of the differences between British English (or just English?) and American English, and the same with ...