Questions tagged [british-english]

This tag is for questions related to English as used in Great Britain, and sometimes Ireland.

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1answer
233 views

What are good use of alliterative words for describing a rain on the tin roof? [closed]

I just had this question in my school homework asking to use alliteration words. The question was like this: Use words with the same beginning to describe the sounds made by the words in bold: A) Rain ...
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1answer
64 views

The meaning of "lou" [Lew - the person's name] [closed]

What is the meaning of “lou” at 0:23 in this video?
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48 views

If I'd like to indicate a duration of more than x years, can I write it as "+x years"?

For instance, can I say "we provided +10 hours of programming services"?
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58 views

The Bee's Knees -- still used in UK?

This nonsense phrase was exported along with American soldiers to England during ww2. Now, except for someone using it to be deliberately old-fashioned sounding, I would bet this phrase had not been ...
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1answer
116 views

Olden version of "psychopath"

Apparently, the term "psychopath" was coined in 1888, and at that point, it might not have even been used by the laypeople. So, I*m wondering about a word used for people that display ...
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1answer
78 views

Writing out scientific symbols

How should µeV be written out? Is it microelectronvolts? or microelectron-volts?
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1answer
35 views

If I put the word "over" in my answer, is it wrong?

The given context is as follows: The lack of a strong gravitational pull has caused any water the moon may have had to leak out into space over the 4.6 billion years that it has been in existence. ...
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1answer
204 views

Does the word ”attention” have a verb? [closed]

I studied the nominalisation, but I'm so confused if the noun ”attention” regards as nominalisation, and if say so, what its verb?
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1answer
29 views

Plural of implementer

Just a quick question, is implementers the plural of the word implementer? My computer spellcheck complains about it, however https://www.thefreedictionary.com/implementers and https://en.wiktionary....
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27 views

Single word request: ... but none of these practices explicitly justified

Background: varying reasons used for justifying brain tumour non-surgery lead to questionable outcomes. However, there can be cases where operation just couldn't be done due to very poor health status....
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1answer
12 views

A cohort study: A is causing B __OR__ A is causing B: a cohort study

Most research titles are written as the second example. Would it be correct to use the first structure? A population-wide cohort study: A is causing B A is causing B: a population-wide cohort study
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1answer
85 views

Should I write 'organization' or 'organisation'? [duplicate]

I can not choose what to write for my project about being organised... Should I write: organization or organisation Is it just a spelling difference between American English and British English? (I ...
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2answers
576 views

Put the right man "on the right job" or "in the right job"?

I googled and found some examples with "in". But when I asked my native friend, he told me it should be "on".
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24 views

Describing disparities in different levels

I am struggling to describe disparities in different levels. Let's take an example, showing disparities in income between the different regions of UK. Does the map show country-level disparities or ...
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0answers
10 views

Comma needed or not: ... , indicating increasing inequality, rather than a positive change

Understanding comma use still feels a mission impossible. Is the second comma needed? May it be said that comma use often feeling-based, rather than rule based? The variation of income increased in ...
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0answers
14 views

Single word request: describing analyses different geographical levels

I am writing a methodological paper about statistical methods for identifying disparities in different geographical levels (country-level and state/county-level). Would it be correct to use "...
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0answers
26 views

Computer vision, image processing software algorithms for identification, synonym, segregation of english & american words & terms images

https://www.google.com/search?q=words+difference+between+american+and+british+english&oq=Words+difference+between+american+eng&aqs=chrome.1.69i57j0i22i30i457.20248j0j7&client=ms-android-...
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14 views

Definite article needed or not: A recurrent principle in heart disease management is ensuring continuity of rehabilitation

The following sentence is about heart disease rehabilitation. Could you explain when should I use "the" and when not? Or should I always use an article with "of" phrases? A ...
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2answers
675 views

Origin of the slang "L7"

What's the origin of the (I believe Brit) slang "L7"? In particular what decade (or even century) did this come from? Region? Footnote - entirely possible it is not British; IDK. Could ...
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0answers
52 views

Combining two sentences into a single one for a title

I would like to combine two sentences that describe two distinct applications of a tool into a single sentence. This sentence will be used as a title. A reader should be albe to take out of the title ...
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1answer
186 views

What is the British English equivalent for "homebody"?

A homebody is, simply put, a person who likes staying at home more than going out. The Oxford Dictionary tags the word as "informal North American", while the Cambridge Dictionary tags it as ...
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20 views

Options for reporting date ranges in a compact way

I am exceeding the word limit in an abstract. What are my options for limiting words in the following sentence? The study included patients with X diagnosis between 1 January 2009 and 30 September ...
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0answers
43 views

Back in the days vs back in the day

I know that 'back in the day' can be used as a four-word temporal modifier: Back in the day, we all used to meet down at the gym. Whereas 'back in the days' is not used on its own and always has a ...
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91 views

What does "mechanical sympathy" & "transcend crude oversimplifications" mean?

Am going through a documentation. In the below quote: “You don’t have to be an engineer to be be a racing driver, but you do have to have Mechanical Sympathy.” – Jackie Stewart, racing driver What ...
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35 views

Is "till" inclusive or exclusive? [duplicate]

I just want to know whether till is exclusive or inclusive, like if someone says count from 1 till 5, should I say 1,2,3,4,5 or 1,23,4
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1answer
55 views

No test that you wouldn't have had done before

No test that you wouldn't have had done before https://youtu.be/4nm6Xaxvqd0?t=200 (3:20) Is this phrase grammatical? There's no idiom such as would (not) have or have done. What about No test you ...
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21 views

Which is the correct proposition to use?

I am writing a research article for which I plan to provide supplementary material which details the methodology. Which is the correct proposition to use in the following phrase? supplementary ...
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1answer
217 views

What led to or what leads to?

Which of the following sentences below is correct? Examples: What leads to World War or what led to World War? What led to the invention of computers or what lead to the invention of computers?
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75 views

What does "Reverts to type in" means?

What does "Reverts to type in" means in this headline: "Donald Trump reverts to type in debate – and it isn't 'magnificently brilliant"
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2answers
98 views

Do people in Britain use this structure nowdays? Or is it considered archaic there? [closed]

I found it on one website about If I were/If I was usage, and I'm not sure it's common: If I had been a boy, I would have happily roamed outside all night. “if I had been” talks about a particular ...
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3answers
87 views

BE term for a historical type of outlaw?

An old-fashioned punishment consisted of depriving an individual of the benefit and protection of the law. Does British English have a more explicit term for such an indiviudal than "outlaw"?...
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0answers
18 views

Is there a name for the UK English repeating of a subject in a sentence - IE "I can do science, me" [duplicate]

The catchphrase of an old British science show called Brainiac is "I can do science, me." I've noted the likes of Karl Pilkington in the UK doing this sort of "double subject" ...
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2answers
1k views

Origin of the expression "to be gagging to do something"

There's an informal British meaning to the word gag, which is [to] be very eager to have or do (something). It's generally used (i.e., I've only ever heard it this way) in the present continuous ...
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46 views

Not able to understand the meaning of a particular sentence

"When she joined the organization, my mother was an 18-year old, fair and green-eyed plump girl with a ready laugh. Most men around her were older to her-coming from varied backgrounds, rural, ...
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1answer
45 views

Am I understanding this sentence by Tolkien correctly?

I hope that my inadequate knowledge of Swedish - no better than my kn. of Dutch, but I possess a v. much better Dutch dictionary! - tends to exaggerate the impression I received. The impression ...
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1answer
90 views

What does "you'll know me again" mean in British English?

I'm reading The Lives of Christopher Chant by Diana Wynne Jones, and someone says to a stranger who is helping him, "You'll know me again, young lady." What does that mean? I think it must ...
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1answer
55 views

Meaning of the last paragraph ( in bold text ) [closed]

That night we were to have Mr Chamberlain as our dinner guest. ‘I am dining in very bad company,’ he observed, surveying us with a challenging air. We explained how inept and arrogant the action of ...
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0answers
14 views

How to use this and that in daily conversation. For example: 'this' or 'that is a good question' [duplicate]

I'm a little confused about the usage of that and this. For example: My teacher was giving out our predicted grade. When it was my turn, she said:"A, A*" I asked "What does that mean?&...
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25 views

Subject verb agreement query

Is the following sentence correct? 'They are a couple.' 'A' makes 'couple' singular in this sentence (although 'couple'is already a singular noun) so how can we use 'they' and 'are' for 'couple' as it ...
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2answers
57 views

Meaning of "no odds against success affected me"

Now I was in the right mood for these undertakings – failure being almost certain, no odds against success affected me. It's used in the above sentence. Failure being almost certain means that sure ...
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1answer
26 views

Thank-you note email [closed]

I am writing a thank-you email after completing my internship. I would like to add something like this: "if there are any openings in your department, I hope you'll let me know so I can apply&...
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2answers
142 views

Agreement between subject and verb in a number of / the number of [duplicate]

3 sentences:- A number of such incidents has/have been reported by the local residents so far. The number of such incidents is/are very low. The number of elephants in Kerala has/have been dwindling. ...
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1answer
117 views

Is "know the drill" used in American English as well as UK English in a daily conversation?

Some of my American friends say this is truly American expression. And I found this comment; “Get prepared and ready for your punishment” (especially if you have already been punished before) either ...
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1answer
56 views

What is the answer? Amount or Quantity or Number [duplicate]

Try to reduce the .......... of cups of tea you drink a day (amount - Quantity - Number) Some help please
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1answer
34 views

Is this sentence grammatically correct (version 2)? [closed]

I have been trying to write this sentence for a while and I am wondering whether this is grammatically correct? The story nicely flows and the transition never stops the reader cold. I also attempted ...
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0answers
227 views

declared as or declared

The sentence is :- Supreme Court can declare the parliamentary laws as unconstitutional. Do we have to use 'as' in the aforementioned sentence. What's the difference if we use it vs when we don't?
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49 views

"Don't they carry one back to all one's parties?"

In Katherine Mansfield's The Garden Party (1921), there is this question I cannot decipher semantically nor grammatically. In this scene, this high-society family is preparing a garden party. Cream ...
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1answer
227 views

Is there a British equivalent for "Monday morning quarterback"?

Is there a British or general English (as opposed to Americanism) equivalent for "Monday morning quarterback" that describes someone who acts as if they had known the result of something all ...
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1answer
37 views

Is it correct to say "the reality between which he is torn sympathizing and vilifying" [closed]

what is the correct to write the reality between which he is torn sympathizing and vilifying or the reality which he is torn between sympathizing and vilifying
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1answer
4k views

What is the meaning of "coming Friday"? [closed]

Suppose today is Wednesday and someone told me to schedule the meeting on the coming Friday. Which Friday would that be?

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