Questions tagged [british-english]

This tag is for questions related to English as used in Great Britain, and sometimes Ireland.

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3answers
60 views

How is the word “wrangle” used in Europe?

I'm starting a new online business in the US, and hope to attract customers in Europe as well. I'm thinking about using the word wrangler in the name of the business. The meaning I'm intending is &...
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1answer
54 views

British pronunciation of the word “year”

It's clear that this word is usually pronounced /jɪə/, but it seems to me that in some British accents (probably one of them is RP) it's pronounced /jeə/ so that it becomes a homophone of ‘yeah’. ...
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0answers
6 views

Why does Bart Simpson frequently speak British sentences in the classic The Simpsons episodes? [migrated]

In many situations in the old The Simpsons episodes, Bart inexplicably speaks a sentence in British, out of the blue. For example: You mean it ain't me noggin', it's me peepers? (After his American ...
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0answers
52 views

Nike brand pronounced /ˈnʌɪk/ instead of /ˈnaɪki/? BrE? Or? [duplicate]

I've only ever known Nike to be pronounced as /ˈnaɪki/. Recently, I've heard many BrE speakers exclusively read the brand as: /ˈnʌɪk/. Do all BrE speakers pronounce Nike in this way? Is it a regional ...
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2answers
127 views

Using the word “minutes” when saying the time

I have a question regarding the word "minutes" used in the context of telling someone what time it is. Actually, I think there may be regional differences, and, therefore, I have not one but ...
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2answers
162 views

'off the stone' equivalent in American English

I have been re-reading Jeffrey Archer's The Fourth Estate, and saw this sentence: ..he would cycle to the offices of the Courier and watch the first edition come off the stone, returning to school... ...
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0answers
6 views

“can somebody” or “can someone” [migrated]

My workmate asked me if I can arrange an airport visit for a disabled child. I want to post a message on my gliding club forum. How should I ask? Can somebody help my workmate? or Can someone help my ...
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2answers
290 views

What does this bit of Cockney mean?

In the 2nd episode of the 3rd season of Would I Lie To You?, a fragment is shown from a 1985 episode of London Weekend Television's The Six O'Clock Show, with someone purporting to be a former Teddy ...
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1answer
47 views

What do you call a client who is one of the most important for your business? [closed]

We are a small company and we treat this as an advantage. We work with a very limited number of clients, so each and every one of them is super important for us. We can't afford to screw anything up ...
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0answers
20 views

Countable nouns with a/an and the [migrated]

Task (Put in a/an or the.) I saw ... accident this morning. ... car crashed into ... tree. ... driver of ... car wasn’t hurt, but ... car was badly damaged. Answer I saw an accident this morning. A ...
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0answers
32 views

“He will be a doctor” [closed]

Am I right, interpreting these sentences? He will be a doctor= Either he is a doctor now or he will become a doctor in future. He might be a doctor= Either he is a doctor now or will become a doctor ...
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6 views

GRAMMATICALLY CORRECT OR NOT? [migrated]

I forgot to write "to" in my test, but I am not sure if it's still okay. So can you help me please? The sentence I wrote: Families let their children play games. What I supposed to write: ...
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0answers
16 views

Omitting “of” after all [duplicate]

I keep getting a suggestion from Outlook to drop "of" when it's proceeding "all". However, according to my education, that's just lazy and plain wrong. I found this answer to a ...
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2answers
145 views

Is there a more British way to talk about tackling problems?

I can see that the Cambridge Dictionary is at least aware of the use of tackle meaning "come to grips with a problem" and I can see that the Sunday Times has used it on occasion. It still ...
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0answers
27 views

“Me too” or “I too”? [duplicate]

On the club channel, someone has asked who will come on Wednesday. One of the members replied: "I will be there on Wednesday.". Which form is correct: "I too" or "Me too" ...
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0answers
4 views

What is the meaning of the word English word “ravished” in this sentence, violated or transfixed? [migrated]

I’m trying to figure out the best word in Spanish to translate the English word ravished as it’s used in the following context: There, before my ravished eye, a Cube, moving in some altogether new ...
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1answer
253 views

A digger or an academic

In one of Jeffery Archer's Prison Diary books (written ca. 2002) he asks a fellow inmate, a PhD student, whether he is "a digger or an academic". What is the meaning of "digger" in ...
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1answer
54 views

Looking for a single word for 'not meaning what you say' [closed]

I'm trying to find a word which conveys the meaning that the speaker knowingly uses empty words, or words to a specific effect, that he does not believe in. I have gone through all the possible ...
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2answers
42 views

Single word request: cancer patients' prognosis is bad (serious)

I, a non-native English speaker, am writing an academic summary in medicine and I am trying to find a word for describing that cancer patients prognosis is bad. However, "bad" isn't an ...
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0answers
19 views

Should it be 'equals' or 'equal'? [duplicate]

I was reading something and found this line. I just want to know whether the word 'equal' should be 'equals' or 'equal'? Which sentence is grammatical? At the time of settlement the cash value plus ...
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0answers
57 views

Otherwise as a Conjunction; does the second clause become a dependant clause when we use otherwise as a conditional?

If we have two independent clauses, which can stand on their own as complete sentences. When we join the two with a conditional such as "otherwise". The second clause, now headed by "...
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9answers
464 views

A better word than 'cathouse' for an outside shelter for 1 cat

Most of us who have gardens* and are fond of nature and animals have outside shelters for them... birdhouse dog house green house cat house? 'Cathouse' seems off to many Americans because of the ...
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2answers
77 views

Origin of the exact phrase “cold iron”?

Loosely inspired by this closed rpg.stackexchange question titled "What is Cold Iron actually? — Forget what it is; let's talk about the origin of the set phrase "cold iron" in English! ...
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0answers
60 views

Dialect differences between “should”, “ought”, and “ought to”

As I travel around England, Southern Wales, and Southern Scotland, I hear the rural and working-class people in some areas use "should" (and never "ought"), in other areas "...
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0answers
53 views

How would an expression like B.3/34 be pronounced, in historic or recent UK speech?

The expression is a designation for a 1930's British bomber, but the question really focuses on the ".". Would a UK speaker in the 1930's, or late 20th century, or now, say "bee full ...
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1answer
31 views

Is there any literary name attributed to 12 verse length stanza?

Not a 12 line poem, but a 12 verse stanza.
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1answer
73 views

“What went we out into this wilderness to find?” This sentence is grammatically correct. How?

"What went we out into this wilderness to find?" This is the first dialogue of the movie 'The VVitch'. I can't understand how this sentence is correct. I asked my teacher, she told me that ...
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1answer
28 views

“from the standpoint of” vs “in terms of”

I've been confused by the usage of "from the standpoint of" and "in terms of". Could anyone tell me if both of the following sentences are correct?  In terms of a high standard ...
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1answer
40 views

Capitalization of “neo-scholasticism” [duplicate]

Is the word 'neo-scholasticism' capitalized in academic writing, or not? It is lowercase in the Merriam Webster dictionary, but capitalized in the Collins English dictionary. So in a thesis, which ...
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1answer
30 views

Preposition needed: did not survive a certain timepoint [closed]

I have a sentence as follows. This should say that the patients who died during the observation period were excluded from analyses. Should I use a preposition after "survive"? I did a ...
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1answer
27 views

Is it correct to use a comma before naming a list of items in a sentence? [closed]

The question is about the first comma use in the sentences below. I have not seen such comma-punctuation in a sentence that continues with naming several listed items. Is the first comma in these ...
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0answers
36 views

Comma use in a complex sentence: independent clause combined with non-essential relative clause

I have the following sentence, where I have difficulty with the correct usage of commas. Inpatient nursing care is available for medically stable patients, who do not require constant medical ...
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0answers
17 views

Single word request: of/at that phase/time/period/care/management [duplicate]

I am writing a study aim and needs to be really concise. For background, "post-acute care" is the next/second step care in these patients' management. In other words, their care/management ...
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1answer
30 views

Dissertation: correct writing of a numbered list [closed]

Are there any grammatical rules for numbered lists (my university does not have a guideline for this)? Which format would be correct for the given example of numbered objectives? Two things that I ...
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1answer
26 views

Definite article use when writing about global population? [closed]

This is the first sentence in my work. Steadily ageing global population is leading to a crisis of noncommunicable diseases. In most cases, the first mentioning is not preceded by a definite article....
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0answers
56 views

Is [bʊt] (Northern England) analyzed as an allophone of /bʌt/?

In some/most Northern England accents, words that have [ʌ] in RP (or standard varieties of English) are pronounced with [ʊ]. So hut, cut, shut etc are pronounced with [ʌ]* in Southern British English ...
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1answer
91 views

Where do I put the period when I'm quoting?

If I quote someone, the quote ends in a period, and I end the sentence with the quote, where do I put the period? Inside the quotation marks or outside the quotation marks? I'm tempted to put a period ...
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4answers
90 views

What is the difference between “which” and "that? What should I use in the sentence? [duplicate]

What is the difference between which and that? For example, I have a sentence, They describe different methods, which their company usually practices. Which is better to use here — which or that?
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2answers
93 views

Me vs My in East Midlands dialect [duplicate]

In the dialect I grew up with (1960's Leicestershire/East Midlands), I'd say "me", when I meant "my". For example: "That's me car." vs "That's my car." What ...
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0answers
71 views

Why does ou change to o when adding the suffix -ous in words such as ‘humorous’?

Background I realised today that humour when made an adjective by adding the suffix -ous, loses its -ou- spelling to -o-. There are some other words which have a change in spelling, such as miracle → ...
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1answer
605 views

Is modern 'five countries' English the only type of English with stress patterns that change across the entire word depending on the suffix?

The capital letters represent where the main stress in each word lies TELephone, telePHONic, teLEphony. PHOTograph, photoGRAphic, photOgraphy. biOLogy, bioLOGical. What about in the past, including ...
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1answer
76 views

Is “should” + 3rd person present correct? [closed]

My colleague frequently uses "should" + 3rd person present, e.g. "It should goes ..". Notifying him about that he replied he had a British teacher and this form is correct. It was ...
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1answer
41 views

Compact writing of “1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 24 and 36-month survival was analysed”

I have an academic paper abstract to write and it has very limited word count (150 words). I have to say that we analysed 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 24 and 36-month survival of the included patients in this ...
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0answers
63 views

Could someone explain the origin and correct meaning of the phrase “wax and wane”? [closed]

Waxing and waning is a phrase less used now but more used many years ago
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1answer
90 views

Is it alright to use logical punctuation?

Since I have been writing, I have been using what I thought was just the British style of punctuation. However, I realised that it is actually called 'logical punctuation'. I have used this style of ...
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1answer
43 views

Wrong to use “less equal” in a sentence?

I would like to say that inequality increased in time as a small proportion of patients started to receive extreme amounts of rehabilitation. However, Grammarly says that I should not use "less&...
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2answers
1k views

Why did John Wells need three lexical sets--NORTH, FORCE and THOUGHT--for the same vowel /ɔː/?

The standard Lexical sets for English were introduced by professor John Wells which are widespread. Each lexical set represents a vowel present in a number of words, for example: the THOUGHT vowel /ɔː/...
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0answers
34 views

Do I need to put comma if I use “here” in the middle of a sentence?

Imagine, there is a sentence such as: The chair here can not be used. From this question, I get to know that this is a perfectly structured sentence. But should I use a comma before & after the ...
1
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1answer
41 views

When using conjunctions in a question to connect two sentences, should I add a comma before the conjunction? [duplicate]

When using conjunctions in a question to connect two sentences, should I add a comma before the conjunction? For example, Why did you leave me to be like this ,and disappear without a single trace? ...
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0answers
91 views

Is “tokenization/tokenize” written with a “z” or “s” in British English?

I can't find any examples of tokenization/tokenize written with an "s", and MS Word also corrects it to a "z" when set to UK English. Is there a reason this word does not follow ...

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