Questions tagged [british-english]

This tag is for questions related to English as spoken in Great Britain, and sometimes Ireland.

79 questions with no upvoted or accepted answers
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4
votes
2answers
669 views

Is there a difference between 'on your account' and 'on account of you'?

Consider the following sentences: Get thee hence, lest we too die on your account! Get thee hence, lest we too die on account of you! My intuition is that the two are identical in meaning, ...
3
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2answers
672 views

By which, to which, at which, to whom. are these Relative pronouns in Adjective cluase?

From experience, I know that: which, who, where, why, whom, there, that are relative pronouns but I wonder about the expressions: 'by which', 'to which', 'at which', 'to whom Are ...
3
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1answer
133 views

Van Gogh goes or Van Gogh coughs? Is there a commonly accepted British English pronunciation?

The question changed during the formulation from What is the correct 'British English' pronunciation of Van Gogh? to Is there such a thing as a 'correct' English pronunciation of a Dutch ...
3
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1answer
181 views

Losing power in the UK vs US: what's more common?

Which of the following is more common in British English vs American English? Power cut Power outage Power failure Blackout
3
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1answer
324 views

In which context should I use reduced relative clauses?

As I should write essays and other kinds of writings in an academic style, I was wondering whether reduced relative clauses are formal or I had better opt for a non-reduced relative clause so that I ...
2
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1answer
54 views

How does the pitch change through the phrase “a gorgeous young model”?

When one pronounces the phrase a gorgeous young model in a very normal way (without any special stress to emphasize a specific meaning), which word will be said in the highest pitch, which word ...
2
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1answer
42 views

Should 'known as' be followed by quotation marks?

e..g This is how he became known as 'the ape king'. or 'from then on, he became known as 'the smartest man in Britain'. Or should this be without quotation marks?
2
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3answers
90 views

Does the word “episode” apply to each individual broadcast of a TV program, no matter what the content each time?

Our studio has a one-hour TV program which runs three times a week and broadcasts different films. The content of the program is usually like the following, so can we call each broadcast an episode of ...
2
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0answers
1k views

Differences between American and British question intonation?

In interactions with American and British people, I've noted Americans tend to have rise-fall (↗↘) intonation while I've heard the British having rise-fall-rise (↗↘↗) intonation while asking questions....
2
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1answer
668 views

Endebted v. indebted: is there a difference in meaning?

I was recently told by a senior academic that I ought to replace the word indebted with endebted in an essay during which I suggest one text alludes to another. I have searched the web (no help) and ...
2
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1answer
459 views

What is the difference between Anti-national and Anti-nationalist? When is one used over the other?

Merriam-Webster dictionary shows slightly different definitions of both the terms. However, Urban-dictionary shows the definition of Anti-nationalist similar to anti-national in Merriam-Webster ...
2
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1answer
468 views

Should I put ‘there’ after ‘which’ in a given example?

Go along the street at the end of which there is the railway station.
2
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1answer
987 views

sentence structures using different degrees of adjectives

I am not a native speaker. I feel very confused whenever I write sentences like the following using comparative or positive degree.I want native speakers to guide me which of the following sentences ...
2
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1answer
2k views

Exam vs. Test (British vs. American English?)

My question is about this clip of Jimmy Kimmel Live. At 0:23, Tom Holland says: You know, you know when you revise for an exam and you feel like you crushed it, but the longer you wait for the ...
1
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1answer
30 views

The subject in sentence and use of was vs were: 'The final type of activities was organised trips'

For context, I was writing about different activities that took place during a programme. I discussed five out of six different types of activities and then said: 'The final type of activities was ...
1
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0answers
29 views

Comma between two embedded relative clauses introduced by a verb, starting with relative pronouns, and connected with a conjunction?

Consider the following sentence: But the question of how to make sure that software is written effectively(,) and at the same time that it works correctly in all cases is bothering many software ...
1
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0answers
48 views

Are email salutations regional?

Best wishes is very popular ending for emails and replaces best regards in almost all emails I've received from academics in Cambridge (UK). At the same time I've never seen this used by American ...
1
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1answer
64 views

Why do we put subject and auxiliary verbs at the end of the sentence?

Why do we put subject and auxiliary verbs e.g., have, be, do at the end of the sentence? I found this kind of sentences from a fantasy book named The last apprentice by Joseph Delany. Examples: ...
1
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0answers
12 views

“worth” with possessive(s) in coordinated nominals

According to Garner Modern English Grammar The idiomatic possessive should be used with periods of time and statements of worth — 30 days’ notice (i.e., notice of 30 days), three days’ time, ...
1
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0answers
108 views

Connected speech resources

I am very interested in British pronunciation, so I am looking for resources about connected speech and IPA in general. The ideal would be a book with the transcription of dialogues or just ...
1
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0answers
61 views

Words to call a gun?

How would someone who goes hunting/shooting a lot describe a gun? (in UK, not USA) Any casual terms that non-hunters would not know, e.g. would they refer to the make - as in I've just bought a new "...
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0answers
39 views

should do vs must do

The other day, to me great surprise I've learnt from an English native speaker that one must avoid using must in sentences and use should instead which did strike me as odd indeed because I do ...
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0answers
68 views

Using of the pronoun 'She' with Objects

While I was watching 'dinnerladies' yesterday, I noticed that they referred to 'ladder' as (she) in lieu of (it), so I wonder if it was an idiom or accent. Thanks One of the contexts was like this. ...
1
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0answers
31 views

Type of usage phrases/conjunctions

She'd lived in Seattle her whole life, grew up there. *They have got no family I know of, no children. Would these types of usage be informal only and require conjunctions in formal writing.
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0answers
49 views

Is this slogan grammatically correct?

I've been wanting to use a slogan but I don't know if it makes sense. The slogan is: Never forget 2013, the year of great elation. It sounds okay but someone told me that I need to rewrite it as "...
1
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4answers
137 views

Looking for a phrasal verb to say the hidden reason behind of several issues

I'm not even sure whether there is existence of such phrasal verb in English or not. But probably native speakers can help me out with this. All of your friend's problems are due to his recent ...
1
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0answers
69 views

Origin and usage of “wild” in “my wildest dreams”?

Collins Dictionary defines wildest dreams as: If you say that you could not imagine a particular thing in your wildest dreams, you are emphasizing that you think it is extremely strange or unlikely....
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0answers
59 views

“ booking of our sudent or for our student”? Are there any differences between American and Br english?

is there a difference between saying: "we would like to confirm the booking of our sudent or for our student"? Are there any differences between American and Br english? It's supposed to be part of ...
1
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0answers
66 views

Consistency. If I write 'recognize' with a 'z' do I have to write 'characterize' with a 'z' too?

I'm translating a book and need to keep the English orthography consistent. I'm a native 'British English' speaker. I know in British English you can often use either 'ize' or 'ise' endings. My ...
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0answers
51 views

“The earliest being” or “the earliest of which is”?

I have just received the following correction: These date back to trigonometric and logarithmic tables, the earliest of which being [is] a base-10 logarithm table from Briggs (1617). with the ...
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0answers
46 views

“Take out” or “take away” for removing from a collection?

What preposition do I have to use in this sentence? If you have ten candies and take out/away six, you are left with four. I think "out" is right. The dictionary phrases take [something] out or ...
1
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0answers
45 views

Given [supposition]

I'm going to articulate a sentence which says: "Given that our society had the technology to do it......" Is it syntactically correct? I have a couple of doubts, one related to the first ...
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0answers
85 views

Ding ding I'm on the tram

My dad would say this if I helped myself to something with out offering him any. Such as a cup of coffee. Is this an English phrase?
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0answers
66 views

How is “special rates” used in the St. Trinian's school song?

The following lyrics from "Defenders of Anarchy" on the St. Trinian's (2007) soundtrack have actually confused me for some time because I can't tell whether "special rates" is being used in a British ...
1
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0answers
510 views

Past participle used as an adjective

I found this "blog" where the point I refer to is fully explained. http://englishharmony.com/past-participle-as-adjective/ Since the moment I read it, I've been wondering if It was already ...
1
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0answers
176 views

Be + Perfect Infinitive

I was wondering if I could use this construction: The President is to have visited Italy by today I know that if I typed The President was to have + p.part. it would mean he should have but He didn'...
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0answers
100 views

A word/phrase to describe a person who attends vocational school to become a house painter/decorator

I am wondering how I could say this with just one or a few words, but I cannot seem to be able to find a correct sounding way of saying it. House painting student? House painter in training? Soon-to-...
1
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0answers
488 views

Plural form of abbreviations and using a period at the end

I was reading in Mignon Fogerty's Quickanddirtytips_When you need periods after abbreviations about the guidelines she gives covering the use of periods at the end of abbreviations ... when you should ...
1
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0answers
181 views

For how long has “as” been synonymous with “because” in British English?

In British English, it seems that "because" can always be replaced with "as." Here is an example of "as" meaning "because" in British English: I popped down to the shops as we were out of loo roll. ...
1
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1answer
48 views

Why does British English use “Collective are” and others use “Collective is”?

Since Indian English uses "Collective is" I feel British English has adopted it after the colonial days. When did countries diverge on is/are and which countries use the British system?
1
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1answer
40 views

On the double meaning of evaluation

I know that evaluation can refer to both the process and the result, but when you say something is an evaluation of another thing, like fact is evaluation of claim (forgive the choppiness, the ...
1
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1answer
121 views

From before, from aforementioned

Can before and aforementioned be used in a similar way to above? Context: Say I'm writing a report, and would like to reference an earlier bit. If that earlier bit is in close proximity or follows ...
1
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1answer
117 views

Is there a term that would work in the UK that is equivalent to “Norwegian bachelor farmer”?

Garrison Keillor introduced the term "Norwegian bachelor farmer," which is a bit like the male equivalent of spinster. Is there a male equivalent of spinster that works in the UK? I considered "...
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0answers
25 views

I found “ourselves” vs I found “us”

Looks like I found ourselves two more movies to watch. Looks like I found us two more movies to watch. Which of these two is correct? Is there a better way to put it? Context is that a friend ...
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0answers
37 views

Is it correct saying “It's mine and Peter's.” in the following context? Thanks in advance

Whose car is this? It's mine and Peter's. Improving my question to show it's not duplicate! What I want to know is if it's possible using possessive pronoun + genitive case (without a noun) to ...
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0answers
34 views

meaning of bottom

I read in a book and see this sentence "The timber clustered thick in the sheltered bottom". So, I do not know mean of "bottom" in this context. It means "furthest point" or "sky" or "the lowest part ...
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0answers
34 views

correct usage participles

The main course was nice but overcooked, smelling delicious, it consisted of steak marinated in a garlic sauce. He set out to make peace with his family, starting with his brother. Can 1. be written ...
0
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1answer
38 views

To collect someone or to pick someone - UK English

What would a receptionist say to someone having an appointment: "Please, take a seat; someone from company ABC is on the way to collect (?) you". What is more more idiomatic in a formal UK English: ...
0
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1answer
75 views

Is “really” in the sense of “very”, American English, or British English?

Or is it both? If it is American English, what would be the British English equivalent, or vice versa. "I really like this dress" as in "I very much like this dress"
0
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1answer
59 views

word similar to obfuscation, used for comedy

there is a word, or perhaps a type of comedy, where simple things are described using terms that are correct but needlessly complicated or absurd for various effects. I am reminded by comics from ...