Stack Exchange Network

Stack Exchange network consists of 175 Q&A communities including Stack Overflow, the largest, most trusted online community for developers to learn, share their knowledge, and build their careers.

Visit Stack Exchange

Questions tagged [british-english]

This tag is for questions related to English as spoken in Great Britain, and sometimes Ireland.

3
votes
1answer
169 views

Losing power in the UK vs US: what's more common?

Which of the following is more common in British English vs American English? Power cut Power outage Power failure Blackout
3
votes
1answer
293 views

In which context should I use reduced relative clauses?

As I should write essays and other kinds of writings in an academic style, I was wondering whether reduced relative clauses are formal or I had better opt for a non-reduced relative clause so that I ...
2
votes
1answer
101 views

How do you pronounce the word Shaman?

I found 2 American pronunciation samples on Forvo, and they said /ˈʃæmən/ (audio), I wonder if British people say /ˈʃeɪmən/ (audio), or not? Could you please tell me something about that?
2
votes
1answer
516 views

Endebted v. indebted: is there a difference in meaning?

I was recently told by a senior academic that I ought to replace the word indebted with endebted in an essay during which I suggest one text alludes to another. I have searched the web (no help) and ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

Exam vs. Test (British vs. American English?)

My question is about this clip of Jimmy Kimmel Live. At 0:23, Tom Holland says: You know, you know when you revise for an exam and you feel like you crushed it, but the longer you wait for the ...
2
votes
1answer
438 views

What is the difference between Anti-national and Anti-nationalist? When is one used over the other?

Merriam-Webster dictionary shows slightly different definitions of both the terms. However, Urban-dictionary shows the definition of Anti-nationalist similar to anti-national in Merriam-Webster ...
2
votes
1answer
390 views

Should I put ‘there’ after ‘which’ in a given example?

Go along the street at the end of which there is the railway station.
2
votes
1answer
953 views

sentence structures using different degrees of adjectives

I am not a native speaker. I feel very confused whenever I write sentences like the following using comparative or positive degree.I want native speakers to guide me which of the following sentences ...
1
vote
1answer
44 views

Why does British English use “Collective are” and others use “Collective is”?

Since Indian English uses "Collective is" I feel British English has adopted it after the colonial days. When did countries diverge on is/are and which countries use the British system?
2
votes
0answers
990 views

Differences between American and British question intonation?

In interactions with American and British people, I've noted Americans tend to have rise-fall (↗↘) intonation while I've heard the British having rise-fall-rise (↗↘↗) intonation while asking questions....
1
vote
0answers
39 views

Are email salutations regional?

Best wishes is very popular ending for emails and replaces best regards in almost all emails I've received from academics in Cambridge (UK). At the same time I've never seen this used by American ...
1
vote
0answers
11 views

“worth” with possessive(s) in coordinated nominals

According to Garner Modern English Grammar The idiomatic possessive should be used with periods of time and statements of worth — 30 days’ notice (i.e., notice of 30 days), three days’ time, ...
1
vote
0answers
106 views

Connected speech resources

I am very interested in British pronunciation, so I am looking for resources about connected speech and IPA in general. The ideal would be a book with the transcription of dialogues or just ...
1
vote
0answers
61 views

Words to call a gun?

How would someone who goes hunting/shooting a lot describe a gun? (in UK, not USA) Any casual terms that non-hunters would not know, e.g. would they refer to the make - as in I've just bought a new "...
1
vote
0answers
32 views

should do vs must do

The other day, to me great surprise I've learnt from an English native speaker that one must avoid using must in sentences and use should instead which did strike me as odd indeed because I do ...
1
vote
0answers
58 views

Using of the pronoun 'She' with Objects

While I was watching 'dinnerladies' yesterday, I noticed that they referred to 'ladder' as (she) in lieu of (it), so I wonder if it was an idiom or accent. Thanks One of the contexts was like this. ...
1
vote
0answers
29 views

Type of usage phrases/conjunctions

She'd lived in Seattle her whole life, grew up there. *They have got no family I know of, no children. Would these types of usage be informal only and require conjunctions in formal writing.
1
vote
0answers
47 views

Is this slogan grammatically correct?

I've been wanting to use a slogan but I don't know if it makes sense. The slogan is: Never forget 2013, the year of great elation. It sounds okay but someone told me that I need to rewrite it as "...
1
vote
0answers
59 views

Origin and usage of “wild” in “my wildest dreams”?

Collins Dictionary defines wildest dreams as: If you say that you could not imagine a particular thing in your wildest dreams, you are emphasizing that you think it is extremely strange or unlikely....
1
vote
0answers
42 views

“ booking of our sudent or for our student”? Are there any differences between American and Br english?

is there a difference between saying: "we would like to confirm the booking of our sudent or for our student"? Are there any differences between American and Br english? It's supposed to be part of ...
1
vote
0answers
63 views

Consistency. If I write 'recognize' with a 'z' do I have to write 'characterize' with a 'z' too?

I'm translating a book and need to keep the English orthography consistent. I'm a native 'British English' speaker. I know in British English you can often use either 'ize' or 'ise' endings. My ...
1
vote
0answers
34 views

“The earliest being” or “the earliest of which is”?

I have just received the following correction: These date back to trigonometric and logarithmic tables, the earliest of which being [is] a base-10 logarithm table from Briggs (1617). with the ...
1
vote
0answers
44 views

“Take out” or “take away” for removing from a collection?

What preposition do I have to use in this sentence? If you have ten candies and take out/away six, you are left with four. I think "out" is right. The dictionary phrases take [something] out or ...
1
vote
0answers
41 views

Given [supposition]

I'm going to articulate a sentence which says: "Given that our society had the technology to do it......" Is it syntactically correct? I have a couple of doubts, one related to the first ...
1
vote
0answers
76 views

Ding ding I'm on the tram

My dad would say this if I helped myself to something with out offering him any. Such as a cup of coffee. Is this an English phrase?
1
vote
0answers
65 views

How is “special rates” used in the St. Trinian's school song?

The following lyrics from "Defenders of Anarchy" on the St. Trinian's (2007) soundtrack have actually confused me for some time because I can't tell whether "special rates" is being used in a British ...
1
vote
0answers
475 views

Past participle used as an adjective

I found this "blog" where the point I refer to is fully explained. http://englishharmony.com/past-participle-as-adjective/ Since the moment I read it, I've been wondering if It was already ...
1
vote
0answers
175 views

Be + Perfect Infinitive

I was wondering if I could use this construction: The President is to have visited Italy by today I know that if I typed The President was to have + p.part. it would mean he should have but He didn'...
1
vote
0answers
93 views

A word/phrase to describe a person who attends vocational school to become a house painter/decorator

I am wondering how I could say this with just one or a few words, but I cannot seem to be able to find a correct sounding way of saying it. House painting student? House painter in training? Soon-to-...
1
vote
0answers
445 views

Plural form of abbreviations and using a period at the end

I was reading in Mignon Fogerty's Quickanddirtytips_When you need periods after abbreviations about the guidelines she gives covering the use of periods at the end of abbreviations ... when you should ...
1
vote
0answers
181 views

For how long has “as” been synonymous with “because” in British English?

In British English, it seems that "because" can always be replaced with "as." Here is an example of "as" meaning "because" in British English: I popped down to the shops as we were out of loo roll. ...
0
votes
0answers
43 views

Do you stick to the original spelling of a name regardless of British or American spelling?

For example, NATO stands for "North Atlantic Treaty Organization", which is an intergovernmental military alliance between 29 North American and European countries, hence the American spelling of "...
0
votes
0answers
20 views

What does “break out the gavel ”mean?

In hopeless by coleen hoover sky says she will eventually "break out the gavel " any guesses what she means?
0
votes
0answers
19 views

Usage with conjunctions

She bought one for her, one for him. She bought one for her, and one for him The horse ran out of the gate, across the field. The horse ran out of the gate and across the field. Are the ...
0
votes
0answers
31 views

Cambridge English Proficiency tests

I am looking for CPE tests, however I could just find very few of them online: I merely found: http://www.cambridgeenglish.org/images/168194-cambridge-english-proficiency-teachers-handbook.pdf Do you ...
0
votes
0answers
62 views

Is it grammatical in British English to ask “what pound is it?” instead of “how many pounds is it?”

I’ve often times heard people say, “what pound is it?”, instead of “how many pounds is it?” We all understand that anything over 1 pound is plural. Two pounds, three pounds, etc. But could this be ...
0
votes
0answers
37 views

What does the headline sentence “Top Judges Meet Today On Appointment Rejected By Government” convey? Is there a better way to rephrase this?

A leading Indian news website has this headline today - "Top Judges Meet Today On Appointment Rejected By Government" How would a reader, who lacks context, interpret this? The top judges are going ...
0
votes
0answers
45 views

Is this a British-English term? What is the correct usage?

Is it ok to write, "Please let me know where you are holding," if you want to ask after a client (in terms of where he stand in the decision-making process)? You wouldn't say it in American English. ...
0
votes
0answers
59 views

Use of the word “petrol” as a solvent in British English?

In the clip below from YouTube, the narrator refers to the can of liquid solvent shown below as "petrol": However, this container looks like the type we use in America to store what is commonly known ...
0
votes
0answers
114 views

“Psychological disposition of car ownership” - is that a term?

I am searching for a term to describe the following: The psychological value that is attached to car ownership. The context: I am doing a research towards carsharing and writing about factors that ...
0
votes
0answers
63 views

Is the phrase 'TV show' (for series) often used in English language varieties other than American English?

I am aware of the common use of the phrase 'TV show' (for series, usually of several seasons) in American English. I am not really interested in elaborations on other terms (series, season, programme, ...
0
votes
0answers
50 views

Jack…Roger… All must die?

From Call of Duty: Black Ops: "Dragovich.... Kravechenko.... Steiner..... All Must Die !" "Dragovich.... Kravechenko.... Steiner.... These "Men" Must die !" In the Lord Of The Flies, there ...
0
votes
0answers
241 views

is the sentence “The analysis shall be carried out by responsible participants” correct?

Is the following sentence correct: The analysis shall be carried out by responsible participants. Or should it be this: Responsible participants shall perform the analysis.
0
votes
0answers
45 views

“You can” vs. “You can do”

When asking a question like "Can I add you to this list?" the answer might be (among other things) "You can" or "You can do". It seems that the same person might answer with either form depending on ...
0
votes
0answers
39 views

Is there a rule for -ency and -ence?

Both of frequence and frequency seem to be right, but the -ency version may be preferred. I hear more about consistency and convergence more than consistence and convergency. So, am I right, and is ...
0
votes
0answers
123 views

A word for someone (or something?) that is totally different from how they (or it) appear?

I'm looking for a word to describe someone who is totally different to the impression they give? It is actually one of my son's teachers whom I am looking to describe. He comes across very gruff and ...
-1
votes
0answers
12 views

usage with preposition and subordinate clauses

The performer died after falling ill on stage. This was thought by the audience to be a part of the act, until emergency services were called in, the audience was evacuated, and he was declared dead ...
-1
votes
0answers
96 views

Help!! Word or phrase that is said at the end of a sentence to indicate that the reality of it is worse

I know that the title isn't that great or descriptive, but let me explain what I meant by that. You know those words or phrases that you say at the end of a sentence, like 'so to speak', I believe ...
-1
votes
0answers
232 views

Missing “are” verb in sentence

I saw the following sentence in a pop-up warning which, I think is missing the "are" verb after the "computer" noun. You cannot continue because your robot and computer disconnected. It certainly ...
-2
votes
0answers
27 views

Redundancy errors

I have got a query on the differences between the usage of describe and tell about. To the best of my knowledge, normally describe and about won’t come together as describe itself means tell about. ...