Questions tagged [biology]

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2
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2answers
157 views

Why does the name “central nervous system” contain 'nervous' and not 'nerves'? [closed]

I was searching for something related the central nervous system, and then it hit me: why is it called "the central nervous system" and not "the central nerves system"? It is ...
0
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1answer
68 views

Illustrating “vicious”, “rapacious”, “ferocious” and “voracious”

As a non-native speaker who grew up in an area without dangerous animals, I find myself confused by the distinctions between these words: vicious rapacious ferocious - example voracious In the ...
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0answers
28 views

Does “One example of that would be it's trophic cascade” make sense?

I'm trying to write a paragraph for a question for my biology class. The question is "How are organisms (and non-living things) interconnected within Serengeti National Park? He wants us to include "...
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0answers
27 views

Relation of the etymology of «epilepsy» and «cataplexy» to their meaning

I want to know the exact meaning of these 2 words (they are a medical words ... I know their scientific meaning, I need the relation of their etymology to their meaning) the prefix and the suffix of ...
0
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1answer
53 views

What does the following statement by Richard Dawkins mean?

I am reading “The Selfish Gene” by Richard Dawkins in which the writer has to say this: ‘Welfare’ is defined as ‘chances of survival’, even if the effect on actual life and death prospects is so ...
4
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2answers
126 views

Is there a term for the combination of a finger bone (phalanx) plus all the soft tissue around that bone?

I originally asked this on the Biology site, but someone pointed me towards this site in their answer for a full-on word request stating this site might be more helpful in that regard. I was ...
2
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1answer
93 views

Etymology of the scientific term “tomont”

What is the etymology of the scientific term "tomont", referring to a life stage of certain parasitic organisms such as Cryptocaryon irritans? The Oxford English Dictionary has an entry for a ...
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0answers
46 views

Hypernym for plant, insect, and fungus

What noun encompasses all three of these: a plant, fungus, or insect.
1
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1answer
59 views

Term for the saline equilibrium of the body?

There is a term for the balanced percentage level of salt in the body, but I can't remember what it is. It is not eutectic, but it is a word like that. The X level of salts in the human body is 0.9%.
4
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3answers
189 views

Pronotum: meaning and suffix context?

Pronotum The pronotum (Biology) is a prominent plate-like structure that covers all or part of the thorax of some insects. The pronotum covers the dorsal surface of the thorax. The word can be ...
0
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2answers
114 views

When should antibody/antigen be pluralised?

I am doing my thesis corrections, and my examiner (an engineer) has different ideas about whether the word should be pluralised than those I am used to, as I am a non-biochemist, I wanted advice on ...
24
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4answers
5k views

Is there a familial term for apples and pears?

The term Citrus Fruit covers oranges, lemons, and grapefruits; all of which are very similar in skin & flesh. Is there a similar term to cover apples and pears (outside of Cockney rhyming slang)? ...
3
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1answer
50 views

Classification of species into native or invasive

In conservation efforts, whether a species is native or invasive to a particular area is often of interest. There are also sometimes additional classifications. For example, I'm working with a data ...
0
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2answers
1k views

If an animal is not a predator (e.g. a herbivore), but has nothing that eats it, what is it called? [duplicate]

Most animals I have heard of, such as killer whales, great white sharks, and other apex predators are, well, predators. But what would you call an apex non-predator?
0
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1answer
187 views

Interpretation of OR

Consider the sentence, "ribosomes are attached to the outside of the endoplasmic reticulum or nuclear envelope." Interpretation A - "ribosomes are attached to the OUTSIDE of the endoplasmic reticulum ...
0
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1answer
258 views

What does “Infertile, Offspring Viable,” mean? How does that work? [closed]

Yesterday I saw the sentence "Infertile, Offspring Viable" What does that even mean? If the parents are infertile, then they can't have produced children in the first place. Does this have a ...
-2
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1answer
690 views

Where did the Greeks get their word “bio” from? [closed]

Is it possible that it comes from the junction of the word: "bi" and the Greek letter" "Omega", literally translating to "two of everything"?
2
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1answer
4k views

Is there an anatomical word that includes both hands and feet?

I'm looking for a word that fills in the missing blank in the following progression: Arms and legs are collectively called extremities Hands and feet are collectively called _______ Fingers and Toes ...
5
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3answers
567 views

What is a scientific term for a “game trail”

I've been trying to find scientific research concerning animals' tendency to adhere to certain worn paths, or "game trails". However, I have found very little and suspect the problem to be that a ...
5
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2answers
10k views

What caused bell peppers to be called capsicums in some countries?

I have read this answer on the question "Why is the word “pepper” used for both capsicum (e.g. bell pepper) and piper (e.g. black pepper)?", and it contains some useful etymological information. I've ...
10
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1answer
582 views

What were Red Admiral and White Admiral butterflies called before 1627?

The Red Admiral (Vanessa atalanta) and White Admiral (Limenitis camilla) butterfly species cannot have had those common names before 1627, when the English Navy (the predecessor of the Royal Navy) was ...
3
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1answer
3k views

Does “pro-” always precede “pre-” in a sequence? Why?

In biological vocabulary, sometimes both pre- and pro- are used as prefixes to indicate something earlier in a sequence. For example, pro-B cells develop into pre-B cells, which eventually develop ...
5
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5answers
449 views

Word that means “automatic gain control” (not homeostasis or equilibrium)?

I'm looking for a word that refers, in biology, to a negative feedback loop similar to automatic gain control. Equilibrium is the state reached when competing forces balance out to a steady state. ...
3
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2answers
3k views

General technical term that uncontroversially encompasses both bacteria and viruses

We can speak of "microbes" or "micro-organisms," and I used to think that these terms clearly included viruses. And they are used this way by at least some other people; here's a website that refers ...
3
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1answer
916 views

Do fish smell or taste blood in water?

Which is the right verb to use? Is smelling as a verb strictly connected with air or what fish do is also called smelling? I ruled out "detect" as it sounds too formal, or is it?
0
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1answer
146 views

endophyte studies OR the studies of endophytes?

Which is better to describe research into microorganism, especially fungi: endophyte studies or the study of endophytes?
21
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5answers
5k views

How did “lobster” mean two different species?

This live crustacean is called astice in Italian. The one on the right is aragosta. They look very different from one another. The Italian dictionary describes the astice as having a deep (intense) ...
6
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4answers
2k views

Why is it a “gene pool”?

Isn't it a bit odd to say that genes belong to or are a part of a "pool"? A pool is normally a body of water, e.g. a swimming pool Wikipedia explains The gene pool is the set of all genes, or ...
-2
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1answer
5k views

What is the bone at both sides of the human head called? [closed]

I know the bone at the rear of the human head is occiput, how are those at the sides called?
1
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1answer
377 views

Correct spelling for BOD and DO

What is the correct way to spell "biochemical oxygen demand" and "dissolved oxygen" in the middle of a sentence? Should the initial letters be capitalized?
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4answers
1k views

Why does binomial nomenclature seem to break case rules?

According to the Wiki page for binomial nomenclature, we are supposed to capitalize the first word when naming species regardless of where it occurs in the sentence. To me, this seem very incongruous ...
4
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1answer
223 views

Where does “acutilobate” originate from?

I see the claim that acutilobate is a “dictionary-only” word, for example seen in the 1913 Webster’s dictionary. How would a word get into a dictionary that only appears in dictionaries and is not ...
1
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2answers
378 views

In which context is “lignicolous” used?

Is lignicolous a word used in a specific context, or is it common to say "that is a lignicolous bug"?