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Questions tagged [auxiliary-verbs]

An auxiliary verb modifies the main verb to give more information about the main verb.

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7 votes
1 answer
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Adverbs in the mid-position when there is more than one verb

I am doing a worksheet about adverbs. For adverbs of certainty like 'probably' and 'definitely', it says that they go in the mid-position and it gives this rule: "mid: before main verb; if the ...
Rosie's user avatar
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1 answer
136 views

Do auxiliary verbs have a meaning / an intrinsic meaning?

Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_auxiliary_verbs): English auxiliary verbs are a small set of English verbs, which include the English modal auxiliary verbs and a few others. Although ...
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3 votes
1 answer
278 views

Is "used" an auxiliary verb in this sentence?

She used to be a varsity athlete. In a grammar book, the above sentence was listed among sentences containing at least one auxiliary verb. If "used" is indeed the auxiliary verb, can an ...
cookie234's user avatar
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6 votes
1 answer
821 views

Is "don't" a particle of its own?

I noticed an oddity in the sentence Why don't you just do it?: Although I always thought of don't simply as of a short form of do not it seems to me as if this is not the case in this sentence. ...
Jonathan Herrera's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
50 views

...can you say that you won’t and haven’t sold Pegasus to [ellipsis]

Is this kind of elliptical construction used widely? SHALEV: I’m not gonna talk about specific customer. LESLEY: But can you say that you won’t and haven’t sold Pegasus to a country that is known to ...
Quirkier's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
172 views

Why isn't "I had to" contracted to "I'd to" unlike other auxiliary usage of the verb "had"?

We say "I had to leave," but not "I'd to leave." Why? This is also unlike other auxiliary usage of the verb "had" (e.g. in past perfect tense), so the difference is more ...
nayfaan's user avatar
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4 votes
4 answers
215 views

Can the second auxiliary be omitted in sentences like "...but she may (have)"?

a. I don’t think she has seen it, but she may (have). b. This one needs to be repaired; the other already has (been). Can you omit the second auxiliary? If so, is it more natural to omit it? These ...
listeneva's user avatar
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Static have or dynamic have in "I had the staff do a thorough search" [duplicate]

I need to know if "had" is static or dynamic in the following clause. I had the staff do a thorough search. I know that if the verb have is marking possession or obligation, some speakers ...
noorav's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
73 views

When the verb dare is an auxiliary, can it take the preterite form dared?

I need to distinguish the auxiliary dare and the lexical dare. I know that as semi-modals need and dare act similarly. As a modal the verb need can only have present tense forms without the 3rd person ...
noorav's user avatar
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1 answer
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Why isn't this an auxiliary verb? [closed]

THE EXERCISE: "I told my mother that my thoughts were bent upon seeing the world that I should never settle to anything with resolution enough to go through with it, and my father should be ...
Dee's user avatar
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1 answer
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Omission of Auxiliaries [closed]

I have heard this sentence, said by somebody: Okay, let's check your homework. Sentence 1... correct, sentence 2... also correct, sentence 3 correct as well, and sentence 4... correct, too. Now, I'...
user473457's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
56 views

Who I've sold your cats *are/is* those people [closed]

I have already posted questions about wh-cleft verb agreement, but after having watched all the links you'd graciously provided, I was able to find no answer that'd explain which verb to use in this ...
Mr realtor's user avatar
-1 votes
2 answers
68 views

What we sold yesterday was/were a cat and oxen [duplicate]

Which is correct in my sentence? No-one really seems to have ever posted such a sophisticated question. What we sold yesterday was/were a cat and three oxen.
Mr realtor's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
46 views

Sentence start with auxiliary-verb

Only after the journal transaction has been committed in this fashion can the kernel do the real metadata writes at its leisure; should the system crash in the middle, the information needed to safely ...
Edwin's user avatar
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2 answers
269 views

Can "may have" be used in a past-tense narrative?

In a narrative written in third person past tense, such as you'd find in most published books, can the phrase "may have" be used after verbs like "thought" or "said"? As ...
seadeepy's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
16 views

Which verb to use with "pair of X" [duplicate]

Which of the following is correct: Every pair of two different people are of different countries. Every pair of two different people is of different countries.
Median Hilal's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
75 views

"I'll have take contact you two about the details later" [closed]

"I'll have take contact you two about the details later" I read this sentence in a manga and I was baffled as to what kind of grammatical function have is playing here. Is it an aspectual ...
Zoltan's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
62 views

Is there a term for, and what is the correctness of, splitting a verb with a nonrestrictive clause?

This is a question about splitting a verb with a clause, not a word. Thus, it's similar to but different from usual verb splitting. Or, rather, I'm wondering if it's different enough to have its own ...
landru27's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
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Wouldst thou like or likest?

The phrase "wouldst thou like" seems more appropriate to me, for the following reason: As far as I know, "thou wilt like" is correct, and "thou wilt likest" is not, ...
GPWR's user avatar
  • 111
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1 answer
711 views

Omitting auxiliary verbs

Native speakers often tend to simplify their language, for example they shorten phrases ("I would like to" becomes "I'd like to", etc.). Taking this into account, do native English ...
Daniel's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
271 views

Are causative verbs auxiliary verbs?

I can't seem to find any definitive information on this topic, as most sources simply say "these are called causative verbs" and leave it at that. To my mind, they act like auxiliary verbs ...
Alex's user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
234 views

Can the auxiliary verb do/does/did replace a transitive verb?

In Ariana Grande's song off the table there's the verse: Will I ever love somebody like the way I did you? Can we use the auxiliary verb to replace a transitive verb like "love"? For ...
Patrícia Kataoka's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
48 views

Does this sentence sound weird and unnatural? If so, what do you think is a better/correct sentence structure? [closed]

It seems this would be the last time we will talk about this. I don't get the auxiliary verbs (would, will) used in the sentence above. Isn't it better to say, "It seems this would be the last ...
768's user avatar
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5 votes
3 answers
324 views

"Have you?" vs "do you?" in awkward sentence

This question arises from a debate between friends about what is "technically" more correct in this sentence: "You don't happen to have read <book name>, do you?" Should ...
Rhys van der Waerden's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
108 views

Use of ‘had’ in Indian English

Soon after she encountered the experience while proceeding to New Delhi, the Thoothukudi MP had tweeted, “Today at the airport a CISF officer asked me if I am an Indian, when I asked her to speak to ...
Virat's user avatar
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1 answer
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What should be the correct auxiliary verb, did or do? [duplicate]

Which one is correct, “if you ever did it again?” or “if you ever do it again?” The act has already been done once by a character A, much to character B’s dislike. Now, if B warns A not to repeat the ...
Trusha_Patel's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
87 views

Placement of the auxiliary verb within a sentence

When using do as auxiliary verb for emphasis, could one swap it around in a sentence or not? For example, Do please check the details beforehand. Please do check the details beforehand. Are both ...
user405662's user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
211 views

Will vs Would? Can both of them be used for future [closed]

I doubt she will do anything. I doubt she would do anything. Which one is grammatically correct? Please also mention if there is any grammatical error in the following sentence: "The lady ...
whatshappening's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
96 views

How many auxiliary verbs does the sentence below have?

I had a disagreement with someone about the sentence below. "The homework has been completed". A friend said there aren't two auxiliaries but as I see it, there are three verbs: has, been, ...
kandyman's user avatar
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0 answers
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Are there terms to distinguish the auxiliary verbs in a multi-auxiliary verb phrase?

In phrase constructions that include multiple auxiliary verbs, as in "he has been sleeping all day", is there terminology commonly used to distinguish them? For example, might you call the ...
tangosquared's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
2k views

In the phrase, "it better be good", what part of speech is ”better”?

Clearly the verb in the sentence in "it better be good" is "be", but what is "better"? Is it an auxiliary or an adverb?
tangosquared's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
24 views

dare I say (it) [duplicate]

used when you are saying something that you think other people may not like This famous novel is a little, dare I say it, dull. https://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/british/dare-i-say-it Is ...
GJC's user avatar
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0 answers
35 views

Inversion without auxiliary verb? [duplicate]

It's pretty normal when people use inversion in a sentence like this one (with the aux verb at the front): "In no way do I agree with what you're saying." But I'm not sure if these belong to ...
Gi Han's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
331 views

The Auxiliary “Be” in the King James Bible

The King James Bible has Job 30:2 as “Yea, whereto might the strength of their hands profit me, in whom old age was perished?” which I understood to mean, “What use are their hands to me, men whose ...
David Marlowe's user avatar
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0 answers
168 views

the auxiliary “need” (in affirmative sentences?)

I remember being told the modal “need” is used only in interrogative and negative sentences and was for quite a long time more idiomatic than the normal forms, but is there anything wrong with the ...
David Marlowe's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
79 views

Auxiliary verb reduction in not only - but also structure

I was wondering if it is correct to reduce the auxiliary verb of a not only - but also sentence that has multiple clauses sharing that same auxiliary verb, for example: Not only did I finish my ...
Dxml's user avatar
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0 answers
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Can an auxiliary verb (i.e. "has") be used outside a verb phrase, with the same meaning?

Lets use the word "has" as an example. We can say "he has done his work", where "has" is an auxililary verb for the main verb "done". There is also another way ...
kepe's user avatar
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0 answers
63 views

Which one would be correct to use in a poetic way?

Can I make an interrogative sentence without using any Helping Verb? For instance: Blood is sticking onto the attire on my body; now what my pocket needs for darning? I want to say my pocket ...
Jay Ho's user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
1k views

NICE Properties of Auxiliary Verbs

BACKGROUND According to this ThoughtCo. article titled "NICE Properties of Auxiliary Verbs": NICE is an acronym for the four syntactic characteristics that distinguish auxiliary verbs from ...
JK2's user avatar
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-1 votes
1 answer
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"These children were abducted by a member of their own family." vs. "These children were abducted by members of their own families."

I'm having trouble figuring out which sentence is the most acceptable. The subject and object are both plural, but it sounds more natural using a singular object. Also, I can't figure out if the ...
Tommy O'Neill's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
377 views

Is there an alternative grammar term for 'auxiliary (verb)'?

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language consistently uses the term "auxiliary (verb)" to refer to be, have, do, will/can/may/must, etc., but CGEL doesn't treat auxiliaries as mere assistants (i....
JK2's user avatar
  • 6,573
1 vote
1 answer
115 views

Is this "dare" an auxiliary verb or a lexical one?

I am studying auxiliary verbs, and I saw that "to dare" is a modal auxiliary. However, this sentence is somehow confusing: He does not dare to interrupt. My question is: Is "to dare&...
Abdelbasset's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
43 views

Confusion in the selection of Verb/Auxiliary Verb

Below are the sentences 1) from scientific Journal 2) from a book. Since both are published text, however, my confined knowledge makes me ask this question. In 1) sentence two things are mentioned "...
Shane's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
57 views

Is “are just can't” correct?

Some curves are just can't be flattened. Shouldn't it just be "Some curves just can't be flattened"? Asking for corrections and suggestions. Thanks in advance.
Matthew Sanchez's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
83 views

Distribution of auxiliary verb over infinitives

I have a doubt regarding the use of auxiliary verb. When we use an auxiliary verb in a sentence , and suppose it does two tasks and we join them using ,say, 'and' , Is there a need for us to repeat ...
Mathlearner Renrael Htam's user avatar
5 votes
4 answers
2k views

What is the history of "may" being used to mean "must"?

According to (online) Merriam-Webster, "may" has the following two distinct definitions, among others 1 b: have permission to 4: SHALL, MUST —used in law where the sense, purpose, or policy ...
B Chen's user avatar
  • 573
1 vote
1 answer
507 views

Weak or strong? Auxiliary verbs + not/been and dummy subject there

I read somewhere that auxiliary verbs are always strong (stressed or pronounced with full vowels) when combined with not. I'm not talking about contractions but when they're fully enunciated: You are ...
Jeremiah's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
3k views

“Oh boy, do I love it!” What kind of grammatical structure is this?

I think I’ve heard some people express their enthusiasm/strong emotion by starting a sentence with a verb as in a question form. How common is this and for what kind of sentence will it be awkward to ...
CWC's user avatar
  • 183
1 vote
2 answers
137 views

What is the grammar of "CJ Dennis had 2 edit suggestions approved"?

I'm trying to explain the grammar of CJ Dennis had 2 edit suggestions approved to other people, however, the more I try to explain it, the more confused I get about it myself. The context is from ...
CJ Dennis's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
92 views

When do we use this construction? Auxiliary verb + subject + verb

I was trying to find some info about this construction but couldn't succeed, although I happen to encounter it here and there almost every day. So the construction is: auxiliary verb + subject + verb. ...
heading_west's user avatar

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