Questions tagged [attributive-nouns]

An attributive noun, also called a noun adjunct, refers to a noun placed before another noun to modify it, like "dog" in "dog catcher" and "dog food", "heart" in "heart surgery", "running" in "running shoes", "employee" in "employee compensation", and "Peter" in "Peter Principle". It is an alternative to a prepositional phrase, like "food for dogs" or "surgery of the heart". You can use a predicate test to distinguish a noun adjunct from an adjective.

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1answer
75 views

“state's secrets” vs. “state secrets” [closed]

Is it state's secrets or state secret? I am always confused when I try to put " 's " to things . I have read answers about use of the possessive apostrophe but I am not sure whether this should be: ...
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1answer
131 views

“Footsteps Sounds” or “Footstep Sounds”

I have a friend who wants to title his thesis "Footsteps Sounds". I don't think this sounds right but I can't explain why. To me it should be "Footstep Sounds". Are both correct with different ...
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145 views

Value of time vs time value [duplicate]

I want a compensation equal to the value of my time. I was told by a native speaker that this is the correct expression (instead of saying equal to my time value), but I don't know why. Could ...
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1answer
122 views

Why is the phrase “coal country” uncountable in this sentence? Does it mean a particular region?

Why is the phrase "coal country" uncountable in this sentence? Does it mean a particular region? Were he frustrated in Congress, the president would surely fall back on areas where he has a free ...
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0answers
38 views

Should it be “clotted cream scones” or “clotted-cream scones”? [duplicate]

I'm eating clotted cream-covered scones. or I'm eating clotted-cream-covered scones. or I'm eating clotted cream covered scones. Formally, I thought they'd have to be clotted-cream scones, ...
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1answer
2k views

Weekend Celebrations or Weekend's Celebrations [duplicate]

Imagine a wedding invitation which ends with the following sentence: To round off the weekend celebrations, please join us for lunch. Would it be more, less, or equally correct to say: To round ...
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2answers
210 views

Stop engaging in “eating disorder behaviors” or “eating disordered behaviors”? [closed]

Which sentence is more grammatically correct? We'd like you to refrain from engaging in eating disorder behaviors this week. We'd like you to refrain from engaging in eating disordered ...
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1answer
808 views

what does “whiplash moment” mean?

I'm currently reading a New York Times article about the relationship change between the U.S. and Russia after the election of Mr. Trump. I came across the following: “We are in a whiplash moment ...
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1answer
82 views

“mammal exhibit” vs. “ mammals exhibit” vs. “mammals' exhibit” [duplicate]

Ok, I'm writing a story where the character visits a museum. Does she visit: the mammal exhibit the mammals exhibit the mammals' exhibit
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1answer
62 views

“Window replacement company” or “Windows replacement company” [duplicate]

My client says: "We are a trusted windows and doors replacement company." It sounds funny. It seems like it should be singular: window and door. Although, if it is part of the name "Acme Windows ...
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1answer
380 views

Nouns vs. nouns used as adjectives [duplicate]

Given the following sentence: You should always use prefixes with your table names Is the word table properly labeled as a noun or an adjective, as it is functioning as an adjective but the base ...
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2answers
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Six feet/foot five: Does adding “inches” affect the grammatical form of “foot”?

Is it possible to say "six feet five" (inches are left out here)? Or is "six foot five" the only correct variant? Does incluing "inches" affect the grammatical form of "foot"?
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1answer
401 views

Which of “game names” and “games names” is correct? [duplicate]

What it's supposed to designate: A list of the name of each game. So there are multiple games and therefore multiple names. But should either or both take an s at the end in a list of game(s) name(...
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1answer
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What is the grammatically correct: “Languages Services” or “Language Services”? [duplicate]

Is "Languages Services" correct for when you offer multiple services for multiple languages? Or should it still be "Language Services"? Why? Thank you guys!
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1answer
694 views

Should hyphens go between these examples?

I understand that we usually don't use hyphens when the meaning is clear (e.g- noise-cancelling headphones). I am just a bit confused when the hyphen is put between just two words instead of more ...
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1answer
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“Attributive Noun” vs “ Compound Noun”

What's the difference between an "attributive and a compound noun"? Some English sites say it's all but thee same and some sites say they're different. Compound : In a compound noun all the words ...
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1answer
344 views

Noun adjunct vs. Possessive apostrophe [duplicate]

If I run a company for children, do I run a children's company a children company a childrens company I originally thought "children's company" was correct but the children are not in possession ...
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5answers
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A synonym for “total” with a negative connotation

I'm looking for a synonym for "total", as in sum of multiple of parts, but with a negative connotation. The context is that a man finds all his sins combined—his total—in tangible form. My first ...
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1answer
408 views

“Automata theory” vs. “automaton theory”

The theory of groups is called group theory, not groups theory; the theory of functions is function theory, not functions theory; the theory of lattices is lattice theory, and so on. How come the ...
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2answers
5k views

What determines how 'cursed' (as an attributive adjective) is pronounced?

'Cursed' can be pronouced '/kɜːrst/' or '/ˈkɜːrsɪd/'. As far as I am aware, when used as the past tense of the verb 'to curse' it is always the former ('He stubbed his toe and cursed'). When used as ...
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4answers
327 views

Nouns as adjectives

Nouns can be used as adjectives modifying other nouns, like: The discussion was about supplier local content development. Can we rephrase the above to: The discussion was about local content ...
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1answer
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Use of “s” in two consecutive words

I was doing my online banking and reading through their material, when I noticed a blurb " we offer you a wide range of savings account and fixed deposit products and services.....". Should this not ...
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3answers
631 views

What is the name of a person who likes high quality items?

What is the name of a person who likes high quality items, not necessarily the most expensive, but the best for the money perhaps.
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2answers
83 views

How do I choose between a noun and a participle when picking one to use as an adjective?

I know that I can use both a noun and a participle as an adjective but what do I have to ask myself when choosing between them? For instance: Talking points, talk points Information ...
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1answer
92 views

Is an adjective/noun adjunct carried by reference with the word “another”

I am looking for the best interpretation of the phrase: ... if one structured property contains another, only one of them can be repeated. Which is central to a StackOverflow question. In ...
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2answers
871 views

Is “star wars” equivalent to “wars of the stars” ? Then how about “world war”? [duplicate]

I have some questions: Why "star wars" and not "stars wars"? Is "star wars" equivalent to "wars of the stars"? In French it would be "les guerres des etoiles", what about the English version? If ...
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1answer
154 views

Number of genitive object in a nominal compound [duplicate]

Which of the following options is better? Do the two choices reflect any difference in meaning? "Matters regarding comments deletion" or "Matters regarding comment deletion" --Assuming the ...
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1answer
588 views

is it “mice infested” or “mouse infested”?

You would say "rat infested" but would you say "mouse infested" or "mice infested"? Sidenote: I think we would say "mouse infestation" so I'm assuming we would also say "louse infestation" as ...
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1answer
331 views

“A of B” or “B A” Noun Adjunct vs. Prepositional Phrase

English, having originated as a germanic language, uses premodifier noun adjuncts (is this the right terminology?) to form compound nouns like "science fiction writer". However, English also says "...
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3answers
244 views

“Potential,” “wanna-be”: what's an equivalent for “should-be”?

If "Ooze News could be a title for my website about slime molds," I can say: Ooze News is a potential title for my website about slime molds. If "Janet wants to be a pilot," I can say: Janet is ...
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3answers
641 views

Attributive nouns vs. of-genitive

I would be very grateful for some advice on how to decide whether to use an attributive noun or the "of genitive" (periphrastic genitive). It seems to me that an attributive noun is generally ...
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3answers
337 views

Can/Should an adjective and an attributive noun be used to modify the same noun?

I am writing a scientific thesis and wondering about the heading of one of the major parts. The part gives detailed information on experiments (experimental details) that were performed and ...
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5answers
859 views

Adjective for “wide” space?

I'm trying to translate something from Japanese. The original is talking about a store that is very "wide", i.e., its sideways dimensions are disproportionately long. You could think of it as a place ...
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2answers
812 views

In place names, do the words qualifying the place act as an adjective?

If you have a place name such as “The Sierra Nevada Mountains”, does Sierra Nevada act as an adjective? My guess is yes, since they qualify the noun mountains, e.g.: “Which mountains? The Sierra ...
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2answers
161 views

Is “banker friend” a noun adjunct, or something else?

Consider the sentence: I have a banker friend, and she says that interest rates are going up. Here a banker friend is being used to mean a friend who is a banker. Is there a name for this kind ...
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1answer
89 views

repetition of articles

Let's say you have three nouns separated by "or" or "and", and all three are always used together and have the same attibutive noun : Example: market force, market strategy and market segmentation ...
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1answer
14k views

Which one is grammatically correct: “wood door” or “wooden door”

I have a grammar which says that: "The 'noun+noun' structure is normally used to say what things are made of." "A few pairs of nouns and adjectives are used as modifiers with different meanings. ...
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1answer
2k views

Age description and hyphenating

How would I say a toddler is 2 years and 7 months old correctly? Is this right: It is a two-year-seven-month-old toddler. Or do I need an “and” between? I personally think hyphenating here looks ...
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1answer
2k views

Plural modifying noun [duplicate]

Where can I learn about the English rules for noun phrases in which a modifying noun is semantically plural? We say "Horse trainer," not "horses trainer", even though there is usually more than one ...
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11answers
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One’s love confession vs. One’s confession of love

The following is an extract taken from an Italian student's piece of English homework before I corrected it. Also Mr Amos’s girlfriend, Sabina, arrives to the restaurant, and she assisted to ...
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1answer
608 views

Using an apostrophe on wedding invitation [duplicate]

I am designing an RSVP, in which I give my guests the option of choosing their meal preference. I have a column for ticking the option of a kid's meal, then at the bottom I have a key for all of the ...
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2answers
6k views

Usage of double plural

Here we have the plural in the end: "communication technology services" Here we have two plurals(quite common in google): "communications technology services" Eventually, we could have three ...
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2answers
979 views

“of the” vs noun adjunct [duplicate]

Please note: This may be a complex question, references would be great, search engines do not help with "of the". Looks like we can remove the use of "of the" with a noun adjunct switching the order ...
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1answer
182 views

When is it correct to postpone an attributive clause?

Normally, the attributive clause precedes the predicative phrase: The bag that he bought cost forty dollars. Those verbal valency complementations that are referentially identical with some of ...
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1answer
127 views

Scope of a noun adjunct

I have the following sentences: The software is from an enterprise vendor. The software is from a vendor that serves enterprises. The software is from a vendor which serves enterprises. The ...
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1answer
116 views

“Craven, crass and mafioso tactics”--failure of parallelism?

Read on the internet: "Voters rejected the craven, crass and mafioso tactics of [name withheld because this is a question about grammar, not politics]." Sounds odd to me, because craven and crass are ...
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4answers
1k views

Decomposing “fingerprint”

I somehow ended up in a small argument about the first part of the compound word "fingerprint". The other person insists that the first word "finger" is an adjective, which I cannot agree with. "...
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1answer
808 views

Irregular plurals in noun adjuncts

Several psycholinguists1,2 have observed that English speakers do not use regular plurals in compounds, even when the noun refers to more than one instance (dog-catcher, *dogs-catcher), but do use ...
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4answers
2k views

Which form should be used for at­tribu­tive nouns like “stu­dent union”: sin­gu­lar or plu­ral, or pos­ses­sive sin­gu­lar or pos­ses­sive plu­ral?

When should a noun that’s used at­tribu­tively to de­scribe an­other noun be plu­ral, and when should it be sin­gu­lar? And when should it be pos­ses­sive, like bak­er’s dozen and when should it be ...
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6answers
2k views

Is it still an “ice cream cone” if it doesn't have ice cream?

I had a discussion with some friends yesterday about whether the term "ice cream cone" describes: Simply the cone itself or The cone plus the ice cream Upon looking in several online dictionaries, I ...