Questions tagged [attributive-nouns]

An attributive noun, also called a noun adjunct, refers to a noun placed before another noun to modify it, like "dog" in "dog catcher" and "dog food", "heart" in "heart surgery", "running" in "running shoes", "employee" in "employee compensation", and "Peter" in "Peter Principle". It is an alternative to a prepositional phrase, like "food for dogs" or "surgery of the heart". You can use a predicate test to distinguish a noun adjunct from an adjective.

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1answer
426 views

Which of “game names” and “games names” is correct? [duplicate]

What it's supposed to designate: A list of the name of each game. So there are multiple games and therefore multiple names. But should either or both take an s at the end in a list of game(s) name(...
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Grammatical number of Latin nouns used attributively before other nouns

I read a paper today that kept using "multistrata" to describe an object with multiple layers. For example: I love multistrata cakes. This sounds wrong to my ear, I think "multistratum" sounds ...
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3answers
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Should “two weeks vacation” be written “two weeks’ vacation” with a possessive apostrophe?

I’ve always understood that the phrase two weeks usually turns into two weeks’ when used as a modifier as in I’m giving my two weeks’ notice. I get two weeks’ vacation. (“two weeks’ holiday” for ...
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5answers
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A synonym for “total” with a negative connotation

I'm looking for a synonym for "total", as in sum of multiple of parts, but with a negative connotation. The context is that a man finds all his sins combined—his total—in tangible form. My first ...
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8answers
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A word used to describe someone who loves to be photographed [closed]

I am trying to figure out if there is a word to describe a person who loves to be photographed.
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Use of “s” in two consecutive words

I was doing my online banking and reading through their material, when I noticed a blurb " we offer you a wide range of savings account and fixed deposit products and services.....". Should this not ...
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3answers
701 views

What is the name of a person who likes high quality items?

What is the name of a person who likes high quality items, not necessarily the most expensive, but the best for the money perhaps.
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1answer
92 views

Is an adjective/noun adjunct carried by reference with the word “another”

I am looking for the best interpretation of the phrase: ... if one structured property contains another, only one of them can be repeated. Which is central to a StackOverflow question. In ...
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2answers
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Is “star wars” equivalent to “wars of the stars” ? Then how about “world war”? [duplicate]

I have some questions: Why "star wars" and not "stars wars"? Is "star wars" equivalent to "wars of the stars"? In French it would be "les guerres des etoiles", what about the English version? If ...
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4answers
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“Employee” in the phrase “employee ID” is a determiner, not an adjective—right?

I am a software developer with a bit of a linguistic slant. We were recently given some training on how to name database fields and were told to avoid adjectives in names. Then we were given an ...
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4answers
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Is this noun used as an adjective?

I read this recently in The Economist: At the end of the summit, the French and European officials had claimed a points victory over the Germans by getting them to agree more firmly to a target ...
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1answer
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“A of B” or “B A” Noun Adjunct vs. Prepositional Phrase

English, having originated as a germanic language, uses premodifier noun adjuncts (is this the right terminology?) to form compound nouns like "science fiction writer". However, English also says "...
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“of the” vs noun adjunct [duplicate]

Please note: This may be a complex question, references would be great, search engines do not help with "of the". Looks like we can remove the use of "of the" with a noun adjunct switching the order ...
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3answers
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“Potential,” “wanna-be”: what's an equivalent for “should-be”?

If "Ooze News could be a title for my website about slime molds," I can say: Ooze News is a potential title for my website about slime molds. If "Janet wants to be a pilot," I can say: Janet is ...
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806 views

“The England … team” vs “The English … team”

Why are country sports teams, for example, from England, referred to as 'The England football team' as opposed to 'The English football team'?
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“Craven, crass and mafioso tactics”--failure of parallelism?

Read on the internet: "Voters rejected the craven, crass and mafioso tactics of [name withheld because this is a question about grammar, not politics]." Sounds odd to me, because craven and crass are ...
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3answers
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Can/Should an adjective and an attributive noun be used to modify the same noun?

I am writing a scientific thesis and wondering about the heading of one of the major parts. The part gives detailed information on experiments (experimental details) that were performed and ...
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2answers
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In place names, do the words qualifying the place act as an adjective?

If you have a place name such as “The Sierra Nevada Mountains”, does Sierra Nevada act as an adjective? My guess is yes, since they qualify the noun mountains, e.g.: “Which mountains? The Sierra ...
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Is “banker friend” a noun adjunct, or something else?

Consider the sentence: I have a banker friend, and she says that interest rates are going up. Here a banker friend is being used to mean a friend who is a banker. Is there a name for this kind ...
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repetition of articles

Let's say you have three nouns separated by "or" or "and", and all three are always used together and have the same attibutive noun : Example: market force, market strategy and market segmentation ...
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1answer
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“A mice problem” vs. “a mouse problem”

My friend said to me one day: "We have a mice problem at UNI". Is "a mice problem" grammatical as opposed to "a mouse problem"?
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1answer
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Using an apostrophe on wedding invitation [duplicate]

I am designing an RSVP, in which I give my guests the option of choosing their meal preference. I have a column for ticking the option of a kid's meal, then at the bottom I have a key for all of the ...
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Noun adjuncts, possessive or using “of”

meta: This is my first time on your site. I have been teaching English for longer than I care to mention (native speaker). I am trying to find a way of explaining to some intermediate students why ...
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1answer
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Is a predicative adjunct part of a noun, or is it part of the sentence?

I just recently learned about predicative adjunct which is present in the following sentence by the "ready to race" adjectival phrase. I wonder whether the phrase that functions as a predicative ...
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Difference between “Education Institute” & “Institute of Education”?

Also, what is this property called? X Y versus Y of X.
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When is it correct to postpone an attributive clause?

Normally, the attributive clause precedes the predicative phrase: The bag that he bought cost forty dollars. Those verbal valency complementations that are referentially identical with some of ...
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Referring a particular website, should I use the noun adjunct or the genitive/possessive?

I'm wondering if there are any guidelines about using the noun adjunct or the possessive with a website and a company. Should I write: go to the Twitter website or go to Twitter's website? AFAIK ...
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Scope of a noun adjunct

I have the following sentences: The software is from an enterprise vendor. The software is from a vendor that serves enterprises. The software is from a vendor which serves enterprises. The ...
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Decomposing “fingerprint”

I somehow ended up in a small argument about the first part of the compound word "fingerprint". The other person insists that the first word "finger" is an adjective, which I cannot agree with. "...
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“BookList” or “booksList?” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicates: “User accounts” or “users account?” Is it correct to say “lesson count” or “lessons count”? I'm wondering whether or not I ...
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Is it still an “ice cream cone” if it doesn't have ice cream?

I had a discussion with some friends yesterday about whether the term "ice cream cone" describes: Simply the cone itself or The cone plus the ice cream Upon looking in several online dictionaries, I ...
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5answers
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Is 'lightning' here a noun or an adjective or even an adverb?

Oxford Dictionaries has this example under ADJECTIVE 'lightning': (1) Roman is lightning quick and improving every day in practice, and Bean showed playmaking ability in the preseason. The ...
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Are there any rules for genitive case not indicating possesion? [duplicate]

My teacher, a native English speaker, was quite puzzled when I asked this and could not answer this question. Why there is: child seat but children's love //why these are different ...
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3answers
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Is “A Midsummer’s Night’s Dream” correct English?

Shakespeare’s play is called A Midsummer Night’s Dream. So is A Midsummer’s Night’s Dream correct English? If not, what would be the correct English?
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976 views

Is it incorrect to refer to a set of things by using the singular form of the objects it contains? [duplicate]

I'm sorry I couldn't word that better, the following example will hopefully clarify: As you can see, the teacher refered to the bank of words as "word bank", as opposed to "words bank". Which one is ...
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plural nouns: should I add “s” ending to both nouns? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “User accounts” or “users account” “BookList” or “booksList?” Is it correct to say “lesson count” or “lessons count”? should a list of tokens be called a “token list” or a ...
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1answer
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Thing count or thingS count [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “User accounts” or “users account” Should a list of tokens be called a “token list” or a “tokens list” “BookList” or “booksList?” When there are ...
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2answers
793 views

“Countries List” or “Country List”? [duplicate]

Duplicate of: “User accounts” or “users account” “Employee list” or “employees list” Should a list of tokens be called a “token list” or a “tokens list” “BookList” or “booksList?” Is it ...
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1answer
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should a list of tokens be called a “token list” or a “tokens list” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “User accounts” or “users account?” I ask because a list of tasks would usually be called a "task list". However a list or previous winners of a ...
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0answers
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“feed aggregator” instead of “feeds aggregator” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is it correct to say “lesson count” or “lessons count”? I find it odd that the common expression (see Wikipedia for example) is "feed aggregator" ...
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0answers
215 views

Is it correct to say “lesson count” or “lessons count”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “user accounts” or “users account”? If I mean "number of lessons", which grammatical construction should I go for? I can imagine three of them: Lesson ...
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2answers
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Item queue vs items queue? Files list vs File list? [duplicate]

My question is connected with programming. I'm not sure how to name my class. Should it be ItemQueue or ItemsQueue? We are talking about queue, which stores many items. We can add new ones or remove ...
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4answers
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Nouns of plural form preceding another noun

I was reading Computers, Communications, and Information A User's Introduction (Seventh Edition) by Sarah E. Hutchinson and Stacey C. Sawyer. The authors consistently used such terms as ...
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1answer
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Young Surveyors Network or Young Surveyor Network? [duplicate]

I'm a surveyor and we are currently setting up our network. However, there seems to be a disagreement on the proper name of the group. The group is composed of young surveyors under the age of 35, ...
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Why are nouns sometimes pejorative when used attributively?

Certain nouns can often be used as noun adjuncts in place of a corresponding adjective, with no change in literal meaning, where: The noun is not pejorative when used nominatively by itself. Nor is ...
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Exam day or exam's day? [closed]

What one's correct? I will see you on the exam day I will see you on the exam's day Today is the exam day Today is the exam's day And why?
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Are “skill set” and “skill sets” both acceptable?

Are the phrases skill set and skill sets both correct? As I see it, set implies a single set of related skills whereas sets can be taken to mean multiple sets of skills around different ...
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3answers
940 views

Origin of plurality of “wars” in phrases like “Star Wars”

There are a number of compounds in English of the form "noun wars," e.g. "Star Wars," "mommy wars," "culture wars." Why do these show "wars" in the plural? It seems like normally "wars" would pertain ...
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3answers
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Does “the motor speed” mean the speed of the motor? [closed]

I'm an engineer and I often hear others say "the motor speed" when they are talking about the speed of the motor. For example, one might ask "What was the motor speed?" when he or she wants to know ...
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2answers
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A noun adjunct / the possessive case

Sometimes it’s possible to use either a noun adjunct or the possessive case. the shop door the shop’s door However, in certain phrases it’s not OK to do so. the ship’s crew (the ship crew is ...