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Questions tagged [attributive-nouns]

An attributive noun, also called a noun adjunct, refers to a noun placed before another noun to modify it, like "dog" in "dog catcher" and "dog food", "heart" in "heart surgery", "running" in "running shoes", "employee" in "employee compensation", and "Peter" in "Peter Principle". It is an alternative to a prepositional phrase, like "food for dogs" or "surgery of the heart". You can use a predicate test to distinguish a noun adjunct from an adjective.

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1answer
195 views

“Footsteps Sounds” or “Footstep Sounds”

I have a friend who wants to title his thesis "Footsteps Sounds". I don't think this sounds right but I can't explain why. To me it should be "Footstep Sounds". Are both correct with different ...
11
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4answers
2k views

There's a product described as “Omaha Steaks Burgers” is this proper English? [closed]

There is a commercial that has the description, Omaha Steaks Burgers, it drives me crazy. It sounds wrong, when I read it, it looks wrong. It seems improper to me. Old-fashioned burgers just ...
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4answers
329 views

Nouns as adjectives

Nouns can be used as adjectives modifying other nouns, like: The discussion was about supplier local content development. Can we rephrase the above to: The discussion was about local content ...
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3answers
942 views

What does “consequence-free chance” mean?

I read this sentence on TIME (Oct.23 2017), Having announced that he will retire at the end of 2018, Corker, once a key Trump ally, could emerge as a leading check on some of the President’s worst ...
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0answers
32 views

Can “Almond Milk” Be an Adjective? [duplicate]

When one orders an "almond milk latte," can "almond milk" be considered an adjective?
55
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1answer
336k views

Is there an apostrophe in a master's degree?

The question asks it all really. When referring to a master's degree, do you use an apostrophe or not? That is, is it "a master's" or "a masters"?
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1answer
51 views

Does the order of the atributes matter when describing an object? [duplicate]

Suppose the following The horse is big, white and heavy. Does the meaning of the noun change when the order of the atributes of an object change (in this case a horse)? Are there any exceptions? ...
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1answer
158 views

On the idiomaticity of attributive proper nouns, proper adjectives, and either singular or plural possessives when describing Imperial Possessions [closed]

When talking about something which is owed by an empire or is considered to be a part of that empire, which of the many ways to express this relationship are most commonly used and generally accepted ...
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2answers
142 views

Is the noun “device” correctly used as a modifier in the phrase “the device box”?

For example, "the instruction manual can be found in the device's box". "Device's" doesn't sound right to me, so I thought of using: "the instruction manual can be found in the device box". Is it ...
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1answer
3k views

“Attributive Noun” vs “ Compound Noun”

What's the difference between an "attributive and a compound noun"? Some English sites say it's all but thee same and some sites say they're different. Compound : In a compound noun all the words ...
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4answers
750 views

What is the word that denotes the words preceding these nouns?

What word describes/denotes the words that precede vision in the following two words: computer vision and machine vision?
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1answer
989 views

Should “children” or “children's” be used in “London's children('s) and family portrait photographer”? [closed]

"London's children and family portrait photographer" or "London's children's and family portrait photographer"? Any help gratefully appreciated
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1answer
188 views

Inconsistency regarding plural: why do we write “results file” but also “result list”?

How come it is ok to write "results file", while you must write "result list" rather than "results list"?
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1answer
79 views

Study vs Education as modifiers

Could you describe the difference in contexts/connotations for "Study" and "Education" as modifiers, particularly in "study programs" and "education programs" at the university - might be my question ...
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1answer
425 views

Should one use the term “adjective agreement” or “adjectival agreement”?

Is it better to use the term adjective agreement (noun noun) or adjectival agreement (adjective noun)? By contrast, when talking of subject-verb agreement, I'm not aware of an adjectival term like ...
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3answers
346 views

Noun Capitalization When Used With Common Nouns

I have come across a few written documents by my peers that have what I would call a proper noun grouped with a common noun. So as an example without any capitalization: Select the edit menu from ...
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1answer
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Why do we say a “hotel room” and not a “hotel's room”? [closed]

I would like to know what the rule is to explain why we do not use the genitive construction hotel's room. Instead, we say "a hotel room". Other examples: a hospital bed a bike stand Would it ...
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1answer
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Wafer — New Adjective or Attributive Noun?

In The Guardian today, Andrew Rawnsley writes that the Prime Minister would have a wafer and volatile majority. On the assumption that "wafer" here is not simply a misprint for "wafer-thin", what do ...
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1answer
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A verb used as an adjective used as a noun used as an adjective?

The Question: Is it acceptable to use a nominalized participle as an adjective? A participle is a verb form used as an adjective; examples include the running man and the caught ball, as well as (...
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1answer
2k views

Age description and hyphenating

How would I say a toddler is 2 years and 7 months old correctly? Is this right: It is a two-year-seven-month-old toddler. Or do I need an “and” between? I personally think hyphenating here looks ...
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1answer
482 views

Singular or plural after multiple noun adjuncts?

After a series of noun adjuncts (attributive nouns), do we use the singular or plural form of the common final noun? Example: The bank lends to companies in power, steel, and textile industry. The ...
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1answer
76 views

“state's secrets” vs. “state secrets” [closed]

Is it state's secrets or state secret? I am always confused when I try to put " 's " to things . I have read answers about use of the possessive apostrophe but I am not sure whether this should be: ...
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1answer
362 views

Noun adjunct vs. Possessive apostrophe [duplicate]

If I run a company for children, do I run a children's company a children company a childrens company I originally thought "children's company" was correct but the children are not in possession ...
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1answer
161 views

Value of time vs time value [duplicate]

I want a compensation equal to the value of my time. I was told by a native speaker that this is the correct expression (instead of saying equal to my time value), but I don't know why. Could ...
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1answer
127 views

Why is the phrase “coal country” uncountable in this sentence? Does it mean a particular region?

Why is the phrase "coal country" uncountable in this sentence? Does it mean a particular region? Were he frustrated in Congress, the president would surely fall back on areas where he has a free ...
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1answer
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What is the grammatically correct: “Languages Services” or “Language Services”? [duplicate]

Is "Languages Services" correct for when you offer multiple services for multiple languages? Or should it still be "Language Services"? Why? Thank you guys!
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0answers
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Should it be “clotted cream scones” or “clotted-cream scones”? [duplicate]

I'm eating clotted cream-covered scones. or I'm eating clotted-cream-covered scones. or I'm eating clotted cream covered scones. Formally, I thought they'd have to be clotted-cream scones, ...
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1answer
630 views

is it “mice infested” or “mouse infested”?

You would say "rat infested" but would you say "mouse infested" or "mice infested"? Sidenote: I think we would say "mouse infestation" so I'm assuming we would also say "louse infestation" as ...
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1answer
746 views

Should hyphens go between these examples?

I understand that we usually don't use hyphens when the meaning is clear (e.g- noise-cancelling headphones). I am just a bit confused when the hyphen is put between just two words instead of more ...
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1answer
2k views

Weekend Celebrations or Weekend's Celebrations [duplicate]

Imagine a wedding invitation which ends with the following sentence: To round off the weekend celebrations, please join us for lunch. Would it be more, less, or equally correct to say: To round ...
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2answers
211 views

Stop engaging in “eating disorder behaviors” or “eating disordered behaviors”? [closed]

Which sentence is more grammatically correct? We'd like you to refrain from engaging in eating disorder behaviors this week. We'd like you to refrain from engaging in eating disordered ...
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2answers
28k views

Can the word ‘genius’ be used as an adjective?

Can the word 'genius' be used as an adjective? For example: 'A genius plan' or 'This is a genius piece of work'?
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3answers
20k views

“Electric bill”, “electrical bill” or “electricity bill” [closed]

Which is correct: electric bill, electrical bill or electricity bill?
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1answer
843 views

singular/ plural in the attributive [duplicate]

A doll house or a dolls house? Which is correct for the toy? ... There's that thing called Same Sex Couples Act; how about calling it Same Sex Couple Act? The question is - when should I put ...
3
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1answer
2k views

Plural modifying noun [duplicate]

Where can I learn about the English rules for noun phrases in which a modifying noun is semantically plural? We say "Horse trainer," not "horses trainer", even though there is usually more than one ...
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1answer
15k views

Which one is grammatically correct: “wood door” or “wooden door”

I have a grammar which says that: "The 'noun+noun' structure is normally used to say what things are made of." "A few pairs of nouns and adjectives are used as modifiers with different meanings. ...
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11answers
3k views

One’s love confession vs. One’s confession of love

The following is an extract taken from an Italian student's piece of English homework before I corrected it. Also Mr Amos’s girlfriend, Sabina, arrives to the restaurant, and she assisted to ...
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3answers
2k views

Genitive case or attributive noun

Is there any rule for when it is better to use genitive case or noun as adjective? I'm not sure if there is any difference in meaning in this example: The department of accounting The ...
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1answer
960 views

what does “whiplash moment” mean?

I'm currently reading a New York Times article about the relationship change between the U.S. and Russia after the election of Mr. Trump. I came across the following: “We are in a whiplash moment ...
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1answer
85 views

“mammal exhibit” vs. “ mammals exhibit” vs. “mammals' exhibit” [duplicate]

Ok, I'm writing a story where the character visits a museum. Does she visit: the mammal exhibit the mammals exhibit the mammals' exhibit
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8answers
2k views

Why do we say “Japan earthquake” and not “Japanese earthquake”?

Isn’t earthquake a noun and the preceding word an adjective? Isn’t “Japanese” the adjectival form of “Japan”?
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6answers
4k views

We say “U.S. citizen”, but why can't we say “China citizen”? Or can we?

Is the word "U.S." an adjective or a noun modifier in this case? It seems to me that it is an adjective that goes before citizen, because we say "Russian citizen", "Chinese citizen", etc. But if it's ...
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1answer
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When can a noun be used attributively?

Nouns can modify nouns: cat food, coffee cup, gold ring, laser surgery, flood insurance. It seems to me there are even cases where a noun sounds better than the corresponding adjective: sociology ...
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1answer
458 views

“Automata theory” vs. “automaton theory”

The theory of groups is called group theory, not groups theory; the theory of functions is function theory, not functions theory; the theory of lattices is lattice theory, and so on. How come the ...
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3answers
2k views

Plural nouns in nominal compounds

I wonder whether there are rules or guidelines regarding plural nouns in nominal compounds. For example a compound university students list. If there are many lists and many universities is it ...
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7answers
3k views

Why is it “materials science” instead of “material science”?

Does anyone know how the "s" at the end of "materials" in "materials science" came about? It seems like "material science" would be equivalent, and is more natural to say aloud. For comparison with a ...
6
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1answer
830 views

Irregular plurals in noun adjuncts

Several psycholinguists1,2 have observed that English speakers do not use regular plurals in compounds, even when the noun refers to more than one instance (dog-catcher, *dogs-catcher), but do use ...
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1answer
62 views

“Window replacement company” or “Windows replacement company” [duplicate]

My client says: "We are a trusted windows and doors replacement company." It sounds funny. It seems like it should be singular: window and door. Although, if it is part of the name "Acme Windows ...
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1answer
404 views

Nouns vs. nouns used as adjectives [duplicate]

Given the following sentence: You should always use prefixes with your table names Is the word table properly labeled as a noun or an adjective, as it is functioning as an adjective but the base ...
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2answers
83 views

How do I choose between a noun and a participle when picking one to use as an adjective?

I know that I can use both a noun and a participle as an adjective but what do I have to ask myself when choosing between them? For instance: Talking points, talk points Information ...