Questions tagged [aspiration]

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Sibilance/aspiration in the letter D in "don't", "day" etc

I can't seem to find anything explaining this, but on words like "don't" and "day", some people pronounce the D with a sibilant sound/aspiration and others like a dead D with no ...
Pedro Henrique Quiste's user avatar
4 votes
3 answers
198 views

Do American pronounce "she looked at me" as /ʃiː lʊkt æt mi/ or /ʃiː lʊkd æt mi/?

Although some people say that flap-t [ɾ] is used if phonemic /t/ is between two vowels as in matter [ˈmædəɹ], I think that definition is incomplete because if phonemic /t/ occurs before a stressed ...
Tom's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
141 views

Unvoiced final "d" where it "should" be voiced -- regional accent question

Native speaker here. I don't have a problem with /d/, but somehow in words like "record", and in all -ed preterites, I voice it /t/, borderline aspirated. My English is native (think, dream ...
peisander's user avatar
  • 195
1 vote
3 answers
1k views

Are /t, p, k/ aspirated when they are at the start of a syllable after another syllable that ends in /s/?

In English (native speakers' speech), voiceless plosives such as /t/, /p/ and /k/ are produced with a strong burst of air when they are in the start of a syllable before a vowel. That is called "...
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1 vote
1 answer
426 views

Is the /p/ aspirated in /pr/ combination in the beginning of a stressed syllable?

In English the /p/ is generally aspirated (produced with a strong burst of air) when it comes in the start of a stressed syllable. For example, the /p/ in "pin" is aspirated (produced with a ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
70 views

The usage of article 'an' in the following case [duplicate]

It is common to use 1a an historical event 2a an hotel rather than 1b a historical event 2b a hotel Why 'an' is used in such case?
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4 votes
1 answer
304 views

Can a plosive consonant in a word be pronounced as an unreleased consonant?

ESL teachers always tell people to suppress the normal release of the consonant "p b k g t d" if it's at the end of a word and the next word also begins with a consonant. But what about words with a ...
Adrian GUO's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
276 views

Is the phoneme /k/ in the word cube aspiated or unaspirated?

I have a debate in class about the aspiration status of the phoneme /k/ in the word "cube". By the rule, it should be. However, some people's pronunciation with the sheet paper in front of the subject'...
Buddie's user avatar
  • 9
3 votes
2 answers
2k views

How does the unaspirated /t/ differ from /d/?

For example, how is 'stop' pronounced differently from 'sdop', in terms of tongue position and other aspects?
Kent Tong's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
2k views

Aspiration in American English

I would like know which consonants are aspirated in American English and when? Also, when are they not aspirated?
Luke's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
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is the first sound /k/ in the word "confused" aspirated or unaspirated?

I thought that it is aspirated because of the rule of aspiration : the stops like /p t k/ become aspirated when they occur in the word initial position OR in the onset position of the stressed ...
2016pass's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
2k views

Why does /t/ after a consonant (ex: /ˈnaɪn.ti/) produce less air than /t/ at the beginning of word (ex: /ˈtaɪlænd/) or after a vowel (ex: /ˈraɪ.tər/)?

My mother tongue is Vietnamese and I often have difficulty making the English /t/ sound. Here is what I discovered. If a /t/ is the beginning of word (e.g. /taɪ/ tie, /tɪn/ tin, /ˈtaɪ.lænd/ Thailand) ...
Tom's user avatar
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7 votes
1 answer
223 views

In English, can a whole syllable be aspirated?

Living in Merseyside, I've noticed a phonetic oddity that I can't find described anywhere [I did a Web search and found a transcript of Liverpool speech on a Liverpool University site, but no mention ...
David Garner's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
2k views

Aspiration in 'lecture'

Why in a word 'lecture' /k/ is unaspirated? Shouldn't it be weakly aspirated because of the fact that it's in unstressed syllable?
maja's user avatar
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23 votes
4 answers
11k views

Why are 'student' and 'suspend' not pronounced as written?

I am a Chinese student beginning to learn English. I am curious to know why the word student is pronounced with the sound of d instead of t. Likewise, why is the sound of b used instead of p when ...
Joey zhu's user avatar
  • 389
2 votes
1 answer
636 views

Why do the first and last "t" in "taste" sound different?

When I listened to the audio pronunciation of "taste" /teɪst/, I noticed that the first and last "t" sound different: the first "t" sounds like [tʰ] while the second one sounds more like [tsʰ]. Words ...
Hin's user avatar
  • 23
3 votes
2 answers
5k views

Pronunciation of final T sounds in English

What's the word to describe the phenomenon of the final 't' sound becoming a stop without aspiration, vs. how it sounds at the beginning of a word? Does any one particular dialect/accent of English ...
wrschneider's user avatar
20 votes
4 answers
1k views

Why do photons and protons exhibit such anomalous behavior?

I first noticed in this answer that there is something sneaky going on with the word photon: its ‹t› is the stressed allophone of /t/, a fully aspirated [tʰ]. It does not reduce to [t] or [ɾ] the way ...
tchrist's user avatar
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9 votes
3 answers
4k views

Why do we spell "eureka", not "heureka"?

Why is the spelling "eureka" by far more preferable to "heureka" in English? Greek vocabularies give "heureka" for the perfect to "heurisko".
Igor Urazowski's user avatar
-1 votes
2 answers
2k views

Usage of "an" before nouns beginning with an "h" where that "h" is not silent [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “A historic…” or “An historic…”? Such as an heinous crime an hideous monstrosity an hallucination This always looks wrong to me. I ...
jsj's user avatar
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-1 votes
3 answers
11k views

Aspirated letters vs. Silent letters

How are aspirated letters different from silent letters when pronouncing a word?
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