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13 votes
2 answers
678 views

In the phrase "the letter L" or "the number 3", which is the noun and which is the adjunct?

Question mostly says it all. In a phrase like "Project X", it seems clear that "Project" is the noun and "X" the adjunct, so the plural is "Projects X" and not &...
onigame's user avatar
  • 251
1 vote
1 answer
57 views

"She was a curious mixture, part grand lady, part wild child." — Is "part grand lady, part wild child" an appositive, supplement and adjunct?

oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com: (1) She was a curious mixture, part grand lady, part wild child. my parse: "Part grand lady" is a noun phrase. "Part wild child" is a noun phrase. &...
Loviii's user avatar
  • 742
4 votes
2 answers
79 views

"X not Y" structures [closed]

I frequently hear sentences like the following in spoken English, but rarely see this written. "The tree fell on my brother's car, not my father's car." "I ordered steak, not lobster.&...
WilsonT's user avatar
  • 43
5 votes
1 answer
211 views

Is it okay to start a non-essential appositive with this/that etc?

I know that sentences can start with a non-essential appositive, for example, A hot-tempered student, James refused to obey new school rules. I found lots of similar examples and every of them ...
celene 's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
55 views

Is the highlighted phrase an absolute phrase modifying the main clause or simply an non restrictive appositive?

But no one in Brega had a clear idea of what was happening on the battlefield, not even the few fighters fidgeting by a new barricade outside the refinery’s front gate Source-: https://www.newyorker....
rahul sehrawat's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
117 views

Is the noun modifier "among them a portable anti-tank rocket and a wheel-mounted recoilless rifle" an appositive or absolute phrase?

Higgins was looking at videos coming out of the Daraya region when he noticed several weapons that he had not yet documented in Syria, among them a portable anti-tank rocket and a wheel-mounted ...
rahul sehrawat's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
364 views

Do Temporal Adjuncts Function as External Adjuncts in a Noun Phrase, or Is This Another Grammatical Construct?

In certain pieces often written by journalists and others in the publishing profession, I have come across phrases like the one below (my own example): Tinker Hatfield, today a legend of the Nike ...
MJ Ada's user avatar
  • 391
4 votes
1 answer
116 views

What does it mean 'to reference' and what are the requirements of 'coreferentiality' in the context of descriptive grammar?

I would like to understand exactly what is meant in a grammar discussion when someone uses the word "coreferential". I understand it to mean that two or more constituents (e.g. a noun and ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 2,999
0 votes
3 answers
240 views

How do I identify and punctuate appositives?

An appositive is a noun that immediately follows another noun in order to clarify it. An appositive usually follows the noun it explains or identifies, but it may also precede it. Restrictive ...
UnbakedDecimeter's user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
220 views

When to use one or two commas with appositives?

I can't seem to find the answer to the above question. I know when to use no commas (essential) and when to use two commas (non-essential), but when do you use only one comma? It appears you use only ...
QuietInMontana's user avatar
3 votes
3 answers
71 views

An introductory appositive phrase or not?

while studying for the SAT, I came across some sentences which confuse me. 1. One of Bohr's peers, Austrian-Irish physicist Erwin Schrodinger, suggested that expecting quantum behavior in the broader ...
Kyle S's user avatar
  • 137
6 votes
6 answers
575 views

An introductory appositive phrase?

I came across this question while studying for the SAT. George Washington was born on February 22, 1732, in the Virginia colony, which was still under the control of Great Britain at the time. ...
Kyle S's user avatar
  • 137
1 vote
1 answer
101 views

What do we call the target of an appositive?

From Wikipedia (emphasis mine): Apposition is a grammatical construction in which two elements, normally noun phrases, are placed side by side so one element identifies the other in a different way. ...
Andrew Parsons's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
101 views

Object names as object's attributive nouns

Do names (e.g., proper nouns), when used as attributes for their referred objects, have the same stylistic constraints of use as other cases of attributive nouns? Specifically, the examples 5-8 are ...
l.inc's user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
0 answers
33 views

How should I offset an appositive that is neither a clause nor a noun phrase?

I'm trying to work out how to offset a tricky appositive. Here's the context: In Chapter 3, we consider how restrictions on x affect the properties of y. ... In Chapter 4, we consider the reverse ...
Tom Sharpe's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
25 views

"a statement, a noun related to the statement" is a weird case of apposition?

Joanna does a lot of charity work, a discussion she’s had plenty of times with a client. The clause after the comma looks like it could be an apposition but an apposition should follow a noun phrase ...
pabouk - Ukraine stay strong's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
237 views

Why is a relative clause not always an appositive?

A relative clause adds information: I, who am red, am here. Non-restrictive appositions have phrases injected into a sentence: I, red giant, am here. The injections add no essential information. Then ...
Christelle Augustin's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
106 views

Is it okay to start a sentence with an appositive?

I know you can use them in the middle of a sentence, but is it okay to start sentences with them? Example: A kind of a duck, the Mallard, can be found all throughout the world.
user456427's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
64 views

Is the highlighted part a noun phrase acting as an appositive or an absolute phrase, modifying the previous clause?

His chest and arms were thick and roped with muscle, testament to the athlete he’d once been. In the sentence above, is "testament to ..." modifying the previous clause "his chest ..&...
rahul sehrawat's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
111 views

Confusing reduction transformation

Let's assume sentence below (which is From "The Official Cambridge Guide to IELTS"). Ants simply sense changes in their environment, as for example when the mound's wall has been damaged, ...
Mahdi's user avatar
  • 35
1 vote
0 answers
49 views

Differentiate apposition from list [closed]

In the following sentence, I can only distinguish by knowing whether this is an apposition, i.e. the basic principles of material supply are kitting and line stocking, or whether the whole thing is a ...
Sebastian E's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
56 views

Apposition between the noun and the participial phrase

There’s “a glass broken by me.” But I want to use an apposition between “glass” and “broken” as in sentence one. A glass, my favorite one, broken by me is on the floor. A glass broken by me, my ...
user090607's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
58 views

How Many Ways May Apposition Occur in English?

Nearly invariably, appositives are presented as involving a noun phrase or noun clause modifying or supplementing a noun phrase. Usually, the discussion strongly implies that appositives occur only ...
Matthew Rips's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
37 views

Can a single comma close off two asides?

Example: The text's references to Joyce, as well as to Hemingway, who would often fight other pub-goers on behalf of the Irishman, made no mistake about this. It seems fine to me, but I just remember ...
user437018's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
126 views

Can appositives rename a verb?

While researching, I discovered the existence of 'summative' and 'resumptive' modifiers, which are both types of appositive. For context, here is an example of a summative modifier: He saw the ...
MJ Ada's user avatar
  • 391
2 votes
1 answer
96 views

Should I use definite or indefinite articles in appositive phrases listing someone’s accomplishments?

Not sure which is correct: I interviewed Bob, a writer for Time Magazine, the winner of two Pulitzer Prizes, and the author of three books. or I interviewed Bob, a writer for Time Magazine, a ...
DyingToKnow's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
75 views

The difference between Clausal Apposition and Content Clauses

In Cambridge Grammar of English: A Comprehensive Guide (Ronald Carter, Michael McCarthy - p. 576) they provide this example for showing the possibility of using a finite clause as apposition to a noun ...
bob's user avatar
  • 127
1 vote
2 answers
79 views

Determining the anchor (reference) of a nonrestrictive apposition [closed]

The following piece is from Critical Reading Workbook for the SAT 12th Edition (page 23): The word tephra, from the Greek word meaning ash, has come into use among geologists to describe the ...
bob's user avatar
  • 127
1 vote
0 answers
42 views

The Miss(es) Joneses

Fowler reads The Misses Jones is the old-fashioned plural, occasionally used when formality is required, e.g. in printed lists of guests present, etc.; otherwise the type the Miss Joneses is now ...
GJC's user avatar
  • 2,509
1 vote
2 answers
213 views

Enumeration with "all"

Consider this sentence: Your self-confidence, resilience and adaptability , all will help you integrate in this new competitive environment. My question is about the comma before all. I tried to ...
fev's user avatar
  • 34.5k
0 votes
0 answers
28 views

Comma use: Two variables, A and B, were examined in separate models [duplicate]

Grammarly recommends removing the second comma but for me it seems that this is needed. What would be the correct comma use in such a sentence? Two variables, fracture type and management method, ...
qw45ty's user avatar
  • 65
0 votes
0 answers
148 views

Should I put an appositive comma around a possessive appositive

In the process of editing a translation, I came across this sentence: "[That night] was also the opening curtain to the Sheng Yuan Emperor, Li Yi’s unification of the world." (To clarify ...
Mimishijie's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
36 views

do appositives only modify nouns or pronouns

Can an appositive modify an adverb? For example: I want to swim there, Pacific Beach. In the above example, 'Pacific Beach' is describing 'there.'Is this possible or do I need to insert a preposition, ...
Indira Singh's user avatar
1 vote
3 answers
85 views

Noun phrases with prepositions and appositions

In this sentence : Later on, experience the otherworldly feel of one of the “Most Beautiful Villages in France”, Riquewihr. Is there a relation between the 2 noun phrases the “Most Beautiful ...
Stephane's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
76 views

"the Wonder Wheel, a Ferris wheel that looked " VS "the Wonder Wheel, a Ferris wheel, that looked"

Above all, we boarded the Wonder Wheel, a Ferris wheel that looked as tall as a seven-story building. (From an ACT test) I know "a Ferris wheel that looked as tall as a seven-story building"...
HypnoticBuggyWraithVirileBevy's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
226 views

Gerund appositives

Can you show me sentences that use gerund clauses(not participial constructions) as a appositive clause as many as possible... Like “my favorite sport, playing baseball, has brought me friends.” (I ...
Kmd's user avatar
  • 19
0 votes
1 answer
170 views

Why is there no article before "key" in "key amongst them being ..."?

Why is there no article before key in the sentence? There are however pressing challenges for both systems, key amongst them being the need for better IT skills on the part of students and teachers. ...
Jenny's user avatar
  • 160
0 votes
0 answers
76 views

apposition clause and use of that

In the sentence below: "The other theory underlying Wright's design is that of organic architecture: that structure should appear to be an extension of their surroundings. " Question: I know ...
HypnoticBuggyWraithVirileBevy's user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
1k views

Should there be a semicolon after the third name and title?

Should there be a semicolon after the third name and title in this sentence (names and titles are not real), or is a single comma sufficient? Join John Smith, President and CEO, X Corporation; Mark ...
debbiesym's user avatar
  • 1,054
1 vote
2 answers
58 views

Use of which in a sentence

In the following sentences, is it necessary to use which? SRH, a recombination model, is used for direct bandgap materials. SRH, which is a recombination model, is used for direct bandgap ...
Bharath Reddy's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
37 views

Article with an appositive phrase

Please help me understand whether I need an article and why. *"Companies I have worked with: Wolfestone, translation agency (Swansea, UK) [...]"* Do I have to place an article before "...
Volodymyr's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
204 views

List of people including non-restrictive appositive

I'm editing a book with this sentence: 'Viroj, his wife, Pranom, Joan and I were duly ushered into an audience room at Chitralada Palace.' Viroj's wife is Pranom so Pranom is set off with commas as a ...
Daniel James Smith's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
1k views

"Systems those were" or "systems that were"?

Please, someone, help me to understand why is this first sentence incorrect? Incorrect: And it has affected the most to the systems those were already fragile. Correct: And it has affected the most ...
kaushal's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
124 views

Can you say two nouns are in apposition if the second one only refers to part of the first?

My daughter is teaching students at an Academy in the UK, i.e. at High School level, but is setting ambitious targets for grammar and writing. One topic she is developing materials for is Nouns in ...
Tom Sharpe's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
229 views

Use of punctuation in complex list with two sets of appositives

How would you punctuate the sentence below? Is it okay the way it is? I've never seen a sentence that introduced more than one list with a colon. I considered just taking out the colons. I also ...
A. Stewart's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
1k views

Appositive or Complement?

The way (that) he eats amuses me. I found the way (that) leads out of here. I love ice-cream in the same way (that) I love my mom. 1) The part of speech of the word that is conjunction in ...
Joe's user avatar
  • 31
1 vote
5 answers
636 views

What does the concept of "apposition" mean precisely?

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language makes a clear distinction between ascriptive and specifying supplements, and categorizes only the former as apposition. I believe that answers to similar ...
user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
128 views

Is this appositive adjective a misplaced modifier? E.g. He lived on the edge of a mountain, ancient and forgotten

I do not think "ancient and forgotten" would be associated with the subject "he", but I still want to be sure. I'm learning about appositive adjectives, and I saw this on a website: The castle, ...
WinDixie's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
180 views

Inversion verb-subject after an appositive phrase

I can't find a written rule about the subject-verb inversion in appositive phrases. In the temple, is a statue. In the temple, a statue is. I feel that the first one is more natural, but, as said, ...
Quidam's user avatar
  • 473
0 votes
1 answer
37 views

Is the middle section of this sentence an appositive?

"An arrest occurs when a person has been taken into custody, or kept under the control of police, and is not free to leave." Wanted to see if the middle sentence "or kept under the control of police"...
Craig West's user avatar