Questions tagged [american-english]

This tag is for questions related to the English language as used in the United States of America.

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1answer
32 views

Should I say "a LSM-tree" or "an LSM-tree"? [duplicate]

The "LSM-tree" is an acronym term for "Log-Structured Merge Tree". I wrote "a LSM-tree", but Grammarly keeps reminding me it should be "an LSM-tree". What is ...
15
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10answers
6k views

If I cannot win, then I will make it impossible for you to win

We have a joke about a foreigner that went to a wet market in zone 1 and saw a farmer selling live frogs in an open basket. As we all know, frogs jump. Actually, they jump about quite a bit when in a ...
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1answer
250 views

Why does Tucker Carlson (an American) say "A man called" rather than "A man named"? [closed]

Tucker Carlson is an American FOX news anchor. He's from San Francisco CA originally. However he constantly uses the non-American (British) expression A man called... rather than A man named... What ...
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1answer
63 views

Is it correct to say "why you pick us" in a sentence? [closed]

As titled, Actually, we always use this sentence in a way like: this is the reason why you pick us rather than in a question sentence, but what I am wondering is whether it's correct to use a ...
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0answers
46 views

Why do southern evangelical Christians in American churches say "how that" instead of how?

Why do evangelical Christians in American churches say "how that" instead of how? Ex. 1: Let me tell you a story about Billy Beaumont and how that, for our sakes, he joined the war to fight ...
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0answers
21 views

"realise that I didn't do something"

I don't why I am asking this, but is this sentence grammatically correct? "I realised that I didn't carry my book with me". Just wondering about the "that I didn't" phrase after &...
0
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1answer
45 views

What is grammatically correct and why

While complimenting someone, what is correct to say - You have an amazing taste, or You have amazing taste. I checked on online grammar checking websites, they consider both sentences as correct. I ...
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0answers
35 views

Design a question (addressing the chronological order involved) which is answered by say 'Abraham Lincoln was the 16th president of the United States' [duplicate]

In my native language of Malayalam, we have a word 'എത്രാമത്തെ' which denotes the chronological number/position of something. It crudely translates to 'How much'th'. As far as I know there is no ...
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2answers
186 views

Why doesn't the T of "lunatic" flap in American English?

I have never heard the T of "lunatic" become flap in American English. You can also listen to the data from Youglish. Compare "janitor" /ˈdʒænəɾɚ/ (Cambridge Dictionary gives /...
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0answers
99 views

What type of accent does this person have?

My friend has lived in Kenya for the first 8 years of his life and the United States for 2 & 1/2 years. He's been in Ireland since 2009. He is auditioning for a voiceover job on the radio and they ...
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0answers
23 views

How did you find it? vs What did you make of it? vs How did it [you] go?

What is the difference between those follow up questions? For example, if my friend said "I tried making octopus dumplings for the first time last night", can I add response follow up ...
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1answer
34 views

Does "for the record" come from legislatures' us(ag)e of the term? [closed]

So, what you'll hear sometimes is people saying, "for the record" before they say what they're going to say. Now, I know that in Congress and other similar institutions around the world (...
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3answers
69 views

Is "green ones" not slang for money? [closed]

I wish I could bring in some green ones. I cannot bring in the green ones. I'm making tons of the green ones. Are these proper English/American English sentences? Can you use "green ones" ...
2
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1answer
72 views

New Year's what?

I have often noticed that Americans say "New Years" - and wondered why it was plural. But just reading Obama's biography I've noticed for the first time it is spelled with an apostrophe. ...
2
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1answer
213 views

Does English allow alveolar flap [ɾ] at the ends of syllables? If yes, how to syllabify?

Prompted by this question: How to syllabify “very” or “merry” etc in British English?, I found the linked question interesting and it was a very good question but it did not get much attention, ...
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1answer
49 views

How to choose between "Subjunctive Mood" and "If - Adverbial clause of condition"?

I have below two sentences; how should I choose from these two in a conversation? It seems to me that when we talk about the person (him), since he is not here at the time of the conversation, and ...
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0answers
35 views

How to start an official letter to a company (not an individual)?

When you send a letter to a person in a company, you start with dear ..., But how do i start the letter when I'm writing to a company itself, not an individual in there? I don't even know which ...
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3answers
234 views

Where does 'po-faced' come from etymologically, geographically, and chronologically?

The entry for po-faced in Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2003) reads as follows: po-faced adj {perh. fr. po chamber pot, toilet, fr. F pot pot} (1934) Brit : having an assumed ...
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1answer
59 views

Is there a word for centering the English language that is disconnected from England?

I am looking to describe the centering of the English language (in a US-based but global business culture). The company itself is based in California, and what I'm seeing is an intersection of US-...
2
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2answers
363 views

Is "each's" a word? [closed]

I've looked, and while there does not seem to be any truly legitimate sources out there on the web that support "each's" being proper grammar. Opposing that, Google Docs does not put a wavy ...
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1answer
41 views

Is this a bet or a dare? [closed]

If i tell a friend to climb a car an he get’s 2 euro if he does this. Is this than a bet or a dare?
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1answer
280 views

Is "awe" pronounced as /ɔː/ or /ɑː/ in American English?

I have an American friend who pronounced the word "awe" with the same vowel as British people pronounce Thought: /ɔː/. But when I look up this word in dictionaries, they pronounce it as /ɑː/....
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2answers
92 views

American English: Must I always use a singular pronoun with a collective noun?

Here's the stretch of text that I'm struggling with: The [company] team and the [client] team will formally introduce themselves and explain their roles to one another. The [company] team will share ...
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0answers
15 views

Balancedness - is this a valid word in American English? [duplicate]

I am writing a scientific manuscript, where I wrote the following sentence: The balancedness of a chemical reaction implies that the stoichiometric coefficients satisfy the law of mass conservation. ...
6
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11answers
2k views

What is the American version of the word ''tearaway''? (a young person who behaves in an uncontrolled way and is often causing trouble) [duplicate]

I was looking for a word (a noun) that describes a young person/a teenager who is stubborn, acts recklessly, and likes to show off to draw people's attention (as they think it's cool). I've found the ...
2
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2answers
54 views

"at me" vs "at mine"

I'm watching (an American) TV Show where one of the characters says: "[..] treacherous, despicable serpent. Hurling wicked insults at mine every turn". I instantly noticed how they used an ...
2
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1answer
84 views

What is a British English equivalent to 'Fussbudget'?

Lucy from Charles Schultz's Peanuts strip is often described as a 'fussbudget', for example here: 'Lucy: Fussbudget to Feminist'. What is a British English equivalent to 'fussbudget'?
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1answer
35 views

What is the correct term for the style of writing used on resumes that does not have a subject?

On resumes, I frequently see a style of writing like the following: Acme Corp -- Contraption Designer Designed systems for catching road runners. Coordinated with clients for delivery in remote ...
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3answers
100 views

What does "prolonged mental inventory" mean? [closed]

This passage is adapted from Saki, "The Schartz-Metterklume Method", originally published in 1911. She wired a vague non-committal message to her destination to say that she was coming on &...
1
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1answer
34 views

What is Skinn & Sheer in the Ambrose Bierce fable: The Rainmaker?

In the tale of Ambrose Bierce - The Rainmaker it is said the following: hat is a pretty good joke," said the Reporter, laughing as well as he could in the strangling rain - "a mule driver's ...
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2answers
85 views

American reading of the British expression "look around impressively"

In British English, "he looked around the room impressively" is a somewhat common expression (warning: I grew up in the colonies and lived in the UK for only about 5 years, so please correct ...
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1answer
50 views

Are these two sentences "sentence fragments"?

This all changes with the arrival of Genos, a 19-year-old cyborg, who wishes to be Saitama's disciple after seeing what he is capable of. And thus begins the story of One Punch Man, an action-comedy ...
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0answers
66 views

American English: "Should have came ..."

So I'm watching Palmer, and Coles, a white, middle-class US American male, just said I shoulda came and visited you (refering to Palmer, who got out of prison earlier that week). The movie plays in ...
1
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1answer
74 views

What does the word 'operator' mean in here?

What does the word 'operators' mean in here? Does it actually mean technical operator or is it an idiom of some sort? I noticed a connection between the barn-burning section of The Moon and ...
-2
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1answer
57 views

What does the woman say in the movie? [closed]

What does the woman say in the movie? The link to the specified section of the movie: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1XHAEckAKxeEGyF2hQ8juhA5ewshXEhCo/view?usp=sharing
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2answers
42 views

What is the most common abbr. for “passengers” in American English?

I need to fit a long sentence in a small space and cannot change the font or size. It will be used for an UI of a ticketing machine in buses to announce how many passengers the ticket is for.
4
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1answer
79 views

Was "blue death" a popular term for Cholera in the US in the1800s?

I'm working on my dissertation on public health. I just came across Robert Morris' book on Cholera called, "The Blue Death". My university library doesn't have access to the book and both ...
0
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1answer
50 views

A word or short phrase instead of "the time taken between xxx and xx is..."

In looking for a word or short phrase to replace "the time taken in between milestone A and milestone B". For example a project plan has 4 milestones: Milestone 1: project initiative ...
0
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1answer
50 views

Correct form for Past Progressive(?) of Arrive using Have

I am a software engineer writing comments about the behavior of a certain section of code. While doing this, I found myself wanting to express an idea that I couldn't figure out how word in a ...
1
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1answer
39 views

Percentage comparison to/by/of/in

I am trying to see if there is a general rule for for percentage comparisons when it comes to additive or multiplicative results. For example, lets say I have 100 apples. I could say: My apples have ...
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0answers
28 views

What are historical reasons why the US people put initial in between their first and last names? [closed]

As far as I know it is not mandatory form of the full name, but many Americans (I reckon it is true for other English speaking nations, but it is much more typical for people in the US) choose to ...
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2answers
90 views

What's the difference between synergy and synergism? [closed]

Do synergy and synergism mean the same thing? Is there some sort of subtle difference in connotation? I'm asking in the context of American English, if it makes a difference. Edit: the context is ...
1
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2answers
61 views

What are some antonyms for salvation? [closed]

I'm writing an essay on how immigrants came to the US in the 1900s for salvation, but instead, they got the opposite. However, I'm looking for a more complex word; it'll sound boring if I just say it ...
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0answers
23 views

Comparing/Contrasting Adjectives with/without "the" and "one"

In terms of American English, I'm considering the following 3 options of comparing/contrasting adjectives. Are all of these okay? The red dress is better than blue. The red dress is better than the ...
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1answer
55 views

What does "done wore out one" refer to in casual Southern US American?

In the highly racist and despicable, although humorous, song "Alabama n-word", apparently from the 1960s in the Southern USA, at 1:30 into the song, the lyrics go like this: I'm glad this ...
1
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3answers
74 views

Is "considering stealing" grammatically correct? [duplicate]

I am working with a student who sends me essays and I help edit them. In one of his paragraphs, he wrote "The lecturer indicates this is illegal since it is considering stealing." In my head,...
0
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1answer
70 views

Do you say needn't have in AmE?

My textbook says that you can use this construction "needn't have" if you want to say that something that you have done in the past wasn't necessary and you didn't know it was unnecessary, ...
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0answers
23 views

What are the differences between "could" and "can" when stating a possibility?

For demanding payments there are two ways to say : You could transfer to this account You can transfer to this account Both make a grammatical sentence. Are there subtle differences between them I ...

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