Questions tagged [affixes]

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5
votes
3answers
939 views

“passf***ingport” is it a bad use of interjection?

I was just having a little conversation with a few friends, and I used the word ‘passfuckingport’ out of nowhere. I am not sure what it sparked - my Western friends where alright with it, but one of ...
1
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2answers
92 views

If we divide 'withdrawal' into prefix, root, and suffix; how will it be?

Like when we say un-happi-ness (prefix, root, and suffix), how can we divide withdrawal?
2
votes
1answer
87 views

Which suffix is in the word “precede”: -ede or -cede?

Which suffix is in the word "precede": -ede or -cede? I don't have an idea whether -ede or -cede is suffix in the words like precede, intercede, etc.
0
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1answer
35 views

What do you call a word with affixes? [closed]

Is it an affixed word? Affixated word? Affixation results in a ______?
1
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1answer
80 views

What is the opposite of a loanword? [closed]

The words in a language that weren't borrowed.
0
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2answers
3k views

Words ending in -ht, words ending in -th [duplicate]

Look at the endings of the following words: blight, bought, breadth, brought, caught, delight, depth, fifth, fought, fourth, fright, freight, height, light, plight, taught, thought, width, ... As ...
2
votes
4answers
3k views

If mono means 'one' and poly means 'many' what would be a prefix for none?

If I wanted a word that indicated the absence of a property, like how 'inorganic' means 'not containing carbon,' what prefix might I use to indicate that?
1
vote
1answer
142 views

Lexis: How to derive new words by applying affixes to old ones? [closed]

At university I learned the process and some of the details of how to derive new words from old ones using prefixes and suffixes, and how this process makes words change their part of speech, but I ...
1
vote
1answer
67 views

A possessive affix for words ending in 've'?

I was playing with my spell-checker, and decided to download up-to-date English (British) dictionaries from there. One of the files that is essential for spell-checkers, in addition to the .dic files ...
-1
votes
1answer
64 views

In 'undercut', how does 'under' affect 'cut'?

undercut (v.) [1.] late 14c., "to cut down or off," from under + cut (v.). [2.] In the commercial sense of "sell at lower prices" (or work at lower wages) it is first attested 1884. [3.] ...
0
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1answer
3k views

The meaning of the word “hemophilia” [closed]

In medical terminology, words are often combined of Greek and Latin roots and affixes. And we can recognize the meaning of a word by knowing the meaning of the prefix, the root and the suffix. The ...
-1
votes
1answer
798 views

On the etymology of some words using the prefix “trans” [closed]

According to the Wiktionary, the prefix "trans" is to be understood as Across, through, over, beyond, to or on the other side of, outside of. However, most of the words I can think of using this ...
1
vote
0answers
696 views

In word construction, is there an affix order?

Does English have classes of prefixes and suffixes like it does adjectives, and if so, how are they usually ordered? For example, adjectives usually go in this order (or something like it): Quantity ...
0
votes
1answer
58 views

Lexo-philosophical possibilities of the 'in'finite

Can anybody think of a word meaning infinite that isn't a combination of a negative prefix or suffix and a word meaning some sort of bound, such as limitless, endless, or unlimited? I haven't been ...
0
votes
2answers
350 views

Is Cess a Prefix or a Suffix?

My question concerns the following line on wikipedia page the word about Cess. In colonial India it was applied, with a qualifying prefix, to any taxation, such as irrigation-cess, educational-...
2
votes
2answers
484 views

Why does 'continual' involve interruption, and 'continuous' none ?

Source: Continuous indicates duration without interruption. ... Continual indicates duration that continues over a long period of time, but with intervals of interruption. ... The ...
9
votes
1answer
657 views

Expectaltee: A person who expects something

The word of the day: † expectaltee, n. Obs. rare. A person who expects something. [OED] You might ask how on the earth expectaltee is a word. Well, apparently it is a word but the origin is ...
4
votes
1answer
460 views

What is the need of an invisible affix?

When nothing means something: In morpheme-based morphology, a null morpheme is a morpheme that is realized by a phonologically null affix (an empty string of phonological segments). In simpler ...
0
votes
3answers
417 views

Is it right or wrong to use forms of words that aren't in any dictionaries? [closed]

I want to use the word ataractically in a formal piece of writing. A derived form of ataraxia, I'd like to use it in a sentence like this: This is the most ataractically candid thing I've ever ...
6
votes
4answers
8k views

What is the difference between a “prefix” and a “combining form”?

According to ODO, mini- is classified as a combining form. How exactly is this different from a prefix (or an affix, in general)? Can combining forms also be prefixes?
5
votes
3answers
1k views

Terminology for a word containing a prefix/suffix or neither

Does terminology exist for discriminating between words which do/don't contain a prefix/suffix? How could I describe this difference in the synonyms 'discontinue' and 'stop'? Here, 'dis' is a prefix ...
2
votes
2answers
354 views

Are there English affixes for left/right?

Is there an affix that means left (right)? E.g. Imagine it was the prefix lef-. We'd be able to generate the following words. lefcars (cars in which the steering wheel is on the left-hand side) ...
-1
votes
2answers
4k views

Is “unmissable” a valid word?

I noticed an advert on TV advertising "unmissable" shows coming up. MS Word marks it as a spelling mistake, but the Mac OS is OK with it. I don't particularly like it.
10
votes
2answers
1k views

Is “-th” still a productive suffix in English?

The main question here is whether using -(e)th to create ordinals out of cardinals1 is still considered a productive suffix in English. Is it? If so, then does it matter whether we are in a formal ...
1
vote
6answers
420 views

Synonyms for “extra-”

I'm looking for prefixes similar to extra- in the sense of 'outside of'. I'm attaching it to "mathematical" and in its context "extra-mathematical" or "extramathematical" can be misread as "very ...
1
vote
4answers
6k views

What is the adverbial form of “communicational”?

I tried communicationally, but the Free Dictionary doesn’t find it to be a word. What I am trying to express is that someone is communicationally challenged, basically meaning they can’t communicate ...
1
vote
0answers
138 views

“-ic versus -ical” what's the difference in meaning between adjectives ending in -ic or -ical? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why is it “geometric” but “theoretical”? “Ironic” vs. “ironical” “Comic” vs. “comical” “Historic” vs. “historical” What's the difference for instance between ironic/...