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Questions tagged [adverbs]

An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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Why is "second" an adverb in "came a close second"?

Consider the following example sentence excerpted from Oxford Learner's Dictionaries: One of the smaller parties came a close second (= nearly won). Much to my surprise, the example sentence is ...
xmllmx's user avatar
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History of "fast" as an adverb [closed]

When did the word "fast" become acceptable as an adverb? For example, We could say that we are driving fast, or we could say we are driving quickly. Have both always been acceptable english?
user504974's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
9 views

Using straight as an adverb [migrated]

I'm doing a worksheet where I have to identify adverbs. The sentence is "If you're running for three days straight you can't just eat energy snacks." The correct answer is "straight&...
Rosie's user avatar
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4 votes
2 answers
102 views

Adverb modifying two other adverbs

In the phrase "can express herself very fluently and precisely," does "very" modify both "fluently" AND "precisely"? Or just "fluently"? Or is it ...
LMR's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
59 views

How to identify adverbs or adjectives correctly in a sentence? [closed]

Everything is explained in the above sentence. Everything is explained in the sentence above. i)which part of speech is "above" in the first sentence? ii)which part of speech is "above&...
Md Anik's user avatar
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7 votes
1 answer
432 views

Adverbs in the mid-position when there is more than one verb

I am doing a worksheet about adverbs. For adverbs of certainty like 'probably' and 'definitely', it says that they go in the mid-position and it gives this rule: "mid: before main verb; if the ...
Rosie's user avatar
  • 79
0 votes
2 answers
133 views

Look forward very much to

One example of Cambridge grammar confuses me. I look forward very much to hearing from you soon. Is the sentence correct? Why does it put "very much" together with verb phrase "look ...
Kebab King's user avatar
0 votes
4 answers
82 views

How to use the word alive as an adjective in a sentence? [closed]

Example: She returned from spiritual retreat "vividly" (OR FULL OF LIFE) Is alive a postpositive adjective? If I want to say: She returned from spiritual retreat "ALIVELY" (...
Castro G's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
141 views

How do I know when to use: “completely”, “in full”, “totally” or “entirely”?

Does anyone know any rule or pseudo-rule that works to find out when each of the following terms should be used? Using: completely vs in full vs totally vs entirely I assume they are not completely ...
goahead97's user avatar
  • 101
-2 votes
3 answers
248 views

Herewith versus herein. In this situation, is one or the other more grammatically correct and/or sense correct?

Without thinking, I typed to matt there Will do! I'll post it herein .. But it gave me pause; I tapped edit and Will do! I'll post it herewith .. Now I don't know which version of me had the ...
Fattie's user avatar
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differences of usage with conjunctive adverb

a) You must have a good reason for possession of a bladed instrument. It will have to be genuine, for example, someone back packing may use one for the preparation of meals. b) You can put knives in ...
bluebell1's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
159 views

Is "Put together" a phrasal verb?

She put all the flowers together in one big bunch. Is "put together" a phrasal verb in this sentence? Or is "together" an adverb?
darkhealer's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
55 views

Can we say 'where did you visit'? [duplicate]

Can we say the following: "Where did you visit?" Where means 'in/at which place', so 'visit' should not precede 'in which place', but my native English-speaker colleague said ok, which ...
Louis Liu's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
99 views

"So" and "yet" as conjunctive adverbs rather than coordinators

I have recently been digging into the "FANBOYS" concept and how "so," "yet," and "for" are not truly coordinating conjunctions in the same vein as the other ...
GrammarCop's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
73 views

Ordinal Adverbs - last or lastly?

If a list is ordered 'first', 'next' would you finish with 'last' or 'lastly'? I'm really interested to get both a UK and US take on this please. (Finally is not an option here, as it's for a poem ...
Roo's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
216 views

Why can we say "is your mother home?" but we can't say ''is the boss office?" [duplicate]

Why can we say "Is your mother home?" but we can't say "is the boss office?" originally Why to ask if someone is at home? you can say "is your mother home?", but you can'...
behnam nouri's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
106 views

Why are "all together" and "altogether" exact homophones in American English?

This question was inspired by the interesting discussion here: Why isn't the T in "relative" flapped? It seems like the adverb already and the two-word phrase all ready should be ...
Quack E. Duck's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
84 views

Adverbs in the Middle Position BUT WHERE?

In the book English Grammar in Use, on page number 220. there is - If the verb is two or more words (for example, can remember / will be cancelled), the adverb usually goes after the first verb (can/...
hwkal's user avatar
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0 answers
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Correct/correctly [duplicate]

Congratulations for spelling all your words correct. I would use “correctly” rather than “correct”. Can anyone explain why they use an adjective (correct) instead of an adverb (correctly) in this ...
Cristina's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
130 views

Can the adverb "perfectly" modify the verb "to be"?

Such students may be perfectly at home with the language of an ode or a classical play, [...] [Source] In a formal written language, isn't it grammatically incorrect to use, instead of an adjective, ...
TROUZINE Abderrezaq's user avatar
9 votes
2 answers
3k views

"Don't take it personally" vs. "Don't take it personal"

I believe usage trumps authority when it comes to the rules of English. However, I also believe that errors are just errors. I keep hearing "ly" being left off of words even in common idioms....
candied_orange's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
65 views

Why doesn’t small have a regular adverbial form? [closed]

Loud => loudly Soft => softly Large => largely Small => ???
TylerDurden's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
44 views

Can Aspectual-Related Words like 'Still' and 'Already' Function as Modifiers in an Adjective Phrase?

This question closely ties into a question I had about verbless clauses. However, I am writing a new one at the suggestion of a user. Polarity-sensitive aspectual-related words are those such as '...
MJ Ada's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
72 views

cause + noun + to infinitive

Once you’re on your journey, certain wheels cause friction to control movement toward either side of the track, resulting in a loss of energy. Does "to control" specify the verb "cause&...
HanJe Bae's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
91 views

position of 'ever' with a perfect gerund

The adverb 'ever' usually comes in mid-position, that is before the verb, after the auxiliary – if there is one – and after the first auxiliary if there are more than one. (Practical English Usage, ...
user58319's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
62 views

Can I use thereof to refer to a single subject? If not - what would be an alternative?

Is usage of "thereof" in a title: Confirming feasibility of attack and investigating improvements to range and reliability thereof correct? My intuition says it is not, but it would be a ...
Nikolai Savulkin's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
482 views

“Out of” or “Outside” the box

For composition reasons and how it sound I would like to create a design called “creativity out of the box” but Im not sure if is correct or should be “outside”. Which one is correct?
Cleber Machado's user avatar
6 votes
3 answers
599 views

Difference in logical inevitability between therefore/thus/hence

I am trying to figure out the difference in the degrees of logical inevitability that the words therefore, thus, and hence express, when used in academic scientific writing. Glenn Paquette explains in ...
Masa Sakano's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
253 views

When should I use “inasmuch” vs “inasmuch as”?

I am wondering whether it is possible to use “inasmuch” without “as” right after. Consider the following sentences: This paper agrees with author (year), inasmuch it reaches a similar conclusion. This ...
EoDmnFOr3q's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
90 views

Why “…, like,…”?

Can someone explain why I need to set off the adverb like with commas? I saw The New Yorker use it in a recent article, A senior defense official told me that Kahl was surprised by whom he was about ...
Tiffany Baker's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
40 views

Is it correct to write "feast luxurious" instead of "feast luxuriously"? [duplicate]

And much there is on which my ear and eye Can feast luxurious. The preceding sentence is a line from a sonnet by Michael Madhusudan Dutt (1824–1873). Is it correct to write "feast luxurious"...
anjan 's user avatar
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4 votes
3 answers
192 views

What's up with -ly-based: -based as a suffix on non-nouns

I have always thought that the English "-based" suffix (plant-based diet, English-based creole languages, etc.) worked only on nouns. Adjectives, e.g. "large-based" or "sweet-...
tomsmeding's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
31 views

Which one is better "all incurred expenses" or "all expenses incurred?" [duplicate]

I am writing this document for HR at work and wish to outline what our staff should do to get reimbursed. The sentence should be something along the lines of... All incurred expenses/expenses ...
Khouloud Khamassi's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
194 views

Slow or slowly? [closed]

Is this correct: "I want to start slow, then gradually increase the time I exercise." Or should it say "slowly"?
lsavely's user avatar
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4 votes
5 answers
446 views

Adverb for when a person has never questioned something they believe [duplicate]

What's an adverb to put behind "believe" when you're trying to communicate that a person has never questioned the thing they believe? Example: Everything you've [ideal adverb] believed since ...
Lopz's user avatar
  • 51
1 vote
3 answers
153 views

"When" + future perfect usage

A Scots friend of mine corrected my usage of future perfect in this construction: Right, see you in five years when your mother tongue will have taken another ten steps back. Maybe the construction ...
Titus Toia's user avatar
1 vote
3 answers
696 views

Stative verbs and adjectives/adverbs

Premise: Verb 'want' is normally (?) stative We use adverbs when we have an action verb and adjectives when the verb is stative In sentence "I want it bad(ly)" we would use the adverb '...
Imp's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
36 views

Is lovelyly the adverbal form of lovely? [duplicate]

We could say it was painted beautifully to convey that the way it was painted was beautiful. "beautifully" being the adverbal form of beautiful (an adjective). What if the adjective is &...
Bohemian's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
43 views

When an Adjective Is Used with “Kept” (and Possibly Other Participles?), Does It Become an Adverb? [duplicate]

In phrases with “kept” (and perhaps there are other participles that have the same effect?), such as: He kept it secret. It was kept hidden. Do these (nominal) adjectives function effectively as ...
Avana Vana's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
130 views

Resounding positive vs resoundingly positive [closed]

When describing a situation where only positive feedback was received, which one is correct: We received resoundingly positive feedback We received resounding positive feedback To my ears Nr 1. ...
Claude Hasler's user avatar
9 votes
5 answers
2k views

Are there any adverbs ending in -ly without an adjectival counterpart?

Just as underwhelm/overwhelm exist without any usage of 'whelmed' (generally speaking) I'm wondering if there's any adverb ending in -ly without an adjectival counterpart (or that has dropped out of ...
jMan's user avatar
  • 386
2 votes
1 answer
96 views

What is the adverb you use when something increases drastically?

What is the adverb that is commonly used when describing something rapidly/drastically increasing? It's on the tip of my tongue and I can't get it out. It's not tenfold, rapidly, drastically, ...
karmaisanorangecat's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
134 views

Proper Usage of "Too" in the Middle of a Sentence

I'm curious about the acceptability of using the adverb "too" in the middle of a sentence right after the contraction "there's." Specifically, I want to know whether "too"...
TonyCrudor's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
22 views

Adverb use in sentence [closed]

Never,ever is it adverb? I have problem with use adverb in a sentence with auxiliary verb.
Md Zahidul Islam Zahid's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
55 views

Adverb Nowhere/Anywhere/Somewhere

I understand that anywhere is an adverb in this sentence: We couldn't go anywhere nice to eat. However, I am a little confused about how nice to eat is explained. nice and to eat both modify the ...
user480565's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
77 views

From which form of "longing" is the adverb "longingly" derived?

"Longingly" is the adverb form of "longing". Depending on where you look, "longing" is described as an adjective, a verb, or a noun: Oxford defines it as either a noun ...
Polynomial's user avatar
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0 votes
3 answers
99 views

Adverb of time position in a sentence

I would like to know which of the following sentences is correct: Ideally, we should leave tomorrow early OR Ideally, we should leave early tomorrow? I know an adverb of time comes after the verb ...
Mary's user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
1 answer
110 views

Is “if they are still not…” right and what is an alternative way to phrase this? [closed]

The sentence was this: In his process of dying; the children, if they are still not independent of his guidance, shall perish. The expression 'are still not' does not seem grammatically correct. ...
Aurelius's user avatar
  • 113
3 votes
2 answers
291 views

When and where did 'irregardless' first emerge in print, how did it spread, and to what extent was it viewed as a dialectal word?

Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2003) has the following entry for irregardless: irregardless adv {prob[ably a] blend of irrespective and regardless} ca. 1912) nonstand[ard] : ...
Sven Yargs's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
257 views

What part of speech is "not" when it takes the place of a conjunction?

What part of speech is "not" in the following sentences, and why? I made him do it, not her. To solve a linear system neatly is only the primary and most straightforward use of the matrix, ...
thb's user avatar
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