Questions tagged [adverbs]

An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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Graded/ungraded adjectives and grading/non-grading adverbs

I saw in the Farlex Grammar Book an explanation of gradable adjectives and graded adverbs. It lists the following words as examples of each category: Gradable adjectives small cold hot difficult sad ...
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1answer
135 views

What part of speech is *almost* in this sentence - *These tiny flowers transform into pulp-filled pods almost the size of rugby balls.*

Now, before I get jumped on because almost is always an adverb, please allow me to explain. If almost is an adverb, which it most definitely is (I checked several dictionaries and it is only listed ...
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5answers
102 views

How can I say “usually one, sometimes multiple” at the end of a sentence?

I'm struggling with this sentence fragment: “...and produces usually one, sometimes multiple, binary outputs.” Is this grammatically correct? Is there a better way to structure this? Here is the ...
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2answers
124 views

Use of an adjective instead of adverb with gerund?

I keep hearing on the BBC channel their self-commercial that goes like "We are the leaders in global breaking news". Folks, could anybody kindly explain to me how come that structure is grammatically ...
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1answer
192 views

Use of “here” in the middle or at the end of the sentence

I have two sentences, and the location of here bothers me. Could you help me figure out whether it's possible to use both of them or only one sentence is correct? The object here is the chair. The ...
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141 views

Why is “shut” an adjective in “locked shut”?

Definition of 'shut' in Collins English Dictionary. Shut is also an adjective, with example sentence "The exit doors were locked shut." I wonder why 'shut' in this sentence is an ADJECTIVE not an ...
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1answer
212 views

Can a word function as a relative adverb and a relative pronoun simultaneously?

For example in a sentence like "This is the place where he was murdered", is where functioning as both a relative adverb and a relative pronoun? Here where acts as pronoun as it refers back to its ...
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0answers
9k views

Similar vs Similarly to

This is related to the following questions, 1, 2. In many papers in mathematics, I often see the following constructions. Similar to [1], we have that 2+ax = 3y. Similar to Equation 2.3, we ...
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99 views

Adverb or a conjunction?

Good afternoon everyone! I was doing a syntactic analysis of the sentence below and stuck at the adverb: Bring as many books as there are students (you) ---> subject bring ---> verb as many books ...
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0answers
128 views

Is “over” meaning “again” related to “over”'s other meanings?

In addition to the physical position meaning, "over" has a number of nonphysical and temporal meanings including "again". My own examples: I couldn't read your note. Write it over. Take one ...
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489 views

Adverb for a third of a year

Similar to Is there a proper term to describe 1/3 of a year (4 months) Are there any words to describe a trimester as an adverb? The only one I've seen is triannually (in the link above) which is a ...
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1answer
3k views

On the weekend vs this weekend

Could you tell me which sounds natural? I will finish it on the weekend. I will finish it this weekend. How does "this weekend" differ from "on the weekend?" I heard that the time expressions which ...
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1answer
39 views

The usage of commas with the word “additionally”

Good time of the day. I just want to clarify something with your help. Can you please tell me should one opt to insert a comma before and after the word "additionally" in this instance? "Referring ...
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54 views

“to be more precise” vs. “to be more precisely”

While proofreading the thesis of a colleague, I came across the phrase "to be more precisely" and corrected it to "to be more precise". I'm pretty sure that my correction is correct but I have trouble ...
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51 views

the adverb “all” as a direct object

merriam-webster.com: 1. I forgot all about paying the bill. collinsdictionary.com: 2. He loves animals and he knows all about them. As written in the dictionaries, "all" is an adverb ...
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80 views

Why is the adjective “below” rare compared to adjective “above”?

Above and below can be used as both an adverb and an adjective to indicate an earlier or a later part of a piece of writing respectively. However, adjective below is rare compared to adjective above (...
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29 views

Speculations and deductions

I am very curious to know if: “ She probably should have had the cake" is grammatically correct.In other words Iam in doubt whether we can use adverbs of certainty, like probably, along with ...
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157 views

act weird/weirdly vs. act strange/strangely

According to this ngram, 'act weird' is much more productive than 'act weirdly', which is almost non-existent, but 'act strangely' is more productive than 'act strange', which is not non-existent at ...
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33 views

Phrasal prepositional verbs with objects and adverbs?

"We fixed Tom up quickly with new tools" Hi guys, here's a doubt I have. Although I would more than likely place the adverb "quickly" between the subject "We" and verb "fixed" in this sentence to ...
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32 views

Difference among You never change. and You change never. and Never do you change

I think "You never change." is the most usual and basic. But "You change never." is also well used in spoken English. "Never do you change." is almost never seen on books and heard in conversations. I ...
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44 views

by (the) way: incidentally

Microsoft® Encarta® 2009. defines incidentally as by way: used to introduce additional information such as something that the speaker has just thought of by chance: by chance or by accident Is the ...
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656 views

Punctuation for 'and therefore', 'and as a result' etc when they don't introduce an independent clause

I have seen similar questions regarding 'and therefore' when it introduces an independent clause, and the favourite seems to be '..., and, therefore, ...' to punctuate without making 'therefore' the ...
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31 views

How to understand 'in" in the sentence?

The original sentence: If the water was moving with the wave, the ocean and everything on it would be racing in to the shore with obviously catastrophic results. Two questions: I like to ...
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139 views

Is there an adverb that means “according to my knowledge” or “if I remember correctly”?

I find it useful to give such a disclaimer when stating something from memory or personal knowledge but which I would not guarantee to be correct. However, saying, e.g., "according to my knowledge" ...
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144 views

What is the relation between a verb and an adverb (officially) called?

What does an adverb "do" to a verb? When googling I found terms like modifies or describes, but I'm not sure if a name for the relation exists.
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42 views

Is it possible to use the adverb 'now' in the past?

I learn pluperfect in German and recently ran into a web-page with English-German examples. One of the example seems to me incorrect, so I am bringing this out to make sure I correctly understand the ...
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41 views

Is it redundant to add implied words after infinitive (eg “to share” vs “to share together”)

I wanted to write something in a message to my department that essentially says "I am thankful for this home we share"...however I initially thought that I would emphasize the cohesion of the group by ...
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418 views

Correct way to use the word “respectively”

I have the following sentence: Moreover, we use adjectives 'Borel' and 'finite' if, respectively, a measure is defined on the Borel sigma-algebra and it has finite values only. Usually I put '...
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579 views

“Most” as an intensifier, not as a superlative

Sometimes “most” is used as an intensifier rather than a superlative: “Lucy expressed herself most eloquently.” “The employees work most efficiently.” There are other degree adverbs that do ...
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198 views

Can we say “Some things end good, some things end bad” in informal American/Britain English?

I have a question about this sentence: Some things end good, some things end bad Could it be safely written in poetry or in the lyrics of a song? I know that there are the adverbs well and badly, ...
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39 views

Placement of adverb in independent clause preceded by dependent clause

Which sentence is correct? To simplify the notation, we will denote henceforth the distance by d. To simplify the notation, henceforth we will denote the distance by d.
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232 views

Adverb in a introductory clause

I have stumbled upon this sentence: But more pragmatically, the discipline encourages students to analyze complex material, question conventional beliefs, and express thoughts in a concise manner. ...
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86 views

Adverbs and adverbials

I am really confused on the this topic, could someone please help? In a phrase like,"Come on up." I know "up" modifies "come on." What happens when you are able to switch positions of adverbs and ...
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103 views

Multiple Modifiers

What does not modify in this sentence? I am not even playing basketball. Also, does quickly modify played the game or just played in this sentence? I played the game quickly.
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300 views

'Sparsely' vs 'Thinly'

What is the difference between sparsely and thinly? Can these words be interchangeable? May I use thinly furnished or thinly populated as well as sparsely furnished and thinly populated.
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715 views

Can an adverb be placed between a verb and its direct object?

The direct object usually follows the verb, not the adverb. For example, we say I love you deeply instead of I love deeply you. However, there are instances where the direct object is so long that the ...
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1answer
77 views

A small sliver of moon rock

In the following sentences, does 'small' function as an adverb or an adjective? Visitors will be astounded at the amazing exhibits; one of these is a small sliver of moon rock that visitors are ...
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1answer
48 views

How to use adverbs with “obligated”?

I'm pretty sure all of the following are correct and "normal": You are obligated to wash your hands before returning to work. The government obligate hand-washing of restaurant staff. I am capable of ...
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2answers
32 views

“detect opportunely” vs “opportunely detect”?

In the next phrase: Only a few doctors assess their patients about the type and frequency of the tests they should be doing to detect opportunely and prevent such diseases, but we will help you ...
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1answer
206 views

From before, from aforementioned

Can before and aforementioned be used in a similar way to above? Context: Say I'm writing a report, and would like to reference an earlier bit. If that earlier bit is in close proximity or follows ...
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1answer
2k views

Therefore in the middle of a sentence

Their orientation is therefore well described by... Does this use of therefore in the middle of the sentence, reduce fluidity or sound not suitable for a written text? Should I use commas instead? ...
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1answer
2k views

Is it ok to use “finally” at the end of the sentence like this?

Is it OK to use finally at the end of the sentence like this? I am a teacher finally. Or are the below ones only possible? I finally am a teacher. I am finally a teacher. Most people ...
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2answers
108 views

Deceptively attractive

If I mention that someone is not good looking once you see them up close, does that make them “deceptively attractive” or “deceptively unattractive?” My friend and I are having a discussion about ...
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2answers
288 views

Adjective or adverb? Confusion!

Could someone point out for me that which of the following choices is accurate? Even though I understand that my comments were offensive, you should cut me a break because I only meant them (joking/...
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1answer
38 views

“but” followed by adverb

Is the usage "but implicitly" in the following sentence correct? B is also assumed but implicitly. The context is as follows. We know that both "A" and "B" are assumed. But compared with "A", the ...
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33 views

What word to say “should not happened” paired with 'expenses' - bad in nature but unavoidable and not rude

Is there suitable word when paired with 'expenses' to mean "should not have happened"? I want to say there were some bad expenses that should not happened but were unavoidable. At the same time not ...
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40 views

“not” is an adverb with special positioning (like “do solemnly swear”)— are there others? Is there a name for this positioning?

Adverbs allow for a range of positions, but focusing how a adverb might be positioned relative to a verb phrase, "always" allows (But is not limited to): For single verb phrases, "always" can go ...
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32 views

Adverb-preposition placement: “consists exclusively of” vs. “consists of exclusively”

Building on the question here, I am trying to better understand the difference in use and meaning implied by the change of the adverb position against the preposition in the following sentence: (1)...
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1answer
46 views

Adjective of quality problem

Why is He is cowardly not correct as cowardly is acting as an adjective of quality? While He is intelligent is correct.
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106 views

The comparison using a single “not”

Today I'd like to present my question about the passablity of what I'll post below. Just as I talked with my american friends(I am Japanese) on discord, a certain person said to me; Are romantic ...