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An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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Why is it incorrect to say “I lonely walked around the park.”?

And how do I say it right? This should be an explanation: but I still don't understand that why does the sentence "I lonely walked around the park" does not make any sense
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Meaning of Provided as an adverb

Is it possible to use "provided" as an adeverb of a meaning of "however"? I read this translation today, and according to the original Korean sentence, "provided" means "however" here. Equivalent ...
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35 views

An adverb describing “changing between A and B repeatedly and subsequently”

I'm looking for an adverb for describing "changing between A and B repeatedly and subsequently". (I'm not sure I used the word "subsequently" correctly.) For example, Amy and Bob needs to press the ...
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18 views

“so” and “this” as adverbs meaning “to a degree”

Recently, a non-native speaker asked me whether they should say "Why is it so cold?" or "Why is is this cold?". While clearly the former is much more common, I struggled to explain why. Cambridge ...
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40 views

How to use “frequently” correctly? [on hold]

I wrote the following sentence, but I think the word "frequently" is not used correctly. Turning on and off the machines frequently may damage them. Can you help me?
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30 views

<that is to say> used after a rephrasing synonym of the conjunction 'or'

I'd like to know whether this structure is grammatically O.K.: "In a secondary, or derivative, sense, that is to say, the others is subject of the clause". The Cambridge Grammar of the Engish ...
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2answers
51 views

Use of “Some” when referring to quantities

In journalistic and quasi-academic writing, I've recently noticed an increasing tendency to use "some" as an adverb when referring to quantities. For example in the sentence: "In Indonesia, fish ...
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1answer
47 views

Apparently, I've been wrong

Apparently, I may not be using apparently correctly! Here's my question: Can I use apparently at the end of a sentence for effect (or affect!): I already told you what I was doing for ...
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25 views

Comma before adverb at the end of a sentence?

But, so far, cooking was merely a hobby, something she would surely get tired of eventually. In this sentence, should I add a comma before "eventually"? I think it would make the sentence easier to ...
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0answers
35 views

Unwittingly, it was already noon [closed]

Unwittingly, it was already noon. Is the use of unwittingly right? It is an adverb, and as an adverb, it should come with a verb. But somehow it sounded right, that's why I'm asking here. I was ...
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0answers
54 views

Adjectives as adverb

Let’s say that someone owe $100 to someone but he paid $90 . I mean he paid $10 less than his dept . In this case can we say “ he paid 10 dollar missing “ . If this is correct , i wonder how the ...
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14 views

The order of Adverb in comparison with “to be” and “auxiliary” [closed]

Between 2 following sentences, which one is correct (or more natural) in terms of the grammatical order: This may help to reduce pollution inside the city and the population density will also be ...
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44 views

How to express that A is about B with emphasis on “directly?”

I would like to say "(A term) is defined broadly in this paper, which includes not only the uses of knowledge and measurement directly about B, but also the ones indirectly about B, such as C." Is it ...
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0answers
18 views

What is an adverb to describe using any type of personal technology?

This generalized word would encompass texting, emailing, writing, searching, reading, viewing any media or talking to a person or AI through a personal technology device.
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24 views

Which is more academical? close to or approximately

Which is more academical? 1st system Efficiency is close to 75% higher than system 2 1st system Efficiency is approximately 75% higher than system 2
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25 views

“Probably also had” vs. “had probably also”

Is this word order fine: The tools probably also had a ritual character. or is the following order preferable? The tools had probably also a ritual character.
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1answer
14 views

Replacement for “many” after the noun?

I have the following (half-) sentence: This dreadful monotony plagues many classrooms, but (...) However, I found this phrasing unsatisfactory, as I would like to avoid using "many", if possible. ...
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1answer
51 views

Appropriate Synonym for 'accelerated' in thesis title [closed]

I have the following thesis title: On the acceleration of X Methods: superfast Y Solver for Z My thesis goal and reached objective is "Improving X and using it into Y, which becomes very fast". I ...
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2answers
63 views

“It can be really exciting” vs. “it can really be exciting”

I bumped into a question concerning the place where the "really" should be. I get confused because Google seems to have more results for "it can be really exciting", so I wonder which one is correct....
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41 views

take it hard or take it hardly?

At the end of the fourth sentence of the following paragraph, you will the expression"takes it hardly". You know the adverb "hardly" is used in an abnormal way. Could you please explain what it means ...
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0answers
3 views

what is reference of adverb? [migrated]

We can see why the non-reductive understanding of the computational theory fits into scientific theorizing generally. What is the reference of "generally" exactly? Fits or theorizing?
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31 views

use of “respectively” after a repetitive noun

I found several threads addressing the use of "respectively". But none covered my scenario. I'm wondering whether the following sentence works? A and B were used as (a) positive (control) and (...
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1answer
78 views

What exactly is a flat adverb?

I know that a flat adverb is an adverb that has the same form as its related adjective, but does that mean any adverb without the -ly suffix is grammatically correct? For instance, if I said I am “...
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3answers
57 views

“Typical liberal bulls-t” or “typically liberal bulls-t”?

My liberal friend wrote that he's gonna do some research soon. I asked, "Into what?" "[Redacted.] Typically liberal bullshit," he replied self-depricatingly. Then he corrects himself: "*typical" But ...
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1answer
133 views

How to use “instead” at end of sentence

I'm not sure if there should be a comma after 'said' in this situation. I'm picky about punctuation and want to discover what is acceptable. Can't find any similar questions/answers. - Which (maybe ...
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1answer
82 views

What part of speech is “back” in “If you want it back”?

If you want it back ... I'm doing a school project and need to figure out parts of speech in my letter that I wrote, but, I dont know what "back" is, can anyone help?
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1answer
22 views

Is “well” an adjective?

I read a Cambridge advanced grammar in use and there's one line says We can use sufficiently before adjectives to express a similar meaning to enough. Sufficiently is often preferred in more formal ...
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1answer
41 views

'Every two' as synonymous with 'every other'

In the sentence "a copy for every two people", i.e. 'to share", would every two be synomymous with every other, where the latter would be used in the same sense as it is used in "I used to visit her ...
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2answers
62 views

Usage of “ever” [closed]

Which one is correct: This is one of our favorite ever holidays! or This is one of our favorite holidays ever! Thanks a lot.
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1answer
140 views

“leave immediately, sooner if possible”

In the series Shameless.US, S06E10, an actress utters "leave immediately, sooner if possible". Is this idiomatic? I'd like to know why sooner refers to.
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1answer
34 views

“in favor” used adverbially

I'd like to know whether the phrase "in favor" can be used adverbially, e.g. They all voted in favor.
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0answers
52 views

Why is “shut” an adjective in “locked shut”?

Definition of 'shut' in Collins English Dictionary. Shut is also an adjective, with example sentence "The exit doors were locked shut." I wonder why 'shut' in this sentence is an ADJECTIVE not an ...
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0answers
66 views

Is there an adverb that means “according to my knowledge” or “if I remember correctly”?

I find it useful to give such a disclaimer when stating something from memory or personal knowledge but which I would not guarantee to be correct. However, saying, e.g., "according to my knowledge" ...
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2answers
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replacing adverbs

I am trying to rewrite the sentence below to replace the adverb 'far' (simply because I want to have as few adverbs as possible in my manuscript): Specifically, their approach adds rejected ...
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3answers
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adverbs after linking verbs

They write we must use adjectives rather than adverbs after linking verbs. For example https://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/british/taste_2: Food can taste sweet like sugar. But here's ...
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3answers
86 views

Is this an independent or dependent clause?

Look at the following example 'But she was so tired, she did not finish painting.' Is the first clause an independent or dependent clause? If it is an independent clause, should I remove the comma ...
2
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1answer
145 views

How to use “same” as an adverb?

I have the following sentence: An uncommitted player reacts to different alliance types the same. I may as well say “...in the same way” but want to keep it short if possible. Is this a correct ...
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A situation when two or more people speak at the same time

The word or phrase I am looking for is quite opposite to that of the situation when people, such as students or sports players, sing their national anthem with the same tone and words. I want a ...
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2answers
61 views

Is it wrong to use these adverbs 'a bit, a little, too' with adjectives 'good, nice, cheap, clean, new, comfortable.'

I was looking through an English book and came across a rule that has confused me; I dont remember reading it anywhere before(but I am not that well read anyway); Don't use these adverbs(a bit, a ...
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2answers
43 views

Can there be a comma between the adverb and the noun of the last member of a series?

I saw a practice SAT question on Khan Academy: Certified Executive Chef Hilary DeMane has prepared confections for celebrities, governors, and even Ronald Reagan. The correct answer is filled in ...
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2answers
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Is “deacceleratingly” a valid word?

Deaccelerate means the same as decelerate, though it seems to be a much less common alternative. I did not know this until recently, as I had used this alternative all my life. It just seemed logical ...
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61 views

What's the adverb version of “pleased”

I want to say "she had a pleased smile on her face" but in the form of "she smiled pleased(-ly?)". I just can't seem to find the right word. It's driving me nuts.
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2answers
53 views

Adverb versus Adjective in -minded people

I am currently running for the Board of Education in my little town and am working on my candidate statement for the election handbook that the Department of Elections produces. I sent what I had to ...
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1answer
176 views

Do you put a comma around “as well”

Would I write, "He, as well, no longer held the need to impress her" or "He as well no longer held the need to impress her"? Which is grammatically correct?
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1answer
29 views

Two adverbs, and an indefinite article

I found two adverbs, between which indefinite article, in TVTRopes site: Upon reading it, the host concludes that it's actually a really old joke that everyone knows. Is it grammatical to ...
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2answers
59 views

What is the grammatical name for these words? [closed]

What is the grammatical category of the following words called: perhaps, therefore, hence, nevertheless, etc.?
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1answer
41 views

Using of adverbs very and really before an adjective

He was really frightened. It seemed to him as his nightmare came true. He was very frightened. It seemed to him as his nightmare came true. What is the difference between these two sentences in ...
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1answer
42 views

There was vs. was

Recently, a native English speaker (I'm not) suggested I'd improve a sentence of mine by removing a superfluous there: Against the wall there was a yellow bicycle. This made me think: is there any ...
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1answer
113 views

Usage of “about” as a preposition and adverb [closed]

I got the following examples, but couldn't identify, whether these are adverbs or prepositions? He is always talking about how clever his children are. I wish you'd stop making jokes about my ...
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1answer
136 views

Past modals and the passive: which one is correct?

Considering easily as an attitude or manner adverb, which of the following is correct? He could easily have been killed. or He could have been easily killed.