Questions tagged [adverbs]

An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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1answer
48 views

Is “especially” always an adverb?

I am wondering whether especially is always an adverb, specifically when used in this context: We must be wary of your surroundings, especially in the city. I do not think that it modifies any ...
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0answers
5 views

Is there any difference in meaning between “how” and “what” when each is used to start a subordinate clause? [migrated]

Is there any difference between how and what in the following sentence? Anny was just telling Wendy how she liked to eat the ice cream at the shop. Anny was just telling Wendy what she liked to eat ...
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1answer
26 views

Adjective of quality problem

Why is He is cowardly not correct as cowardly is acting as an adjective of quality? While He is intelligent is correct.
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4answers
5k views

Why is “dark” an adverb in “dark blue”?

The sky is dark blue. Source: BBC English Catherine: The sky is dark blue. The sky is dark blue. Finn: So, is blue an adjective or adverb? Catherine: It’s an adjective. Blue is ...
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38 views

Where should I place “very often”? [closed]

Which one of these two sentences would be correct? It can be found very often in his poetry. It can be very often found in his poetry.
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2answers
75 views

Is there an adverb for “ungodly”?

All dictionaries listed ungodly only as an adjective. Ungodlily was listed on Word Hippo, but I'm not so sure if it's reliable. So, is there an adverb for ungodly, and if so, what is it? Ungodlily ...
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0answers
23 views

Degree of some adverbs + adjective

The rules of this board game is : Very complex Very intricate Extremely complex Extraordinarily complex Very involved Super complex Can we sort these six from lower to higher ( difficulty level / ...
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0answers
32 views

Early Language Development

I have always been stuck on the word "there". I have a young child who says "there it". I would say adverb in most contexts but in the context of this utterance I would classify "there" as a ...
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2answers
36 views

What's the difference between “have you seen?” and “have you ever seen?”

I've searched high and low and can't find an explanation to show what is the difference. Is 'ever' for emphasis here?
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1answer
42 views

“Let's go somewhere” vs “let's go anywhere”? [closed]

Are these two sentences grammatically correct and do they carry the same meaning? My textbook suggests 1 as the correct form but 2 sounds ok as well to me. Let's go somewhere warm and sunny. Let's go ...
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0answers
27 views

Is the use of all correct

In the following sentence I am vexed at him for what all he has done for him till date. I think the above sentence is wrong because the determiner all is placed before numbers, my, your, etc. ...
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1answer
48 views

Meaning of ON at the end of a sentence

There is ON at the end of the following sentence. Remaining aloof was no longer safe under the restored democracy of 403 on. 403 is the year. I think without it the sentence makes sense enough. I ...
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1answer
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Complexly assembled part or Complex assembled part?

I would like to know if I need to use an adverb or an adjective to closer characterize a verb used as an adjective? E.g. "Complexly assembled part" or "Complex assembled part"
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22 views

Can “and” be used to introduce a conclusion?

Stupid example: John was born in June 8th, 1983. Today is June 8th. Therefore, today is John's birthday. Could "Therefore" be replaced by, simply, "and", or would it be awkward?: John was born ...
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47 views

Punctuation for 'and therefore', 'and as a result' etc when they don't introduce an independent clause

I have seen similar questions regarding 'and therefore' when it introduces an independent clause, and the favourite seems to be '..., and, therefore, ...' to punctuate without making 'therefore' the ...
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2answers
55 views

Is there an adverb for “on working days only”

I am writing (yet another) calendar software which should also support recurrent entries/events, i.e. entries that repeat in certain intervals. So far I have: "daily" - happens every day "weekly" - ...
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1answer
28 views

Adverb meaning “to where”?

"whence" means "from where" or "from which". Does English have an analogous meaning "to where?"
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1answer
44 views

What part-of-speech is “all” in these sentences?

These different dictionarys don't agree about what part-of-speech "all" is when it goes between subject and verb: For Cambridge dictionary is an adverb The kids all go to school on the same bus. ...
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2answers
41 views

Word for someone who performs task [closed]

I am working on a record, documenting archived data. I need a single word to describe someone who enters data, disposes of records. Example of a tab I have created: Disposal (Name). I would like to ...
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1answer
33 views

How to use adverbs with “obligated”?

I'm pretty sure all of the following are correct and "normal": You are obligated to wash your hands before returning to work. The government obligate hand-washing of restaurant staff. I am capable of ...
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2answers
22 views

and thus entering they occupied

This is a sentence from Chapter 3 of Guns, Germs and Steels: These Indian squadrons began to enter the plaza to the accompaniment of great songs, and thus entering they occupied every part of the ...
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1answer
34 views

The structure of “Even if China and America stop short of conflict, blabla…”

What is the structure of "stop short of conflict"? Is it "stop + short of conflict" or "stop short + of conflict"?
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0answers
30 views

How to understand 'in" in the sentence?

The original sentence: If the water was moving with the wave, the ocean and everything on it would be racing in to the shore with obviously catastrophic results. Two questions: I like to ...
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1answer
26 views

Is it natural to use 'once' with 'used to'?

Is it natural to use 'once used to' as in the following construction? I once used to read the Times everyday.
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0answers
21 views

Origin of “too” (“also”)

Since the South Park joke My name is Kyle, too. Nice to meet you, Kyle-two. I am wondering and trying to avoid too. Wiktionary explains it as "deriving from the original meaning of "apart, ...
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0answers
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Which between the two is the right placement of the adverb “barely?” [duplicate]

a. Joanna took barely 17 minutes to complete her essay. b. Joanna barely took 17 minutes to complete her essay. I am aware that adverbs like "barely" should be before the main verb but I hope anyone ...
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1answer
47 views

Can we use hearty as an adverb?

In the movie '300', the protagonist King Leonidas has a famous dialogue. Spartans! Ready your breakfast and eat hearty, for tonight, we dine in hell! Here, I wanted to know if the usage of ...
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20answers
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An adverb for when you're not exaggerating

I want to say, Your situation is, without exaggerating, more severe than mine. However, I want to replace "without exaggerating" with an adverb. Something like "undoubtedly". Now I know the ...
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2answers
93 views

Use of an adjective instead of adverb with gerund?

I keep hearing on the BBC channel their self-commercial that goes like "We are the leaders in global breaking news". Folks, could anybody kindly explain to me how come that structure is grammatically ...
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2answers
75 views

Can an adjective clause modify an adverb clause?

I have read this sentence and got slightly confused. When my mother, who was only 18 when she had me, told me I should wait until I got older to marry Lucy, I knew she was really happy I met the ...
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3answers
345 views

Is the phrase “come fast” a grammatically correct imperative? [closed]

Is the following sentence grammatically correct as a command? "Come fast." I believe this would be a correct alternative: "Come quick."
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4answers
7k views

Is this toilet sign correct usage of the English language?

Our company has signs at the toilet that read Please leave the toilet properly Is that correct? My intuition would be that "properly" as an adverb would reference the action "leave" and not the ...
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2answers
82 views

Difference between adverb and adverbial adjunct

He arrived today. He arrived. Could we call adverb today as an adverbial adjunct because it still complete the meaning of sentence without it?
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1answer
133 views

Use of “in” vs. “During”

Which is more correct to use here? During or in? A PhD and MA holder are having a disagreement. During 1966, the program expanded to Gulkana and Wolverine glaciers in Alaska (Meier and others, 1971)...
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1answer
34 views

Can an adverb clause modify an infinitive?

The title is pretty self explanatory, in the sentence: It is difficult to travel through the huge expanse of parched sands in the Sahara Desert, where oases are plentiful but distant from each other....
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1answer
50 views

How would pretty be classified in this sentence [duplicate]

The sentence is "You look pretty tonight". I believe that pretty would be an adjective as it's referring to "You". However in the sentence "You look pretty gorgeous tonight" I believe that pretty ...
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2answers
55 views

“To read this book later” and “To later read this book” - the difference

There is a dialog between two persons, and they are discussing some book owned by third person. There are 2 versions of phrase: To read this book later -- ask John. To later read this book -- ask ...
2
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1answer
135 views

What's happening in this sentence using “far away”?

"David and Emma live far away in the mountains." What grammatical role do the words "far" and "away" have in that sentence? I realize that "far away" must be an adverbial, that can be both a ...
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2answers
62 views

“first time” as an adverb meaning “for the first time”

Can first time be used as an adverb meaning "for the first time", e.g. when I met him first time (Confession Tapes, third episode, 02:40)
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2answers
110 views

Beat bad vs beat badly [duplicate]

Is it correct to say that the use badly is only used when there is a negative conjugation? For example. When you beat someone at a game. Would you say you beat a person bad or badly? Because isn't ...
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3answers
167 views

Learning to end sentences with “hence”. Examples?

I dabble in creative writing here and there. Wordsmiths like Tolkien and Lovecraft are a pleasure to read for their sheer skill in sentence structure and plethora of words. I'm now attempting to ...
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1answer
56 views

Where should “efficiently” go? “…to use ___ the money we collected ___.”

I need to answer a business-related e-mail. Which one is correct grammatically? We request your approval to use efficiently the money we collected. We request your approval to use the money we ...
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1answer
59 views

Hello, which one is correct grammatically? [closed]

Please share your offers with me to evaluate. Please share your offers to evaluate with me. Please share with me to evaluate your offers.
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1answer
72 views

Specially vs especially

Which is the correct word for this sentence? There is one quality every swimmer should have: perseverance, specially for beginners who experience difficulties. There is one quality every swimmer ...
2
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1answer
67 views

Use of “here” in the middle or at the end of the sentence

I have two sentences, and the location of here bothers me. Could you help me figure out whether it's possible to use both of them or only one sentence is correct? The object here is the chair. The ...
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2answers
150 views

Graded/ungraded adjectives and grading/non-grading adverbs

I saw in the Farlex Grammar Book an explanation of gradable adjectives and graded adverbs. It lists the following words as examples of each category: Gradable adjectives small cold hot difficult sad ...
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2answers
291 views

Annual is to yearly as _____ is to monthly

A more formal word for yearly would be annual. I pay my school loans annually I pay my rent check monthly or _____. What is the “annual” version for “monthly’?
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2answers
130 views

around: adverb or preposition [closed]

He couldn't even enjoy the school holidays and spent his time moping around the house. Is the word "around" in the above sentence used as a preposition or as an adverb? I think it is used as a ...
1
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1answer
128 views

Adverb fascinated (deeply or extremely) [closed]

I am currently working on my essay and I am not too sure whether deeply or extremely fascinated is correct. It would be nice if somebody explained this to me because I think these two adverbs sound ...
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1answer
62 views

Please put the cup there. Is “Please” an adverb in this sentence [duplicate]

As per my understanding there is adverb in above sentence, but my English teacher is saying Please is the adverb in this sentence. If Please is the actual adverb in the sentence then what there will ...