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Questions tagged [adverbs]

An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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21 views

What's a word for the contents of a book are different and more helpful than the cover depicts

The book's cover is "People Can't Drive You Crazy If You Don't Give Them The Keys" but the content of the book is more about changing yourself and your perceptions and attitude and more. TOC snapshot, ...
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1answer
26 views

“However, I hated it extremely” vs “However, I extremely hated it,” when telling a flashback? [on hold]

Both of these probably mean the same thing but I don't know which one 'sounds' better.
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0answers
15 views

Adverbs in first of a sentence [closed]

Why do we sometimes put adverbs at the beginning of a sentence? Except for emphasis, I mean. Like: Nowadays, technology is improving. instead of: Technology is improving nowadays.
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1answer
38 views

Do I ever hyphenate adverbs when used with “based”? [duplicate]

I've seen it used both ways, but I'm wondering what is the proper way to punctuate phrases with adverbs and words like "based". example would be: academically-based instruction vs. academically based ...
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0answers
49 views

Adverb for not looking at anyone completely?

Which adverb should be used when not seeing anyone completely? That adverb should not necessarily have to do with the situation when any Indian bride hides her face by a veil, so that no body can see ...
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7answers
9k views

How do you say “in all directions” in a single word?

Consider the following example sentence: Sound is a form of energy that travels in all directions. How to do you say "in all directions" (which is shown as bold in example sentence) in a single ...
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1answer
36 views

What's a word for how long it takes to do something?

I'm trying to track how long it takes to do individual tasks throughout the day. I'm tracking it in Excel and want a single word for the time it took from beginning to completion to use in the column ...
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0answers
5 views

Why is there a “to” before increase? [migrated]

Today I read a sentence below: The employment rate has continued to rise in big cities thanks to the efforts of the local governments to increase it. Why is there a "to" used before word "increase", ...
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1answer
54 views

Are con­junc­tions like “and” al­lowed be­fore a tran­si­tion word?

In this sen­tence, is it gram­mat­i­cally cor­rect to use and be­fore con­se­quently? He did not sub­mit the ap­pli­ca­tion by the dead­line and con­se­quently, his ap­pli­ca­tion was not con­sid­...
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3answers
62 views

Onward at the beginning of a sentence

I want to say something like: from now on I will work on my second task. Is it correct to use "onward" (just onward) at the beginning of the sentence to replace "from now on"? Onward, I will work on ...
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1answer
33 views

“is believed to still be” or “is believed to be still”

I wonder which of the following is correct. It is believed to still be efficiently solvable. and It is believed to be still efficiently solvable.
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1answer
23 views

ADV of Manner between Transitive Verb and DO

In a book about the philosophy of William James, I have found the pattern transitive verb (to appreciate) + adverb of manner (fully) + direct object (what James means by distinguishing knowing into ...
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1answer
39 views

“everywhere” vs. “anywhere” vs. “somewhere”

Which one is correct to use? We usually stay home because it's more comfortable than go everywhere/anywhere/somewhere
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4answers
153 views

“currently is a …” or “is currently a …”

I'm not sure which statement is more correct. John has been with the team since 2010 and is currently a senior researcher OR John has been with the team since 2010 and currently is a senior ...
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4answers
52 views

How can I say “usually one, sometimes multiple” at the end of a sentence?

I'm struggling with this sentence fragment: “...and produces usually one, sometimes multiple, binary outputs.” Is this grammatically incorrect? Is there a better way to structure this? Here is the ...
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2answers
44 views

Especially + verb + Subject

I have just found the following sentence: Especially is this true in the field of psychology. I know the rule that says that whenever a sentence begins with an adverb that expresses negativity, it ...
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1answer
24 views

Starting an independent clause with “more,” to omit the use of the adverb “specifically”

Would it be incorrect English to do what I noted above? That is, if my sentence looked like this: [..]; more specifically,[..] Could I make it look like this: [..]; more,[..]
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3answers
121 views

due to vs because of

I know the 'due to vs because of' issue has been tackled here before, but I hope anybody can help me with this specific issue: Should it be: 'The tournament was cancelled due to disappointing ...
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2answers
64 views

Grammatical problem about very and much [closed]

I was very exhausted in the evening. She is very tired after a day's work. In the first sentence very can be replaced by much, but in the second sentence this is not the case. I need to ask why. ...
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0answers
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Using adverbs with determiners

I found this on Wikipedia: Possessive determiners may be modified with an adverb, as adjectives are, although not as freely or as commonly as is the case with adjectives. Such modification is ...
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2answers
23 views

“detect opportunely” vs “opportunely detect”?

In the next phrase: Only a few doctors assess their patients about the type and frequency of the tests they should be doing to detect opportunely and prevent such diseases, but we will help you ...
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1answer
46 views

“We also recently” or “We recently also”?

Title says it all. The sentence is We also recently started playing other games. or We recently also started playing other games. Which is preferable?
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1answer
41 views

On the Use of “nothing”

the statement 'nothing can be known' seems straightforward, right? 'nothing' is the subject, in which case the statement can be taken to mean that not a single thing can be known. and yet, is there ...
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1answer
42 views

“How” as relative adverb or indirect question

Today I'd like to ask you about the "practical" interpretative way of "how". That is, do you really distinguish an use as relative adverb from the one as indirect question?; For in spite of academic, ...
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2answers
64 views

The comparison using a single “not”

Today I'd like to present my question about the passablity of what I'll post below. Just as I talked with my american friends(I am Japanese) on discord, a certain person said to me; Are romantic ...
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0answers
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Can an increase be negative? [duplicate]

I'm working on an email to my supervisor with feedback about department meetings. I want to say: Our meetings have been increasingly less productive recently. I could probably re-word it to say "...
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1answer
41 views

Can I use 'vice versa' in this sentence?

The older they get, the more dogs become popular. As for cats, vice versa. What I want to say is: "Older people love dogs. Younger people love cats."
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1answer
83 views

Difference between “at this weekend” and “this weekend”

What's the difference between "at this weekend" and "this weekend" when they are used in a sentence. How do we use them correctly? For example, can I say " I am going to visit my friends at this ...
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1answer
74 views

Can “why” be a conjunction?

I was reading an article about the use of "why" as an adverb. I thought about what other function the word can have and came to the reasoning that it can be a conjunction joining clauses. I looked up ...
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1answer
32 views

Word-initial or -initially?

Quoting from OUP blog (+): As noted above, sure and sugar are such conspicuous monsters because word initially su– designates sh only in those two words. According to oxforddictionaries.com ...
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1answer
61 views

Very afraid or Very much afraid?

Can the adjective afraid be modified by very, or it should be very much instead? This site "English Grammar" say that 'Afraid' can be modified by ‘very much’. And it doesn't say anything about 'very ...
3
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1answer
60 views

Why is it incorrect to say “I lonely walked around the park.”? [closed]

And how do I say it right? This should be an explanation: but I still don't understand that why does the sentence "I lonely walked around the park" does not make any sense
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2answers
47 views

An adverb describing “changing between A and B repeatedly and subsequently”

I'm looking for an adverb for describing "changing between A and B repeatedly and subsequently". (I'm not sure I used the word "subsequently" correctly.) For example, Amy and Bob needs to press the ...
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1answer
22 views

“so” and “this” as adverbs meaning “to a degree”

Recently, a non-native speaker asked me whether they should say "Why is it so cold?" or "Why is is this cold?". While clearly the former is much more common, I struggled to explain why. Cambridge ...
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3answers
51 views

How to use “frequently” correctly? [closed]

I wrote the following sentence, but I think the word "frequently" is not used correctly. Turning on and off the machines frequently may damage them. Can you help me?
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2answers
57 views

Use of “Some” when referring to quantities

In journalistic and quasi-academic writing, I've recently noticed an increasing tendency to use "some" as an adverb when referring to quantities. For example in the sentence: "In Indonesia, fish ...
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1answer
73 views

Apparently, I've been wrong

Apparently, I may not be using apparently correctly! Here's my question: Can I use apparently at the end of a sentence for effect (or affect!): I already told you what I was doing for ...
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0answers
56 views

Adjectives as adverb

Let’s say that someone owe $100 to someone but he paid $90 . I mean he paid $10 less than his dept . In this case can we say “ he paid 10 dollar missing “ . If this is correct , i wonder how the ...
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1answer
15 views

Replacement for “many” after the noun?

I have the following (half-) sentence: This dreadful monotony plagues many classrooms, but (...) However, I found this phrasing unsatisfactory, as I would like to avoid using "many", if possible. ...
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1answer
71 views

Appropriate Synonym for 'accelerated' in thesis title [closed]

I have the following thesis title: On the acceleration of X Methods: superfast Y Solver for Z My thesis goal and reached objective is "Improving X and using it into Y, which becomes very fast". I ...
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2answers
94 views

“It can be really exciting” vs. “it can really be exciting”

I bumped into a question concerning the place where the "really" should be. I get confused because Google seems to have more results for "it can be really exciting", so I wonder which one is correct....
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1answer
81 views

What exactly is a flat adverb?

I know that a flat adverb is an adverb that has the same form as its related adjective, but does that mean any adverb without the -ly suffix is grammatically correct? For instance, if I said I am “...
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3answers
60 views

“Typical liberal bulls-t” or “typically liberal bulls-t”?

My liberal friend wrote that he's gonna do some research soon. I asked, "Into what?" "[Redacted.] Typically liberal bullshit," he replied self-depricatingly. Then he corrects himself: "*typical" But ...
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1answer
622 views

How to use “instead” at end of sentence

I'm not sure if there should be a comma after 'said' in this situation. I'm picky about punctuation and want to discover what is acceptable. Can't find any similar questions/answers. - Which (maybe ...
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1answer
89 views

What part of speech is “back” in “If you want it back”?

If you want it back ... I'm doing a school project and need to figure out parts of speech in my letter that I wrote, but, I dont know what "back" is, can anyone help?
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1answer
27 views

Is “well” an adjective?

I read a Cambridge advanced grammar in use and there's one line says We can use sufficiently before adjectives to express a similar meaning to enough. Sufficiently is often preferred in more formal ...
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1answer
44 views

'Every two' as synonymous with 'every other'

In the sentence "a copy for every two people", i.e. 'to share", would every two be synomymous with every other, where the latter would be used in the same sense as it is used in "I used to visit her ...
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2answers
65 views

Usage of “ever” [closed]

Which one is correct: This is one of our favorite ever holidays! or This is one of our favorite holidays ever! Thanks a lot.
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1answer
162 views

“leave immediately, sooner if possible”

In the series Shameless.US, S06E10, an actress utters "leave immediately, sooner if possible". Is this idiomatic? I'd like to know why sooner refers to.
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1answer
35 views

“in favor” used adverbially

I'd like to know whether the phrase "in favor" can be used adverbially, e.g. They all voted in favor.