Questions tagged [adverbs]

An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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35 views

Is 'with' a preposition or an adverb? [closed]

I am a bit confused if with is a preposition or an adverb.https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=2ahUKEwih2NX-...
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“Since” vs “that”

"Tomorrow will be 3 weeks that I have been working on this project" (means a continuous process that hasn't ended yet) Tomorrow will be 3 weeks since I have started working on this project (...
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Is ill-qualified even a term?

I know the words unqualified, disqualified. But is the term 'ill-qualified' right grammatically? In some articles I have seen that they used it to say people who are not competent enough and in some ...
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Can we use adverbs with Comparative adjectives?

He is much taller than me. Vs He is incredibly taller than me. Can we use incredibly here, with a comparative adjective(taller) ?
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Time adverbial ambiguity

I have booked a flight in September. In the above sentence, does it mean the flight is in September or the action of booking is in September? In May, I have booked a flight back to home in September....
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“a couple”: adverbial phrase

Page 229 of Garner's fourth edition reads When couple is used with comparison words such as more, fewer, and too many, the of is omitted <have a couple more shrimp>. In the predicate of the ...
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“Good going” or “well going”?

The colloquialism "good going!", said as a praise, uses the adjective "good" in reference to the verb "going". Shouldn't the adverb "well" be used instead? Why ...
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“Almost none” + plural verb

When none is modified by almost it is difficult to avoid treating the word as a plural: Almost none of the officials were interviewed by the committee. https://ahdictionary.com/word/search.html?q=none ...
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gardenersplanet vs gardenerplanet, which one to choose [closed]

I have a domain name called gardenerplanet but when i look at other websites that start with gardener the word is always used in plural from for example: gardenersworld.com, gardenersedge.com, ...
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“Such” as a part of speech, and similar words

The word "such" seems to fit under a few different categories. It could be arguably classified as: A noun - "The movie would only be of interest to such as enjoy mindless explosions ...
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Usage of transition words

Consider the following portion from a drug's website: Bamocaftor potassium is a CFTR channel (DeltaF508-CFTR Mutant) corrector in phase II clinical trials at Vertex, in patients with CF who are ...
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Adverb “Really” + could + present perfect

My question is about the adverb placement "really" when combined with "could" and the present perfect in a sentence. Below are four possibilities. I really could have made more ...
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What is a(n) conjunction/phrase/adverb that means the same as “if we ignore X, … (the rest is good)” in writings?

Example: "If we overlook the fact that the game lacks purpose, I think it's safe to say it's an amazing pastime." I think "apart from" could be misunderstood and perceived as "...
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Past perfect continuous and use of since

I came across the following sentence with an instruction to rewrite it in past perfect continuous using the given time expression in brackets: Govind was working in this factory as a watchman. (since ...
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Adverb confusion!

I was a bit confused on the use of "below" as an adverb, and it's called into question my entire understanding of the use of adverbs. As an example of "below" as an adverb, Webster'...
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A question concerning use of simple past and present perfect tense

Do you think you saw me somewhere before Or Do you think you have seen me somewhere before In my grammar books it says that the Present Perfect is never used with adverbs of past time. In such cases ...
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Cambridge IELTS 10 example essay. Adj or Adv after a verb?

Here is a sentence from the example essay of Cambridge IELTS 10, Test 1: "This kind but firm approach will achieve more than harsh punishment, which might entail many negative consequences ...
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Can I say “faster, smarter, and together”? [closed]

Do these three adverbs work as a list? I'm wondering if this combination is grammatical. This is the sentence: Join this group of developers to collaborate on how to build apps faster, smarter, and ...
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Gerund after as though, please, help to clarify

They looked at Mary in surprise as though... her story. A) not believing B) not having believed C) not believed D) believed
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Is “pull forwards to the yellow line” or “pull forward to the yellow line” grammatically correct? [duplicate]

I am not sure whether forward or forwards is to be used in this sentence.
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57 views

May somebody explain this expression about “though” for me?

He wasn't there long, though, because his mother passed away just four years later. May somebody explain why there is a "though" for me? Is it different if I don't use "though" in ...
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Nouns modified by adverbs?

I am curious to find out information about the semantics of ungrammatical phrases like "Suddenly Susan" (a film title) or "Purely Pickles" (a food brand), where an adverb modifies ...
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Interjecting adverbs between indirect and direct objects in ditransitive verb phrases?

I'm currently writing a paper about a syntactic issue in English and I was curious how these sounded to everyone. Sam put carefully the coffee on the desk. Sam put the coffee carefully on the desk. ...
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Inarguably vs Unarguably

I was typing inarguably, but my spell checker complained and corrected it to unarguably. It's probably not the best spell checker, because I thought "inarguably" unarguably exists. I tried to Google ...
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The adverb “why” at the end of a phrase

I found the following phrase in the wild and as an ESL speaker it piqued my interest: So people who become Social Media influencers can get lucrative deals with companies why? What's up with the ...
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Adverbs in comparative clauses

I saw an anecdotal "rule" in a magazine stating that, if an adverb is used in a comparative clause, the '-ly' form of the adverb is preferable to a comparative form. Apparently however, if the adverb ...
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Make sure you invite Jill herself(,) <too> [The syntactic function of 'too' and usage of comma]

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (Pages 438-9) has this: An NP may contain more than one peripheral modifier, with multiple layers of embedding: [8] i Make sure you invite [Jill herself ...
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Is using “rather” and “instead” in the same sentence tautology?

I was in the process of writing an email to my university project supervisor about several meetings we need to schedule for the upcoming weeks. I wanted to ask him if one meeting is sufficient, or if ...
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Why are adverbs included in the form class? Do they change forms?

The word 'green' being an adjective has other forms such as greener and greenest. The form of the word changes and therefore it belongs to the form class. Could anyone give the explanation for the ...
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“Even the dog refused to eat it” - As even is an adverb here, what exactly is it modifying?

Silly question but trying to improve my grammar. Even the dog refused to eat it. I am not sure how to express what "even" is modifying. I know that the context is equivalent to surprisingly but ...
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Using 'twice' vs. 'double' vs. 'two times' and 'triple' vs. 'three times' vs. 'thrice' (also adverb vs. adjective)

I'm wondering in which contexts which of 'twice', 'double' or 'two times' is preferred. Why? The same question applies to 'triple', 'three times' or 'thrice', where the latter is obviously dying. I ...
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What term describes a situation where conventional rules of grammar are unable to produce an idiomatically formed word for a particular context?

I recently saw the question Is the spelling beautifuly correct? at ELL. Before I even looked at it, I had thought of a joking response: ✘ No, it's ugly incorrect. But I quickly stopped myself, ...
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Contemporary synonym of “thereanent” or “thereabout”

I want to express that one thing concerns another, using an adverb, such as in: I mended the sink and wrote her a note thereanent / thereabout. Meaning: I mended the sink and wrote her a note ...
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What is the correct way to punctuate this text?

I would like to know your thoughts on how to correctly punctuate this text: One of the most visited places here in Manila is Binondo, often referred to as the business capital at the time, before ...
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Hyphenation of frequency-dependently

If, for example, a sound or signal is amplified depending on its frequency, would it be rather correct to write a frequency-dependently amplified tone, a frequency-dependently-amplified tone, or a ...
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How to make the request stronger using “Please”

I understand, we can use the word “please” before, middle and after the sentence. Would like to know just by changing position of word “please” in any sentence, How to make a strong request? ...
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Is “very” an adjective? [duplicate]

We all know that there is a sentence "He is a very man". In this sentence I suppose that "very" refers to "man":noun. So in this case, very should be treated as an adjective, isn't it?
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The dress was too small in the shoulders

The dress was too small in the shoulders. Why in this sentence does the adverbial phrase (in the shoulder) modify the adjective (small), and not the verb (was)? What can I read for a clear answer to ...
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She is more than a friend. [parse]

She is more than a friend. As I understand, "more than a friend" is a constituent. The dependent "than a friend" is a prepositional phrase. The head "more" is a pronoun. Am I right? Thanks!
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How to analyze 'last night' and 'last/next week'?

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (Page 429) says: Yesterday, today, tonight, and tomorrow are not traditionally analysed as pronouns, but belong in this subclass of nouns by virtue of ...
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Relative pronoun vs. relative adverb [duplicate]

[1] "That picture was taken in the park where I used to play." (Here, 'where' is an relative adverb. [2] "I remember the day when we first met." (Here, 'when' is an relative adverb.) ...
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When to use 'would' properly in a novel

I am a little confused about the usage of 'would' in fiction-writing/translation. So, here's a very simple example that confuses me. "Why did you say that?" she asked. -- (my version) "Why would ...
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What is the adverb form of “custom”?

What is the adverb form of the adjective "custom"? custom adjective made specially for individual customers. dealing in things so made, or doing work to order. The adverb form of the noun "custom" ...
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Adverb or Relative clause

Is "by the time"a subordinate conjunction used to introduce Adverb time clause as mentioned at few sites. Ex-I reached there by the time he started. I feel the clause following "time"has "when/that"...
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Is it grammatically correct to say ( can I kindly bring your attention to … )?

Is it grammatically correct the position of the adverb in the following question ( can I kindly bring your attention to .... ) ?
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Position of Adverb of manner before or after preposition

I will tell a story slowly to you. I will tell a story to you slowly. Which one of the above sentences is correct.
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Collocate with adjectives

Recently I have learnt stronger adverbs( absolutely, completely, totally) never collocate with non-extreme adjectives. So how do we know whether we can use "stronger adverbs" with a adj or not? Should ...
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139 views

Good practise or good practice? [duplicate]

I believe the noun is practice and the verb is practise, as demonstrated in; The doctor with a private practice practises privately However, if I wanted to say: It is good practi(s/c)e to ...
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mostly / mainly - adverb with a noun? [duplicate]

a penny for your thoughts! I always learnt that adverbs can only come before (i.e. premodify) adjectives and verbs, e.g. adj: I am extremely happy v: I really enjoy football But I was thinking... ...
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62 views

Previous vs Previously

Looking for correct usage here: ...show previous visited locations ...show previously visited locations previous is an adjective, previously is an adverb but is visited the verb being described? ...

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