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An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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Correct adverb usage? Or…?

"Communities, healthy in the past, are now left with depravity and helplessness." "Formerly healthy communities are now left with depravity and helplessness." Which sentence is grammatically correct?...
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Is there an adverb that means “according to my knowledge” or “if I remember correctly”?

I find it useful to give such a disclaimer when stating something from memory or personal knowledge but which I would not guarantee to be correct. However, saying, e.g., "according to my knowledge" ...
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11 views

What is the best possible way of usingof adverbs [closed]

pls let me know the most suitable answers for this passage. Use adverbs from the list to complete the passage. (very , almost , enough , extremely , hardly , just) Joanna was drawing a peacock ...
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27 views

Confusion of comparative adjective and/or adverb in a sentence [migrated]

An adjective is that which tells something about a noun or a pronoun. And an adverb is that which describes a verb. However, I find sentences where an adjective is used to describe a verb as follows: ...
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2answers
82 views

replacing adverbs

I am trying to rewrite the sentence below to replace the adverb 'far' (simply because I want to have as few adverbs as possible in my manuscript): Specifically, their approach adds rejected ...
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3answers
82 views

adverbs after linking verbs

They write we must use adjectives rather than adverbs after linking verbs. For example https://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/british/taste_2: Food can taste sweet like sugar. But here's ...
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3answers
65 views

Is this an independent or dependent clause?

Look at the following example 'But she was so tired, she did not finish painting.' Is the first clause an independent or dependent clause? If it is an independent clause, should I remove the comma ...
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1answer
55 views

How to use “same” as an adverb?

I have the following sentence: An uncommitted player reacts to different alliance types the same. I may as well say “...in the same way” but want to keep it short if possible. Is this a correct ...
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9 views

It became clear to me [migrated]

Why, if clear describes the way in which "it" became more obvious, so we use an adjective (clear) instead of an adverb (clearly)?
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6answers
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A situation when two or more people speak at the same time

The word or phrase I am looking for is quite opposite to that of the situation when people, such as students or sports players, sing their national anthem with the same tone and words. I want a ...
2
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2answers
56 views

Is it wrong to use these adverbs 'a bit, a little, too' with adjectives 'good, nice, cheap, clean, new, comfortable.'

I was looking through an English book and came across a rule that has confused me; I dont remember reading it anywhere before(but I am not that well read anyway); Don't use these adverbs(a bit, a ...
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23 views

Can you say “I'll ride my bike there”?

Just wondering if it is correct to say: "I'll ride my bike there" when I am trying to say I'll take my bike to go to some place. Thanks!
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36 views

Can there be a comma between the adverb and the noun of the last member of a series?

I saw a practice SAT question on Khan Academy: Certified Executive Chef Hilary DeMane has prepared confections for celebrities, governors, and even Ronald Reagan. The correct answer is filled in ...
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2answers
86 views

Is “deacceleratingly” a valid word?

Deaccelerate means the same as decelerate, though it seems to be a much less common alternative. I did not know this until recently, as I had used this alternative all my life. It just seemed logical ...
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0answers
15 views

Independent clause connecting an adverb and list

Help! In my role, I collaborated with casting agencies and managers, often manning the desk, taking calls and ensuring transparency on all sides. ~should I include a comma after 'managers' or omit ...
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2answers
56 views

What's the adverb version of “pleased”

I want to say "she had a pleased smile on her face" but in the form of "she smiled pleased(-ly?)". I just can't seem to find the right word. It's driving me nuts.
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2answers
41 views

Adverb versus Adjective in -minded people

I am currently running for the Board of Education in my little town and am working on my candidate statement for the election handbook that the Department of Elections produces. I sent what I had to ...
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0answers
29 views

Difference between Adverb of reason vs Illative Conjunction

Can you please tell the difference between adverb of reason and illative Conjunction? I am confused whether it is Adverb of reason or illative Conjunction in below sentence I was not well so I ...
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1answer
55 views

Do you put a comma around “as well”

Would I write, "He, as well, no longer held the need to impress her" or "He as well no longer held the need to impress her"? Which is grammatically correct?
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1answer
24 views

Two adverbs, and an indefinite article

I found two adverbs, between which indefinite article, in TVTRopes site: Upon reading it, the host concludes that it's actually a really old joke that everyone knows. Is it grammatical to ...
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2answers
57 views

What is the grammatical name for these words? [closed]

What is the grammatical category of the following words called: perhaps, therefore, hence, nevertheless, etc.?
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1answer
38 views

Using of adverbs very and really before an adjective

He was really frightened. It seemed to him as his nightmare came true. He was very frightened. It seemed to him as his nightmare came true. What is the difference between these two sentences in ...
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1answer
41 views

There was vs. was

Recently, a native English speaker (I'm not) suggested I'd improve a sentence of mine by removing a superfluous there: Against the wall there was a yellow bicycle. This made me think: is there any ...
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1answer
44 views

Usage of “about” as a preposition and adverb [closed]

I got the following examples, but couldn't identify, whether these are adverbs or prepositions? He is always talking about how clever his children are. I wish you'd stop making jokes about my ...
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1answer
70 views

Past modals and the passive: which one is correct?

Considering easily as an attitude or manner adverb, which of the following is correct? He could easily have been killed. or He could have been easily killed.
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1answer
46 views

Does the word “unnoticed” act as an adverb or an adjective in the phrase “go unnoticed”?

In the sentence Steve went unnoticed by the crowd. Does unnoticed modify went, making it an adverb or Steve, making it an adjective?
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1answer
51 views

What is the preferable wording for that situation?

During my vacation, I have worked on a scientific project. Now, I would like to add this project to my resume. So, I have added the following to my resume. 1- Volunteer scientific work: ...
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2answers
39 views

Where should I put the adverb “always” in these narrations?

Look at these two statements involving indirect (reported) speech: He advised me to speak the truth always. or He advised me to always speak the truth. Here, I am confused about setting the ...
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1answer
25 views

Comma rules for sentence adverb placed in the middle of the sentence

Why writer has not used comma before or to join these two independent clauses. "Had anyone actually told her that or had she merely assumed it?"
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1answer
68 views

Usage and order of “galore”: an adjective, but looks like an adverb

It is common to put adverbs of manner after a direct object. But is it grammatically correct to put an adjective after noun? As in: Since then there have been reports, inquiries and guidance galore. ...
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1answer
88 views

Is there any etymological relation between “a-hunting” and “ajar”?

While reading this question I recalled hearing the phrase like to go a-hunting on several occasions when someone stylized their speech to sound old-time'y and now I started wondering if there is any ...
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1answer
26 views

Back and forth. Navigate back, forth

I am aware of the following expression Back and forth Basically that means to move in one direction and in the opposite one. I wonder, whether is it possible to say the following This button can ...
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0answers
14 views

Placing the principal verb at end with adverb

Is it right grammatically , "The queen dressed in beautiful looking golden gown stunningly entered." ?? I think it is right, but I don't know why it sounds wrong..
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1answer
23 views

From before, from aforementioned

Can before and aforementioned be used in a similar way to above? Context: Say I'm writing a report, and would like to reference an earlier bit. If that earlier bit is in close proximity or follows ...
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1answer
43 views

Can a preposition be before an adverb?

Ok, this site says The preposition is almost always before the noun or pronoun and that is why it is called a preposition Now, this oxford dictionary says here (adverb) used after a ...
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1answer
227 views

A word for 'closing eyes'

So I'm writing a narrative and my character has to close her eyes. However, the word 'close' seems to just give off the visual that she is gently/lightly closing her eyes. I want to do the opposite of ...
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3answers
56 views

Adverb form of “outlier”

I'm looking for an adverb form or synonym of the word "outlier." An example of usage: This datapoint is _____ positive. I've thought of disproportionately, but that word carries additional ...
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1answer
50 views

Using 'caveat' as adverb to introduce a sentence

I would like to use caveat to introduce a sentence where I specify important information. For example: You can wash mostly anything in this washing machine. Caveat, if you wash wool set the ...
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1answer
152 views

What part of speech is 'better' in the following sentence?

What part of speech is better in the following sentence? Is it an adverb because it modifies the verb expect? Is it an abstract noun because it is an “intangible concept such as an emotion, a feeling, ...
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3answers
170 views

Can a noun be an adverb? [duplicate]

This question, which I first posed on the ELL site a few weeks ago, remains effectively unanswered. Although there an answer did finally get posted, it seemed to be more of a parody of an answer than ...
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1answer
68 views

Any meaning differences if grammatical structure of these two phrases were changed?

A: Don’t leave your belongings unattended B: Don’t take it personally I’m really getting confused of a grammatical structure of these two phases. Their whole structures seem alike, but the part ...
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1answer
135 views

“commonly known as” or “known commonly as”?

I'm editing a scientific paper, and one of my colleague wrote: "...in applications known commonly as 'displays',..." Personally, I would change it to "commonly known", but I didn't find any formal ...
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1answer
34 views

Usage of the word Just

We were talking in a group about two components of my Salary one Offshore and another Onsite. There I said Last year I just got the Offshore Hike and not the onsite hike. Now I want to know if ...
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1answer
88 views

The match now starts next Monday

I cannot find an appropriate paraphrase for the next sentence, from Cambridge Grammar of the English Language, pag. 133. The match now starts next Monday, not Tuesday, as I said in my last letter. ...
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1answer
75 views

Use of past participles

Past participles are used as adjective in English language. But I have found a sentence on the internet. As She was looking at me shocked. I do not know whether this sentence is right or wrong. ...
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1answer
29 views

use of Article in Sentences [duplicate]

The school provides services of art teacher. or School provides the services of art teacher. which one is correct
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42 views

Words ending in -ABLY

I'm an advanced Scrabble player and I have this question about the English language: How come a word like "Lovably" is a word (loveably is also acceptable in Scrabble, even though it gets the red ...
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1answer
43 views

Why is the “up” in “sign-up” related to “creating a new account” but “in” in “sign-in” refers to a existing one? [closed]

What is the difference between in and up that causes the meaning of sign to change? Research: etymonline's entries for sign-in and sign-up don't help much.
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0answers
19 views

What is the relation between a verb and an adverb (officially) called?

What does an adverb "do" to a verb? When googling I found terms like modifies or describes, but I'm not sure if a name for the relation exists.
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1answer
47 views

A word or expression less cutting than “obviously” for “in a self explanatory manner”

In a sentence of this kind, in a programming environment: This construct is "in a self explanatory manner" not interpretable, since it raises an ambiguity over the language´s syntax which is not ...