Questions tagged [adverbs]

An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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What is the usage of "considerably" outside of comparative constructs?

I have noticed that all the examples for "considerably" in Lexico (which is based on the OED, I believe?) are comparatives: considerably [adverb]: By a notably large amount or to a notably ...
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Is there a term for "adverb verb"s and/or "redundant adverb verb"s?

This is a meta question of this one: How can I omit adverbs to impart a strong feeling? Like the original question, I'm trying to find some tool/list/book that helps one convert "adverb verb"...
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What could possibly cause the stress shift in adverbs ending in -arily compared to adjectives ending in -ary?

While adjectives ending in -ary (British English /əri/, American English /eri/) never have stress on the second last syllable (the /e/ in AmE, and obviously the /ə/ in BrE), their derivative adverbs ...
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Possible to tell the difference between the comparative adjective and the adverbial phrase here?

This sentence is from an interview I am proofreading: I sometimes believe that a person outside of me can see my aesthetic easier than I can see my own. My first instinct was of course to suggest ...
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"So" vs. "Very" when making a comparison

I understand that "so" and "very" are similar in meaning, with "so" perhaps being a little stronger: "I'm very happy today." "I'm so happy today." I ...
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Audio version of "Vision"

If 'vision' is the detection of visual information, is there another similar word for the detection of audio..? Obviously 'hearing', although that just doesn't seem appropriate. 'Auditory sensation' ...
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In the pattern "I am also <adjective>," does "also" modify the verb "am" or the adjective?

My family and I saw the following phrase: The also relevant part is . . . We all agreed that it was kind of an awkward sounding construction. But we disagreed on whether it was grammatically correct....
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Should "each" always be paired with a singular verb, even when a 'singular noun' and [each + partitive] are paired?

I know that normally singular verbs are to be used with "each", but what if an individual and 'each' + a partitive involving a collective noun, such as "family", is spoken of, and &...
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-1 votes
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Adverb placements

I came across this sentence and had a hard time understanding it because of the adverb placement. I thought adverbs or adverb phrases usually come right after the verb when "be" is the main ...
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What is the word for extra, unneeded descriptive words describing something in a sentence? [duplicate]

What’s the term for extra, synonymous unneeded adjectives describing a noun or verb in a sentence?
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Is [the act of something] considered a verb or a noun?

For example, take "Teaching people can be difficult" Is "teaching people" (the act of teaching people) a noun phrase and "be difficult" the verb phrase, as in being ...
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Using respectively to define parameters in a math equation: Singluar or plural verb? [duplicate]

There are a lot of questions/discussions about using singular or plural verbs with respectively, and the answer is always a singular verb. Does using a singular verb also apply while defining the ...
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Prepostition 'as to' in poetry

So I ran accross this line in a poem of Alexander Pope: Vice is a monster of so frightful mien As to be hated needs but to be seen; Yet seen too oft, familiar with her face, We first endure, then ...
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An adjective or adverb meaning patterned (really or apparently) in fragments of a material that could also be used unbroken, e.g. stone

My question is best illustrated with an image: What is a good adjective or adverb to describe that kind of pattern, which brings out that normally or perhaps ideally you would have a solid piece of ...
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Is the term “in persons’ grammatically correct [closed]

I heard the following line from the Rick and Morty TV series: Forgive me for doing this in notes; I'm not strong enough to do it in persons. Is it grammatically correct to use in persons instead of ...
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Does the word "besides" have two senses belonging to one semantic field?

The term "besides" can mean "apart from"; "other than"; "I have no friends besides Maria." "I have nothing besides a car." "in addition (to)&...
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Suffix in adverbs: The use of the term 'normally distributed' in place of 'normal distributed'

When a word is used as an adverb then it is normally combined with a suffix like "-ly" or "-ian". Like 'normal' becomes 'normally' and the previous sentence is an example of its ...
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Is "falcon" an adverb in the phrase "Falcon...PUNCH!"? [closed]

This is from Super Smash Bros: https://supersmashbros.fandom.com/wiki/Falcon_Punch. We had a discussion at work. Some people think "falcon" is the adverb to "punch". Some people ...
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Are there rules or style considerations to the ordering of adverbs as modifiers to verbs and adjectives? [duplicate]

When modifying a verb with an adverb, I noticed that you can swap the order in most cases without any loss of meaning. For instance: She ran quickly versus She quickly ran Is there any reason to ...
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Adverbs of manner modifying adjectives

I’m confused on adverbs of manner because it seems like some can modify adjectives while other cannot. Why is this? The book was beautifully profound. The book was quickly profound. The first ...
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Inversion of adverb/adjective and preposition

Is one of the following two sentences incorrect ? "I didn't get good enough a glimpse" (1) and "I didn't get a good enough glimpse" (2) In my native language, the latter seems more ...
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Question on 'especially'

See below a sentence containing an adverbial phrase headed by 'especially'. It was very difficult for boats, especially large boats, to cross the river. I am aware that the adjunct containing '...
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1 answer
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How should I interpret "nearly" in this sentence? [closed]

Several stories in major news organizations (Washington Post, NPR, NY Times) today used an interesting construction in describing the alarming increase in Omicron infections: "Omicron positives ...
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1 answer
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'focus fully on' or 'fully focus on' [closed]

A student wrote '(I) focused fully on cycling'. I am quite certain about 'I fully focused on' but I think his phrasing was grammatically correct too.
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1 answer
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Can "rightly" be used as an adjective? [closed]

I am writing an essay for school and I would like to hear opinions on the matter. The context is, "...we can therefore infer that stereotypes are seen by the general consensus in a negative light....
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1 answer
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When can "that" be replaced with an -ing form?

Is there a general rule that allows to replace "noun + that + verb" with "noun + ing-form of verb"? Consider this sentence: Metal physical properties are key traits that determine ...
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1 answer
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Can we use "however" and "on the other hand" together?

Some say no, explaining that any one word is redundant. Some say yes, like me, because I think they have different meanings. For example: On her left hand she wore no jewellery. On the other hand, ...
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Combining "most" and "second most" [closed]

I want to write the following sentence. But it sounds a bit weird for me as a non-native speaker. English was the most or second most used language in 100 groups. Is it correct? Thanks!
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Is there a difference between the adverbs “Melancholily” and “Melancholically”?

Melancholia is an old and quite beautiful word which describes a depressed state. It was used as a noun in the same way that “depression” is currently used - and in the medical field was a diagnosis ...
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-1 votes
1 answer
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How can "How do you play guitar often?" be rephrased? [closed]

How can "How do you play guitar often?" be rephrased, and which is the likeliest interpretation: "In what way do you often play guitar?" "How do you manage to play guitar (so)...
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What's the difference between "really have had" and "have really had"?

In a sentence, what's the difference between "he must really have had a rough day" and "he must have really had a rough day"?
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Omitting "to be", "that", "it is" all in the same sentence?

I encountered the following in a 1958 book on investing: How has the market price of these shares responded to all this? Has the price-earning ratio continued to advance as, twenty-two months ago, I ...
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Adverb phrase or prepositional phrase? [duplicate]

If I have the following sentence: "In mid-August, Gignac flew with Soffer on his private jet to Aspen to discuss the hotel purchase." Focusing in on the "In mid-August," part in ...
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-2 votes
1 answer
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use of "said fiercely"

'How can you stand this? he asked Hermione fiercely. 'Just standing here and watching it happen?' He hesitated. 'I'm going to grab the Cloak!' Context: Harry and Hermione have gone back in time. ...
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Across (covering all area/part of)

Harry moved his head over on the pillow. In the bed to his right lay Hermione. Moonlight was falling across her bed. My research : According to various dictionaries, the defintion of "across&...
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5 votes
2 answers
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Why are 'at least' and 'a lot' not single words?

I constantly have trouble with spelling the word-phrases ‘at least’ and ‘a lot’ .. they both should be a single word in my mind, which isn’t correct. They both seem to just be a single unit of meaning....
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Speak low/lowly

Speak very low. Speak very lowly. Research: Low can, according to Oxford dictionary, mean low sound, low in height, or maybe "low in importance". Lowly, according to Oxford dictionary, ...
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0 votes
2 answers
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Is this a correct way to use the word "however"? [closed]

We apologize; however, we are unable to process your request. I'm sure however is not the correct word to use here. I feel like a causal conjunction might be better. I'm still trying to understand ...
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1 vote
3 answers
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What does the adverb as modify in this sentence?

“The man is as tired as a sloth.” In this sentence, I know the first “as” modifies tired, but what does the second one modify?
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Preposition or Adverb?

There are a couple of places where I get confused on whether a word is an adverb or a preposition (or maybe even both?). For example, a sentence I am confused by is "Don't throw out the water ...
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Negotiable [for|at|to] a reasonable rate

I was writing an email earlier and got totally stuck on the correct adverb. What I'm trying to say is "this guy is usually expensive, might he be negotiable / cheaper" "I realise he’s a ...
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1 vote
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How to clarify whether an adverb at the end of serial list modifies each item vs just the last item?

In the recreational community where my family has property, the common understanding has always been that no rentals are allowed, period. Not everyone agrees. This is the policy as it was written in ...
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"As soon as" vs. "no sooner"

As soon as they had arrived they were arguing. They had no sooner arrived than they were arguing. No sooner had they arrived than they were arguing. Can all three sentences be used interchangeably? I ...
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Adverb in a prepositional phrase and what it modifies

I am with arguably the best basketball player in the nation. Would this sentence above be correct, and if so, what does “arguably” modify?
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Comma Between Adverbs [closed]

Is a comma needed between the adverbs in the following sentence? I can smell her obviously newly ironed hair.
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Why are the articles "an" and "the" not allowed in this structure? "(The/An) X though Y was..."

(*An) astute businessman though he was, P was capable of extreme recklessness (*The) actual perpetrators though they were, the criminals never admitted their guilt in court Why are the articles not ...
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how can an adjective function as an adverb

Yet because the immediate effect of the medicine is to make the patient feel rapidly better and she is not told what might happen later,she goes home happy. In the last half of this sentence ,the “...
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"neither" as adverb leading sentence [duplicate]

Is it an accepted form to begin a sentence with the word "neither" used as an adverb? Many grammar sources discuss sentences beginning with "neither", but only in the context of ...
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"Fairly" can't be used with comparatives or negatives

Don't use ‘fairly’ in front of a comparative form, *the train is fairly quicker than the bus; in more formal writing, you use rather or somewhat. https://www.wordreference.com/EnglishUsage/fairly ...
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Can adverb phrases adjoin with a clause?

I recently read the following sentence that consists a part, which is bolded, is beginning with an adverb and adjoin with a clause. I'm confused whether it is adverb phrases, as this website https://...
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