Questions tagged [adverbs]

An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, preposition, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of place, time, circumstance, causality, manner, or degree.

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38 views

“but” followed by adverb

Is the usage "but implicitly" in the following sentence correct? B is also assumed but implicitly. The context is as follows. We know that both "A" and "B" are assumed. But compared with "A", the ...
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The usage of commas with the word “additionally”

Good time of the day. I just want to clarify something with your help. Can you please tell me should one opt to insert a comma before and after the word "additionally" in this instance? "Referring ...
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AGO for physical distance?

I have come up with this sentence "I crossed the border 3 kilometers ago". I feel like ago is not the correct adverb since it's used in time contexts. Can you help me find the correct adverb? Thank ...
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What is the best : separately ot individually? [closed]

I have a doubt in this sentence: In Appendix 1 can be found results of computation for each case:A,B,C and D separately // individually
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95 views

Trying to undertand if a noun an be an adverb given the struture of a sentence [migrated]

I'm trying to teach my 7 year old daughter English and am clearly failing given I'm asking a question here. The following sentence has me a little baffled in regards to the noun, verb and adverb. ...
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Adverb clause or noun clause [closed]

Is the following clause is an adverb clause modifying to know or is it a noun clause . And if it is a noun clause does it act as an appositive or as an object of prepositions. Also, can I consider "...
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79 views

Funnily enough or Funny enough

How to say this correctly? In the first sentence I want it to be the way he said it, describing a verb, and in the second one I want to make it the way he is, describing a noun. And what part of ...
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54 views

“to be more precise” vs. “to be more precisely”

While proofreading the thesis of a colleague, I came across the phrase "to be more precisely" and corrected it to "to be more precise". I'm pretty sure that my correction is correct but I have trouble ...
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56 views

Can you help me identify the adverb? [duplicate]

The railway station is far away. Where is the adverb here, and what does it modify? My answer was "away", but I am not quite sure if it's correct. I am also confused by I would rather wait as ...
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What word to say “should not happened” paired with 'expenses' - bad in nature but unavoidable and not rude

Is there suitable word when paired with 'expenses' to mean "should not have happened"? I want to say there were some bad expenses that should not happened but were unavoidable. At the same time not ...
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87 views

What is the function of “west” in this sentence?

Little House on the Prairie contains the following sentence: "Santa Claus had the longest, thickest, whitest set of whiskers west of the Mississippi." Is "west" acting as an adverb that modifies "...
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What part of speech is this “clean” word in the sentence?

To start off with, let me come clean, the Java logging ecosystem is messy. This sentence is quoted from Setting up logging second paragraph. Is the word clean an adverb? Or come is a transitive verb?...
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“not” is an adverb with special positioning (like “do solemnly swear”)— are there others? Is there a name for this positioning?

Adverbs allow for a range of positions, but focusing how a adverb might be positioned relative to a verb phrase, "always" allows (But is not limited to): For single verb phrases, "always" can go ...
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the adverb “all” as a direct object

merriam-webster.com: 1. I forgot all about paying the bill. collinsdictionary.com: 2. He loves animals and he knows all about them. As written in the dictionaries, "all" is an adverb ...
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Adverb-preposition placement: “consists exclusively of” vs. “consists of exclusively”

Building on the question here, I am trying to better understand the difference in use and meaning implied by the change of the adverb position against the preposition in the following sentence: (1)...
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other vs otherS for plural

So I know this might seem obvious, but I just noticed it and I got completely unsure about it. I'm writing a computer program where I have to say [The tournament is played] at Course X +3 others ...
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1answer
38 views

What we call a dictionary that link positional synonymous words? Is there one already?

I found a dictionary that list words with the same root meaning but different in position, either as subject or object or even predicate, useful. As an example, when we look for the word "eat", it ...
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Identifying adverbs

Indentify the adverb in the following sentences and name it's kind Many ancient coins and potteries are kept in the museum. There are seven days in a week. These shoes are old. There was little water ...
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Word choice for describing people

Is there a word or phrase in English that describes people who always prioritise self-interest over other matters, have a weak sense of responsibility, and are inclined to find excuses? For example, ...
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'there' adverb,pronoun or preposition? [duplicate]

He was there. In this sentence is ' there ' an adverb? I get very confused when I have to identify parts of speech. Any help would be appreciated.
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2answers
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Deceptively attractive

If I mention that someone is not good looking once you see them up close, does that make them “deceptively attractive” or “deceptively unattractive?” My friend and I are having a discussion about ...
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79 views

Why is the adjective “below” rare compared to adjective “above”?

Above and below can be used as both an adverb and an adjective to indicate an earlier or a later part of a piece of writing respectively. However, adjective below is rare compared to adjective above (...
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67 views

Which modifies which

He took his son back to school. Does to school modifies back or the other way around?
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What part of speech is *almost* in this sentence - *These tiny flowers transform into pulp-filled pods almost the size of rugby balls.*

Now, before I get jumped on because almost is always an adverb, please allow me to explain. If almost is an adverb, which it most definitely is (I checked several dictionaries and it is only listed ...
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1answer
60 views

Is there a single adverb meaning 'in common'?

The adverb commonly in the sense of 'in common' is now obsolete as shown in this wikitionary: as a rule; frequently; usually (obsolete) in common; familiarly Is there a single adverb ...
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call on - trans or intransitive verb

Merriam-Webster gives: call - intransitive verb: to make a brief visit called on a friend Whereas Macmillan has: call on - transitive verb [call on someone] to visit someone, usually for a ...
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Repeating adjectives and adverbs after conjuctions

Do adjectives or adverbs associate with the second noun or adjective after the first one or do they need to be repeated? This dichotomy can at times be too inclusive or (too) exclusive? Does the ...
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1answer
105 views

Not not round enough balls to alter the data

In the following sentence, are the "not's" found in the proper place with correct grammar? If not, what's the best way to format this sentence? The balls were not, not round enough to alter the ...
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3answers
402 views

“Out” after “to be”: adverb, not adjective?

"Out" is listed as an adverb in the Cambridge Dictionary in the following example. I came around to see you this morning, but you were out. Does anyone know why it isn't an adjective?
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Speculations and deductions

I am very curious to know if: “ She probably should have had the cake" is grammatically correct.In other words Iam in doubt whether we can use adverbs of certainty, like probably, along with ...
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215 views

It sounds well or it sounds good? [duplicate]

Is it possible and correct to use "well" with "to sound"? I am under the impression that most natives find it wrong. For example: 1 The guitar sounds good. - OK 2 The guitar sounds well. - Possible? ...
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608 views

“I sure am” or “I surely am”

Imagine somebody asks to confirm your identity; "Are you Mr./Ms. X?" Do you reply with "I sure am!" or "I surely am!"? I'm struggling to know whether to apply the adverb form here. What's the rule ...
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Small and large adverbs

On the mathematics stackexchange site, I wrote: If you are certain that those earlier in the order will collectively reach a correct decision then you weight your vote so small that you do not ...
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“Even more worth reading” v “worth reading even more”

A Meta.SE post was recently edited (by an ELU member I respect), with the reason "grammar": Before: resigned: Aza on Literature, worth reading, predates other events; later wrote an update ...
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1answer
77 views

A small sliver of moon rock

In the following sentences, does 'small' function as an adverb or an adjective? Visitors will be astounded at the amazing exhibits; one of these is a small sliver of moon rock that visitors are ...
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3answers
61 views

Adverb for particular kind of smile

Similar to this question, I'm looking for a word to describe a particular kind of smile. It's the kind of smile I smile when I receive a sweet message from the girl I love, and just can't help ...
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Order of several adverbs of the same type [duplicate]

Today I started an English course with a new teacher. After being asked to arrange words into a proper sentence, she pointed me out on being wrong on something: I said "tomorrow at six", and she said ...
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act weird/weirdly vs. act strange/strangely

According to this ngram, 'act weird' is much more productive than 'act weirdly', which is almost non-existent, but 'act strangely' is more productive than 'act strange', which is not non-existent at ...
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'Cheddar goes “good” with burgers?' Can “go” be seen as a verb of the senses?

I know that the adverb modifies a verb except for in some limited cases such as verbs of the senses or copula. "It tastes good.", not "It tastes well." "It looks good.", not "It looks well." ...
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the accident happened a mile west of Bowes (Is 'west' an adverb?)

The Lexico Oxford Dictionary defines a use of 'west' as an adverb: To or towards the west. he faced west and watched the sunset the accident happened a mile west of Bowes I can easily ...
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As what does “very much” function in “to be very much”?

wikipedia.org: The predicative expression accompanying the copula, also known as the complement of the copula, may take any of several possible forms: it may be a noun or noun phrase, an ...
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Phrasal prepositional verbs with objects and adverbs?

"We fixed Tom up quickly with new tools" Hi guys, here's a doubt I have. Although I would more than likely place the adverb "quickly" between the subject "We" and verb "fixed" in this sentence to ...
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1answer
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Is “A increases the bigger B becomes” a legal English sentence pattern? Is it really a disguised “the more X, the more Y” pattern?

For many years I’ve been using constructions of two interrelated clauses where each of the two verbs comes with a comparative adverb or adjective of some sort (so either with more or less, or else ...
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2answers
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Isn’t “higher-priced products” with an adjective ungrammatical for the correct “more highly priced products” with an adverb?

The phrase higher-priced products is very common, but isn’t it grammatically incorrect? The adjective higher is being forced to servce as an adverb here, so the phrase should instead be more highly ...
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595 views

Is the word 'home" never an adverb?

He is home He is at home He went home I know that in the sentence 1 and 3 the word home is considered an adverb and in the sentence 2, home is considered a noun. According to Rod Mitchell, ...
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Difference among You never change. and You change never. and Never do you change

I think "You never change." is the most usual and basic. But "You change never." is also well used in spoken English. "Never do you change." is almost never seen on books and heard in conversations. I ...
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2answers
109 views

What are AWAY and APART modifying here?

I wanted to ask a question about the adverbs away and apart. The villages are miles apart. The exam is only two weeks away. It is three days apart. It is five kilometers away/apart. Away and apart ...
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3answers
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How to analyze “dearly beloved”?

I'm curious about the phrase “dearly beloved”. – It looks to me to be a phrase consisting of an adverb (dearly) modifying a noun (beloved). But I thought adverbs could only modify verbs or adjectives? ...
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190 views

Stupid and/or stupidly

As I understand the word 'stupid' is used as a noun, an adjective and as an adverb. However there is also the word 'stupidly' of which I think that's the proper adverb, but it is hardly used. Common ...
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Meaning of “need but read”?

I saw the sentence something like "One need but read the depressing accounts of how people lived in London and other large British cities early in the 20th century to be grateful that the good old ...

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