Questions tagged [adverbials]

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2
votes
3answers
1k views

What’s the ‘accusative absolute’?

I read the following definition for accusative absolute, but the many syntactical terms (based on Latin) confound me: accusative and nominative absolute. a construction in English, especially ...
4
votes
2answers
4k views

Adverbial phrase

What is an adverbial phrase ? I recently learnt 'to boot' , meaning in addition, as well. And someone was saying it is an adverbial phrase. I think I know what is an adverb, but never learnt of ...
3
votes
5answers
2k views

Using “quite” with a noun

From the website of Cambridge Dictionary: We can use quite + a/an before a noun to give it more emphasis or importance: There was quite a crowd at the party. It makes quite a ...
5
votes
2answers
112k views

When to use “in the last year”, “last year” and “in the past year”?

I'm curious about the differences between "in the last year", "in the past year" and "last year". I went to NY in the past year Last year I went to NY. In the last year I went to NY (This sounds ...
2
votes
2answers
448 views

What is and isn't a constituent, and how (whether?) can one argue that something is or isn't grammatical

Background In CGEL on p. 1317, we find the following analysis of the sentence [1] [Beauty] [as well as love] is redemptive. They note that the singular is signifies that as well as is here not a ...
3
votes
3answers
875 views

What is the usage of “in it fat” in this sentence?

I found this sentence: It has in it fat, which gives energy. I can't figure out the usage of the part "in it fat". Can anyone kindly explain it or maybe give some examples please?
1
vote
0answers
69 views

May an adverbial qualifier suffice to free the word “free” of its ambiguity?

Free is an ambiguous word. For the purpose of this question I'll skip any meaning the word may bear as a verb, and I'll also overlook the "free from/of" variant. In fact, I'll just focus on the two ...