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Questions tagged [adverb-position]

The position of an adverb often depends on the kind of adverb (manner, place, time, degree) and if the word being modified is a verb or an adjective.

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Adverb placement

Are these sentences all grammatically correct? I didn't support Gheddafi and I will never support him. I didn't support Gheddafi and will never support him. I didn't support Gheddafi and never ...
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“How best to handle” vs. “how to best handle”

Are there rules on the placement of 'best'? They are deciding how to best handle the matter. They are deciding how best to handle the matter. Is one of them wrong?
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Placement of 'Little'

According to the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary, 'little' as an adverb could mean: not much; only slightly Is there a preference among these sentences? He little helped his ...
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2answers
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Adverb word order: “nicely shows” vs “shows nicely”

I have the following sentence in my dissertation: The even-tempered STO basis for Mg shows nicely why the virial theorem cannot be trusted as an error indicator. However, previously I had there: ...
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4answers
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Does adverb placement affect meaning?

He swam slowly to the island. He slowly swam to the island. Some experts say that there is a “slight difference” in meaning. Would you please tell me that difference?
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Adverbs position in English: “place–manner–time” or “manner–place–time”?

Wikipedia tells us that the order should be place–manner–time. However, this webpage tells that it should be manner–Place–Time. Which one is correct? I have one sentence in two different orders: No ...
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1answer
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Adverb position in perfect tenses [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Are there any rules on the positioning adverbs should take in a sentence? My question concerns the adverb position in perfect tenses. For example look at these sentences: ...
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3answers
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Difference between styles of English in technical communication

I have a collaborative software project with two other users. Nearly every technical report and documentation written goes through the following editorial changes to some of the sentences (examples ...
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2answers
3k views

Where should I place the adverb?

Where should I place the adverb? Potentially, it could be moved back to where it was. It could be potentially moved back to where it was. It could potentially be moved back to where it was. ...
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4answers
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Differences between “just might” and “might just?”

Can someone help me understand more precisely the connotative differences between "just might" and "might just I came upon this dilemma while working on a short comic strip. In the first panel, a ...
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1answer
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Adverb placement in “Let's simply share”

To me the expression Let's simply share seems wrong. I've always thought the adverb should come after the verb. Is that correct?
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1answer
15k views

“I finally was able” or “I was finally able”?

Is one form wrong or more correct than the other? Or do they have different meanings? I'm a non-native speaker trying to figure it out.
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2answers
27k views

Where should adverbs be placed?

There are two sentences: I completely understand. I understand completely. Which one is correct and why? Another example: I slowly opened the door. I opened the door slowly.
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Should an adverb go before or after a verb?

For example: The word rarely turns up outside of those contexts. The word turns up rarely outside of those contexts. Which one is correct and why?
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3answers
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Are there any rules on the positioning adverbs should take in a sentence?

For example: Ever wish you could share information broadly Could it be rewritten to: Ever wish you could broadly share information Are there any rules for the position of the adverbs.
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Correct position of “only”

Which is grammatically correct? I can only do so much in this time. or I can do only so much in this time.