Questions tagged [adverb-position]

The position of an adverb often depends on the kind of adverb (manner, place, time, degree) and if the word being modified is a verb or an adjective.

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2answers
654 views

Are these sentences grammatically correct? (the usage of “everything”)

I've taught students English in Korea and now I'm grading test papers. The question was to translate Korean into English and the right answer we wanted was => The book was so popular that it sold out ...
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5k views

“It usually is” vs “it is usually” [duplicate]

It is very common to use the verb 'to be' before adverbs of frequency as in the following example: Her cake is usually tasty. However, I came across the following construction in which the verb '...
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enough better, better enough, sufficiently better, sufficiently well, or well enough?

Someone asked about using "enough" in front of a comparative adjective e.g. "he felt enough better to go back to work." A lively discussion ensued between the BrE and AmE contingents about whether a) ...
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361 views

Does the position of the adverb in a sentence change anything?

Consider the following sentence: I ate the sandwich quickly. The word "quickly" modifies "ate the sandwich." Should the adverb be placed up front, as in I quickly ate the sandwich. would it ...
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“A person who not only consumes” or “a person who doesn't only consume”? which one is right?

I don't know if the question I am going to ask sounds stupid to some of you. I just looked up for the difference between a vegetarian and a vegan. And I was about to write the definition of "vegan" in ...
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1answer
572 views

Adverb placement: Obviously and Definitely

I had a grammar test this morning and I was asked in one of the exercises to place the adverb between brackets into their right positions, here's the exact line I had to solve: He can't go with ...
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1answer
163 views

Subject–auxiliary inversions beginning with an adverb

I am interested in subject–auxiliary inversions when the sentence begins with an adverb or an adverbial phrase. If the adverb is not negative (for instance, "not only" or "never"), can we invert the ...
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1answer
172 views

Please help identify correct verb placement [duplicate]

I would appreciate your help in figuring out the correct phrasing / verb|adverb placement for the following phrase(s): "Her talents will be best expressed..." vs. "Her talents will best be ...
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Placement of adverbials

Max prepares the tea with an electric heater in his shop every day. Max prepares the tea in his shop every day with an electric heater. I am bit confused about how to use these kinds of ...
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2answers
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“early in the morning” and “ in the early morning”

Is there any difference between the two phrases ? 1) There are numerous health benefits of drinking water on an empty stomach in the early morning. 2) There are numerous health benefits of drinking ...
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1answer
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Regarding Adverb's position [duplicate]

The business was registered officially. or The business was officially registered. Where to place the word 'officially'?
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1answer
549 views

-ly adverb placement: “primarily consisted of [noun]” or “consisted primarily of [noun]”

I'm troubled by "primarily consisted of" versus "consisted primarily of." To me, the former seems clumsy, and the latter seems smoother. I'm American and live in the mid-west. Is the second ...
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3answers
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What's best/correct English? (something) isn't consistently in place, OR (something) is inconsistently in place? [closed]

(something) isn't consistently in place, OR (something) is inconsistently in place?
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Placing the adverb “today” in a sentence

I'm not sure about where I should put the adverb "today" in the following sentence: His work is regarded as one of the highest peaks of Western culture. I have a couple of options and I think that,...
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1answer
65 views

Adverb position in title

I need to express in the following section heading that the manner of adding the units to the Contract is manual and not automatic: Adding Units to a Contract I would like to do as much as ...
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1answer
829 views

“even” position in a sentence

I found an example: I haven’t even started making dinner. What about I even haven't started making dinner? Would it be also correct?
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Adverb position

She smiled shyly. She shyly smiled. which sentence is right? if the position of Adverb is not important, is it acceptable to write "Fast he runs" like this, then? it sounds weird, but it might ...
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2answers
648 views

Meaning of “I don't love her because she is beautiful.” [closed]

I don't love her because she is beautiful. This sentence is in my grammar book. It means I love her not because she is beautiful. I am confused!
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1answer
216 views

“At least” as focus adverb

There is at least one distributor interested. ("at least" means "a minimum of") At least there is one distributor interested. ("at least" means "fortunately, happily") Are the explanations correct? ...
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1answer
186 views

Where to put an adverb? [duplicate]

Can somebody say where I should put the adverb in this phrase: "I’m going to thoroughly teach you a lesson." or "I’m going to teach you a lesson thoroughly." And which ...
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2answers
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What does the adverb “yesterday” modifiy in a clause?

Not only yesterday, but other Time Adverbs as well. What do they "modify" in a clause? Example: The athletes ran yesterday
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Adverb and verb position [duplicate]

I want you to clearly understand that excuses will not do. I want you to understand clearly that excuses will not do. My book says that second sentence is correct. What is the logic behind it?
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Does the word ‘not’ modify verbs beforehand or afterward?

I have had some trouble recently with the word not, and people being confused by my use of it. I suppose I made some incorrect logical connection with it. A friend and I were discussing the placement ...
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2answers
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Where should “just” go when describing possibility?

Which is the grammatically correct way to write this sentence? Ask, we may just have what you are looking for. Ask, we just may have what you are looking for.
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1answer
933 views

Adverb “already”

I have got a question about the adverb "already". Where should we put it in the sentence? Is "already" put after a subject and auxiliary verb but before predicate verb in the sentence? May we also put ...
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1answer
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The strange positioning of the adverb “overland”

What is so peculiar about the adverb overland? The marine brigade in Belgium cautiously advances to Picardy. The marine brigade in Belgium therefore advances to Picardy. The marine brigade ...
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2answers
186 views

“suffer harshly” or “harshly suffer”

I was talking with a native English speaker saying "The Eurozone is harshly suffering as well." He reminded me that "harshly suffering" sounds odd, which he cannot explain, and I should say "The ...
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2answers
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Use of 'already' in future tenses

I understand that 'already' is good friends with perfect tenses and it can also be used with the present and the past, but what about future tenses? I found the following sentences on the Internet: ...
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2answers
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Adverb placement, before or after the verb [duplicate]

first time on this side of the StackExchange. Quick question: My dream is to code a chess game, and then have the AI I developed checkmate me legitimately. vs. My dream is to code a chess ...
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Where to position “never” in a sentence?

The following is a quote from Mr. Trump's statement. Is it grammatical to say "We should have never been in Iraq"? Shouldn't it be "We should never have been in Iraq"? "We should have never been in ...
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2answers
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Position of the adverb “substantially”

What would be the right position of "substantially" in the following: 1). Before verb: These optimal values substantially contribute to the success of the methodology. 2). After verb: These ...
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1answer
973 views

“I decided just to go away”, “I decided to just go away”, “I just decided to go away”?

What I mean is: I decide this: just going away. Does any of the sentences below convey that sense in a gramatically correct way? I decided just to go away. I decided to just go away. I just decided ...
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2answers
434 views

Placement of the word, 'always', in a sentence

'She was astonished when she opened her gift because it was always what she wanted.' This sentence sounds awkward to me. Why is that? It seems like it should be written as follows: 'She was ...
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4answers
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What's the meaning of “You better take this”?

My mother tongue is Hindi. I was watching an English movie when I came across the below sentence. Although it is a dual language movie and that helps me to understand English and improve my vocabulary,...
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1answer
234 views

The correct placement of “only” [duplicate]

As an English learner, I have been confused about the position of the adverb from the beginning. Here is a question which puzzles me: A) It only took him ten minutes to do the test. B) It took him ...
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Is there a difference between “Who necessarily do not exist” or “who do not exist necessarily”?

This is from the English version of the book "The Name of the Rose" by Umberto Eco. Brother William was arguing that the non-Christian people should also be given the right to rule. Here are some ...
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5answers
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Dangling or Misplaced Modifiers: the use of adverbs

When you say: I earn fifty dollars a week scarcely. I know this is not correct. It doesn't sound right and you can't apply an adverb to "a week" because it doesn't make sense and that's not the ...
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746 views

“We just need to rename” or “We need just to rename”

I want to say that just in case we want to rename something (in programming) we should do something. Which of the sentences is correct? In case we need just to rename the message... In case we ...
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2answers
71 views

What is more correct and why?

Technology helps us better understand more things. Technology helps us to understand better more things.
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What are the differences between “so” and “so much”?

When I received your email, I was so much glad. Do you think that, in above sentence, the use of "so much" is correct? What should I use? If I use, "so" instead of "so much", does the meaning of ...
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2answers
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Where should the adverb “soon” be positioned?

It says that the position of adverbs should come before the verb and the example they give is: We will soon have a break. In this example, is it not acceptable to have the adverb after the verb: ...
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1answer
567 views

What is the effect/purpose of moving adverbs to the beginning of a sentence?

It's often said that changing word order serves to add emphasis to the element moved out of its normal place, but I have doubts. Take for example the sentence: I spoke to Jim about the party on ...
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1answer
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Questions about adverb phrases (or prepositional phrase working as complements)

When there are two adverb phrases of same kind, it is recommended to put the more descriptive one in the front. But this people used and in between those adverb phrases. My room was in the ship ...
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1answer
4k views

Ending a sentence in the past tense with 'soon'

I was marking some exams for my Japanese high school students, and one of the test problems is: Arrange the following words into a sentence: walk / started / they / soon / to Without fail, all ~300 ...
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1answer
798 views

Where do I place the frequency adverb “often”? [duplicate]

Imagine the following situation: Person A says to person B, that B will be the target of taunt/sneers/ridicule etc. Is it possible to formulate the following sentence (regarding the word order)? "...
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1answer
986 views

“relate better” vs. “better relate” [closed]

Please help settle a dispute (in my head). Which of the following phrases works better? Disregard the old "no split infinitives" rule. If either phrase is considered correct, which phrase rolls off ...
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1answer
166 views

How does adverb placement affect the meaning of a sentence?

I want to correct the following sentence so that it is grammatically correct and still conveys the original meaning: Many alcoholics attempt to conceal their problem from their fellow workers, but ...
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1answer
50 views

Why “the collaboratively working class was somebody else's idea”?

The class working collaboratively was somebody else's idea. In this sentence, why is it possible to say "the class working collaboratively"? I have seen so many sentences with words ending in -ly ...
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Which is better: “related more” or “was more related”

It actually related more to his genetics than his behavior. or It actually was more related to his genetics than his behavior.
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Is it ok to use “finally” at the end of the sentence like this?

Is it OK to use finally at the end of the sentence like this? I am a teacher finally. Or are the below ones only possible? I finally am a teacher. I am finally a teacher. Most people ...