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Questions tagged [adverb-position]

The position of an adverb often depends on the kind of adverb (manner, place, time, degree) and if the word being modified is a verb or an adjective.

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“It really doesn't matter” v “It doesn't really matter”

I can't distinguish the difference in meaning between these two sentences. It really doesn't matter. It doesn't really matter. It seems that there is a nuanced difference, but I ...
37
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5answers
36k views

Correct position of “only”

Which is grammatically correct? I can only do so much in this time. or I can do only so much in this time.
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5answers
89k views

Difference between “I am really sorry” and “I really am sorry”

I know they are slightly different, but I can't tell how. I've read about the usage of the word "really" in a negative sentence. But it didn't tell me about how the position of the word "really" can ...
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5answers
181k views

Should an adverb go before or after a verb?

For example: The word rarely turns up outside of those contexts. The word turns up rarely outside of those contexts. Which one is correct and why?
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3answers
1k views

Difference between styles of English in technical communication

I have a collaborative software project with two other users. Nearly every technical report and documentation written goes through the following editorial changes to some of the sentences (examples ...
15
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8answers
5k views

Indian English use of “only”

I am from Bangalore and people here tend use the word only to emphasise something in a sentence. For example: We are getting that only printed. What is the proper way to put it?
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3answers
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“to not get” vs “not to get”

I came across this sentence in an article, "As she speaks of her family, friends and life, it's difficult to not get that 'feel good' mood." I'm wondering if the following sentence could also mean ...
10
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2answers
1k views

Is there a difference between “Who necessarily do not exist” or “who do not exist necessarily”?

This is from the English version of the book "The Name of the Rose" by Umberto Eco. Brother William was arguing that the non-Christian people should also be given the right to rule. Here are some ...
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3answers
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Near, near to and nearby. What's the difference?

Why isn't near, near to and nearby always interchangeable? They can precede the noun. I live nearby the railway station I live near the railway station I live near to the railway station ...
9
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3answers
724 views

“We just need to rename” or “We need just to rename”

I want to say that just in case we want to rename something (in programming) we should do something. Which of the sentences is correct? In case we need just to rename the message... In case we ...
8
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3answers
4k views

Are there any rules on the positioning adverbs should take in a sentence?

For example: Ever wish you could share information broadly Could it be rewritten to: Ever wish you could broadly share information Are there any rules for the position of the adverbs.
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5answers
16k views

“How best to handle” vs. “how to best handle”

Are there rules on the placement of 'best'? They are deciding how to best handle the matter. They are deciding how best to handle the matter. Is one of them wrong?
8
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2answers
3k views

Where should I place the adverb?

Where should I place the adverb? Potentially, it could be moved back to where it was. It could be potentially moved back to where it was. It could potentially be moved back to where it was. ...
8
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4answers
553 views

“currently is a …” or “is currently a …”

I'm not sure which statement is more correct. John has been with the team since 2010 and is currently a senior researcher OR John has been with the team since 2010 and currently is a senior ...
8
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2answers
25k views

Where should adverbs be placed?

There are two sentences: I completely understand. I understand completely. Which one is correct and why? Another example: I slowly opened the door. I opened the door slowly.
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3answers
25k views

should be always or should always be? [duplicate]

I am not a native speaker, I do not know how to say this properly: "It should be always on", or "It should always be on"? Is there any difference?
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2answers
4k views

Where to place 'only' relative to prepositions?

I know that questions about the placement of 'only', are often asked here; accordingly, I searched for an answer to my question before posting it. Question Where are focusing adverbs placed relative ...
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3answers
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Adverbs position in English: “place–manner–time” or “manner–place–time”?

Wikipedia tells us that the order should be place–manner–time. However, this webpage tells that it should be manner–Place–Time. Which one is correct? I have one sentence in two different orders: No ...
6
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3answers
18k views

Adverbs + Present Perfect

Here's my problem: I've been confused about the placement of adverbs in present/past perfect phrases. For example, which sentence would sound better: "We had been slowly drifting down the river ...
5
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5answers
406 views

Dangling or Misplaced Modifiers: the use of adverbs

When you say: I earn fifty dollars a week scarcely. I know this is not correct. It doesn't sound right and you can't apply an adverb to "a week" because it doesn't make sense and that's not the ...
5
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1answer
13k views

“I finally was able” or “I was finally able”?

Is one form wrong or more correct than the other? Or do they have different meanings? I'm a non-native speaker trying to figure it out.
5
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4answers
532 views

enough better, better enough, sufficiently better, sufficiently well, or well enough?

Someone asked about using "enough" in front of a comparative adjective e.g. "he felt enough better to go back to work." A lively discussion ensued between the BrE and AmE contingents about whether a) ...
4
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2answers
25k views

Adverb placement: “There is still” vs. “there still is”

I believe the following sentences are grammatically correct and that perhaps the latter has an emphasizing effect on still in certain contexts. There is still some time left. There still is some ...
4
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1answer
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Use of “did” in an affirmative sentence before subject [duplicate]

I wrote the following sentence in an article: Only in June it created repositories. The editor corrected me: Only in June did it create repositories. What's the explanation for "did" in this ...
4
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1answer
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Adverb position in perfect tenses [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Are there any rules on the positioning adverbs should take in a sentence? My question concerns the adverb position in perfect tenses. For example look at these sentences: ...
4
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2answers
612 views

Are these sentences grammatically correct? (the usage of “everything”)

I've taught students English in Korea and now I'm grading test papers. The question was to translate Korean into English and the right answer we wanted was => The book was so popular that it sold out ...
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4answers
1k views

Posititon of an adverb of manner with participles

I have seen many rules about position of an adverbs with finite forms of verbs but I can't find the rule about where to place an adverb with nonfinitive verbs. For example which of the sentence sounds ...
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4answers
2k views

Does adverb placement affect meaning?

He swam slowly to the island. He slowly swam to the island. Some experts say that there is a “slight difference” in meaning. Would you please tell me that difference?
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2answers
402 views

Why does this sentence seem to me to have an adverb for a subject? [closed]

At the bottom of the device is a microphone and a microUSB port for data connections and charging (Source) At the bottom of the device is an adverb of place. Why is the subject of the sentence an ...
3
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5answers
1k views

Placement of 'Little'

According to the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary, 'little' as an adverb could mean: not much; only slightly Is there a preference among these sentences? He little helped his ...
3
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1answer
536 views

Adverb placement: Obviously and Definitely

I had a grammar test this morning and I was asked in one of the exercises to place the adverb between brackets into their right positions, here's the exact line I had to solve: He can't go with ...
3
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1answer
1k views

Adverb placement in “Let's simply share”

To me the expression Let's simply share seems wrong. I've always thought the adverb should come after the verb. Is that correct?
3
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1answer
627 views

Does it make sense to end this sentence with “manually”

This sentence: Verify that the table includes the configured values manually. Is it the same as saying: Manually verify that the table includes the configured values. or the same as: Verify,...
3
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1answer
106 views

Why “would rather” +noun is feasible?Without principal verb

A sentence from TE,however find no grammatical rules supporting the sentence. Thanks you in advance. Many politicians, business people, intellectuals, journalists and even whisky-swilling generals ...
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2answers
1k views

Position of the adverb “substantially”

What would be the right position of "substantially" in the following: 1). Before verb: These optimal values substantially contribute to the success of the methodology. 2). After verb: These ...
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3answers
5k views

Using “kindly” as an adverb to indicate humility [duplicate]

Is it the following correct to say? May I kindly request ..." As when calling a celebrity onstage during an event Would it not be better to say, May I request so and so to kindly come ...
3
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2answers
174 views

“suffer harshly” or “harshly suffer”

I was talking with a native English speaker saying "The Eurozone is harshly suffering as well." He reminded me that "harshly suffering" sounds odd, which he cannot explain, and I should say "The ...
3
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1answer
235 views

Questions about adverb phrases (or prepositional phrase working as complements)

When there are two adverb phrases of same kind, it is recommended to put the more descriptive one in the front. But this people used and in between those adverb phrases. My room was in the ship ...
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3answers
1k views

Proper placement of “exactly”?

I want to ask a question whose meaning is "what is the exact way in which X works?". Where is the most appropriate place for the adverb "exactly"? How exactly does X work? How does exactly X work? ...
3
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2answers
2k views

Use of 'already' in future tenses

I understand that 'already' is good friends with perfect tenses and it can also be used with the present and the past, but what about future tenses? I found the following sentences on the Internet: ...
2
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2answers
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position of “only”

Which sentence is correct? (A) Mosquito larvae can only be seen through a microscope. (B) Mosquito larvae can be only seen through a microscope. (C) Mosquito larvae can be seen only through ...
2
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2answers
2k views

Adverb position in “Listen carefully to what I say” [closed]

I've come across the phrase "Listen carefully to what I say" and I'm really not sure why carefully has gone in between listen and to. It doesn't happen with other verbs; you don't "switch carefully on ...
2
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1answer
4k views

Ending a sentence in the past tense with 'soon'

I was marking some exams for my Japanese high school students, and one of the test problems is: Arrange the following words into a sentence: walk / started / they / soon / to Without fail, all ~300 ...
2
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1answer
331 views

Does the position of the adverb in a sentence change anything?

Consider the following sentence: I ate the sandwich quickly. The word "quickly" modifies "ate the sandwich." Should the adverb be placed up front, as in I quickly ate the sandwich. would it ...
2
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1answer
655 views

Place of the adverb daily in the sentence

Is daily usually placed before or after the main verb? It is not possible to effectively check it by searching the Web because daily is the adjective as well. Security for OEM storage is tied to ...
2
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2answers
1k views

Order of multiple adverbs

1) Нe went upstairs quietly last night. 2) Нe quietly went upstairs last night. What version is right? I can't find information about this issue.
2
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2answers
6k views

Position of Adverbs in Negative Sentences [closed]

How am I supposed to write the sentences below in the negative form? Example A: A.1) Lila is certainly not going to be very happy about it or A.2) Lila isn't certainly going to be very happy ...
2
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1answer
26k views

Position of “now” in a sentence [closed]

What is the correct position of "now" in the following sentence. What is the rule for this? We now consider the second case. We consider now the second case. We consider the second case now. Now we ...
2
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1answer
684 views

This was made in China in 2004. / This was made in 2004 in China [closed]

1a. This is a book written in English in America. 1b. This is a book written in America in English. 2a. This was made in China in 2004. 2b. This was made in 2004 in China. edit: sorry, may I ...
2
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1answer
466 views

-ly adverb placement: “primarily consisted of [noun]” or “consisted primarily of [noun]”

I'm troubled by "primarily consisted of" versus "consisted primarily of." To me, the former seems clumsy, and the latter seems smoother. I'm American and live in the mid-west. Is the second ...