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Questions tagged [adverb-position]

The position of an adverb often depends on the kind of adverb (manner, place, time, degree) and if the word being modified is a verb or an adjective.

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Correct position of “only”

Which is grammatically correct? I can only do so much in this time. or I can do only so much in this time.
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Are there any rules on the positioning adverbs should take in a sentence?

For example: Ever wish you could share information broadly Could it be rewritten to: Ever wish you could broadly share information Are there any rules for the position of the adverbs.
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Should an adverb go before or after a verb?

For example: The word rarely turns up outside of those contexts. The word turns up rarely outside of those contexts. Which one is correct and why?
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Where to place 'only' relative to prepositions?

I know that questions about the placement of 'only', are often asked here; accordingly, I searched for an answer to my question before posting it. Question Where are focusing adverbs placed relative ...
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2answers
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position of “only”

Which sentence is correct? (A) Mosquito larvae can only be seen through a microscope. (B) Mosquito larvae can be only seen through a microscope. (C) Mosquito larvae can be seen only through ...
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4answers
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Does adverb placement affect meaning?

He swam slowly to the island. He slowly swam to the island. Some experts say that there is a “slight difference” in meaning. Would you please tell me that difference?
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2answers
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Adverb order: 'has largely been' or 'has been largely' [duplicate]

Does the placement of an adverb affect its meaning or application? Does each paired sentence here mean the same as the other? 1.1 Mobile technology progress has largely been consumer-driven rather ...
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1answer
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“It is time now” or “It is now time”? [closed]

It is time now or It is now time Which of these expressions is grammatically correct?
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Near, near to and nearby. What's the difference?

Why isn't near, near to and nearby always interchangeable? They can precede the noun. I live nearby the railway station I live near the railway station I live near to the railway station ...
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3answers
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Adverbs position in English: “place–manner–time” or “manner–place–time”?

Wikipedia tells us that the order should be place–manner–time. However, this webpage tells that it should be manner–Place–Time. Which one is correct? I have one sentence in two different orders: No ...
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1answer
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Adverb placement in “Let's simply share”

To me the expression Let's simply share seems wrong. I've always thought the adverb should come after the verb. Is that correct?
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“It really doesn't matter” v “It doesn't really matter”

I can't distinguish the difference in meaning between these two sentences. It really doesn't matter. It doesn't really matter. It seems that there is a nuanced difference, but I ...
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8answers
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Indian English use of “only”

I am from Bangalore and people here tend use the word only to emphasise something in a sentence. For example: We are getting that only printed. What is the proper way to put it?
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Adverbs + Present Perfect

Here's my problem: I've been confused about the placement of adverbs in present/past perfect phrases. For example, which sentence would sound better: "We had been slowly drifting down the river ...
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1answer
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Does the position of the adverb in a sentence change anything?

Consider the following sentence: I ate the sandwich quickly. The word "quickly" modifies "ate the sandwich." Should the adverb be placed up front, as in I quickly ate the sandwich. would it ...
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2answers
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Adverb position in “Listen carefully to what I say” [closed]

I've come across the phrase "Listen carefully to what I say" and I'm really not sure why carefully has gone in between listen and to. It doesn't happen with other verbs; you don't "switch carefully on ...
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3answers
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Adverb position: 'I have also been working" or 'I have been also working'?

I doubt about the place of the adverb 'also' in the following sentence: 'I work at the hospital, and for three years I have also been working for my PhD at the University.' Should I say: 'I have been ...
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1answer
962 views

“may even have” or “may have even”?

Is either of these 'more correct'? She may even have pre-empted us. She may have even pre-empted us. Is it purely a case of which sounds better in any case, or are there specific rules?
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1answer
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Position of adverbs [closed]

I am bit confused when it comes to the positioning of adverbs determinations in a sentence. I was told that you can place them almost everywhere like in: To be a teacher not only means to teach a ...
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3answers
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Difference between styles of English in technical communication

I have a collaborative software project with two other users. Nearly every technical report and documentation written goes through the following editorial changes to some of the sentences (examples ...
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2answers
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Where should adverbs be placed?

There are two sentences: I completely understand. I understand completely. Which one is correct and why? Another example: I slowly opened the door. I opened the door slowly.
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2answers
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Where should I place the adverb?

Where should I place the adverb? Potentially, it could be moved back to where it was. It could be potentially moved back to where it was. It could potentially be moved back to where it was. ...
2
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1answer
27k views

Position of “now” in a sentence [closed]

What is the correct position of "now" in the following sentence. What is the rule for this? We now consider the second case. We consider now the second case. We consider the second case now. Now we ...
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2answers
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Adverb placement

Are the sentences below grammatically correct? I didn't support Gheddafi and I will never support him. I didn't support Gheddafi and will never support him. I didn't support Gheddafi and never ...
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1answer
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“I finally was able” or “I was finally able”?

Is one form wrong or more correct than the other? Or do they have different meanings? I'm a non-native speaker trying to figure it out.
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Position of the adverb “substantially”

What would be the right position of "substantially" in the following: 1). Before verb: These optimal values substantially contribute to the success of the methodology. 2). After verb: These ...
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2answers
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Position of Adverbs in Negative Sentences [closed]

How am I supposed to write the sentences below in the negative form? Example A: A.1) Lila is certainly not going to be very happy about it or A.2) Lila isn't certainly going to be very happy ...
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1answer
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“even” position in a sentence

I found an example: I haven’t even started making dinner. What about I even haven't started making dinner? Would it be also correct?
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Position of the word ‘just’

I was just watching a tv show where they used the following sentence: He probably just hasn't gotten around to it yet It was a reply to the question, “Why didn't he inform you about it?” I want ...
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1answer
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Only requires or requires only [duplicate]

I am always unsure about the position of "only" in the sentence. For example: This ticket only costs 5 dollars. This ticket costs only 5 dollars. Are there any difference? Which one is better?