Questions tagged [adverb-position]

The position of an adverb often depends on the kind of adverb (manner, place, time, degree) and if the word being modified is a verb or an adjective.

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1answer
56 views

“will be finally” or “will finally be”?

What I know is that adverbs are positioned between "be" verb and passive verb, but I can find many examples of both sentences: "will be finally deleted" OR "will finally be deleted"? "have ...
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2answers
75 views

Placement of adverb with gerund-participle that is the object of a preposition

I have a rather fussy grammar question, and I'm having a hard time finding out whether there even is a rule that applies here. Even describing the structure correctly is a bit of a challenge. The ...
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1answer
87 views

We only have 2 possibilities - position of “only”

Is there any difference of meaning between the 3 following sentences? We only have 2 possibilities. We have only 2 possibilities. We have 2 possibilities only. I have already read Correct position ...
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5answers
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Adverbs + Present Perfect

Here's my problem: I've been confused about the placement of adverbs in present/past perfect phrases. For example, which sentence would sound better: "We had been slowly drifting down the river ...
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2answers
105 views

Can 'too'be used immediately after the subject?

Let her too wake up to a hot coffee. (or) Let her wake up to a hot cup of coffee too. Here I am trying to convey that what she does for you everyday, you do it for her too. I want to use the ...
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1answer
18 views

Grammar and adverbs question [closed]

Is this question written correctly? Has the problem been solved already? or maybe is this way Has the problem already been solved? are both correct?
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1answer
225 views

“He then” vs “Then He” vs “Then, He” — conjunctive adverbs, semicolons, and commas

As far as I understand, you use a semi-colon to separate main clauses joined by conjunctive adverbs (however, therefore, moreover, nevertheless, then, thus). And, when you use a conjunctive adverb, ...
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1answer
46 views

Where should an adverb be positioned when converting from active to passive? [closed]

Please consider this example sentence: Karen spoke rudely to the manager. Should the corresponding sentence rearranged into the passive be: The manager was spoken rudely to by Karen. The manager ...
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4answers
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What's the meaning of “You better take this”?

My mother tongue is Hindi. I was watching an English movie when I came across the below sentence. Although it is a dual language movie and that helps me to understand English and improve my vocabulary,...
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1answer
27 views

Place the adverb before or after “to”?

Take for instance these two sentences: [...] to confirm to clients that they are eating food free from contaminants and disease-causing bacteria, but also to identify the properties of the dishes. ...
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8answers
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Indian English use of “only”

I am from Bangalore and people here tend use the word only to emphasise something in a sentence. For example: We are getting that only printed. What is the proper way to put it?
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2answers
56 views

“To read this book later” and “To later read this book” - the difference

There is a dialog between two persons, and they are discussing some book owned by third person. There are 2 versions of phrase: To read this book later -- ask John. To later read this book -- ask ...
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2answers
38 views

What is the difference in meaning between these four constructions?

It is usual that some adverbs can be used in different positions in a sentence, which causes a change in meaning. And this can be difficult for a non-native speaker to understand. Here is an example ...
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1answer
129 views

Where to position adverbs

They may sound both correct but which one is more acceptable in standard written English? She is writing a letter now. or She is now writing a letter. Thanks
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1answer
87 views

The position of ‘constantly’ in “would be being used”

Personal computers first made their appearance in the home in the 1970s, but surely few people would have been able to imagine then that the home computer could evolve into the super-fast, super-...
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2answers
556 views

will soon receive or will receive soon

I was wondering if there is a specific preference for the soon position in the following line: You will receive a message with the activation link soon. Or if it is better/more common to use: ...
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5answers
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Correct position of “only”

Which is grammatically correct? I can only do so much in this time. or I can do only so much in this time.
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1answer
189 views

Why “would rather” +noun is feasible?Without principal verb

A sentence from TE,however find no grammatical rules supporting the sentence. Thanks you in advance. Many politicians, business people, intellectuals, journalists and even whisky-swilling generals ...
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2answers
68 views

Putting adverbs such as “on Wednesday” in the beginning and at the end of sentences

What's the difference between the following two sentences: On Wednesday I went shopping I went shopping on Wednesday
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1answer
28 views
0
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1answer
290 views

Position of adverbs [closed]

I am bit confused when it comes to the positioning of adverbs determinations in a sentence. I was told that you can place them almost everywhere like in: To be a teacher not only means to teach a ...
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1answer
36 views

ADV of Manner between Transitive Verb and DO

In a book about the philosophy of William James, I have found the pattern transitive verb (to appreciate) + adverb of manner (fully) + direct object (what James means by distinguishing knowing into ...
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4answers
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“currently is a …” or “is currently a …”

I'm not sure which statement is more correct. John has been with the team since 2010 and is currently a senior researcher OR John has been with the team since 2010 and currently is a senior ...
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1answer
38 views

'normally' adverb placement

Which phrase is correct? A will normally be finished by the end of the week, or, A will be normally finished by the end of the week. The meaning I'm trying to convey is that if nothing abnormal ...
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1answer
556 views

“We also recently” or “We recently also”?

Title says it all. The sentence is We also recently started playing other games. or We recently also started playing other games. Which is preferable?
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1answer
739 views

Can we use an adverb together with nouns?

i know that the preposition can be used with nouns. For example : skin between your ...... connection between....... the girl after you...... the car ...
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1answer
4k views

'Not being able to' vs 'Being not able to' , which is grammtical?

which is grammatical between the two sentences below? We end up not being able to deal with new situations. We end up being not able to deal with new situations.
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1answer
829 views

“even” position in a sentence

I found an example: I haven’t even started making dinner. What about I even haven't started making dinner? Would it be also correct?
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1answer
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“in favor” used adverbially

I'd like to know whether the phrase "in favor" can be used adverbially, e.g. They all voted in favor.
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1answer
47 views

“I’ve still berries in the fridge”

There was a question posted on Twitter: Grammar-expert friends: Help needed! I couldn’t find conclusive answers via google so I’ll ask here: I’m writing some lyrics and I want to say “I’ve still (...
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2answers
75 views

Is there a word for near the tip of an object?

I am designing a device with two similar components close to its tip, see below. I need some descriptors to tell the two components apart. What would be the best words to describe the positions? ...
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3answers
46 views

Position of an adverb in this sentence [duplicate]

I hope you can help me. I have recently found this sentence "improving safety should not be considered merely a law obligation, but also a concrete economic opportunity". I was wondering if the ...
68
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7answers
13k views

“It really doesn't matter” v “It doesn't really matter”

I can't distinguish the difference in meaning between these two sentences. It really doesn't matter. It doesn't really matter. It seems that there is a nuanced difference, but I ...
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2answers
31 views

Position of manner adverbs within verb phrases

I have found the following sentence in a book: A firm's sensory marketing approach should be deliberately and strategically based on the five human senses. I have a feeling that the adverbial ...
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1answer
1k views

“may even have” or “may have even”?

Is either of these 'more correct'? She may even have pre-empted us. She may have even pre-empted us. Is it purely a case of which sounds better in any case, or are there specific rules?
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1answer
1k views

Do you put a comma around “as well”

Would I write, "He, as well, no longer held the need to impress her" or "He as well no longer held the need to impress her"? Which is grammatically correct?
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2answers
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“early in the morning” and “ in the early morning”

Is there any difference between the two phrases ? 1) There are numerous health benefits of drinking water on an empty stomach in the early morning. 2) There are numerous health benefits of drinking ...
0
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1answer
112 views

Using 'caveat' as adverb to introduce a sentence

I would like to use caveat to introduce a sentence where I specify important information. For example: You can wash mostly anything in this washing machine. Caveat, if you wash wool set the ...
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1answer
2k views

“commonly known as” or “known commonly as”?

I'm editing a scientific paper, and one of my colleague wrote: "...in applications known commonly as 'displays',..." Personally, I would change it to "commonly known", but I didn't find any formal ...
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3answers
41k views

Adverb position: 'I have also been working" or 'I have been also working'?

I doubt about the place of the adverb 'also' in the following sentence: 'I work at the hospital, and for three years I have also been working for my PhD at the University.' Should I say: 'I have been ...
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1answer
43 views

Correct position of adverb “persistently” in verb phrase “act on it”?

What's the correct position of the adverb "persistently" in the verb phrase "act on it"? Should it be persistently act on it or act on it persistently? Thanks
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1answer
549 views

-ly adverb placement: “primarily consisted of [noun]” or “consisted primarily of [noun]”

I'm troubled by "primarily consisted of" versus "consisted primarily of." To me, the former seems clumsy, and the latter seems smoother. I'm American and live in the mid-west. Is the second ...
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1answer
675 views

“I want to apologize personally for…” or “I want to personally apologize for…” [closed]

The latter seems to have a more standard structure, but the first one sounds better to me. Which one is grammatically correct?
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1answer
152 views

Where is it best to put the “when” of a sentence?

John yesterday went to the store to buy eggs. John went to the store yesterday to buy eggs. John went to the store to buy eggs yesterday.
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2answers
2k views

Is the sentence *I had my skills improved considerably* correct?

Could you please explain to me if the following sentence is correct? Does it sound good? Your training was very useful for me. I had my skills improved considerably. Or I must use something like: ...
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1answer
2k views

“Eternally grateful” or “Grateful eternally”?

Which statement is preferable: “I am eternally grateful” or “I am grateful eternally”?
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4answers
597 views

enough better, better enough, sufficiently better, sufficiently well, or well enough?

Someone asked about using "enough" in front of a comparative adjective e.g. "he felt enough better to go back to work." A lively discussion ensued between the BrE and AmE contingents about whether a) ...
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1answer
1k views

“… respectively are …” vs “… are respectively …”

I would use respectively in either one of the following ways: "Figures 1 to 3 are respectively front, top and bottom views of the object", "Figures 1 to 3 are front, top and bottom views of ...
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2answers
396 views

Afoot instead of “on foot” [closed]

Can I use "afoot" instead of "on foot" in the sentence below ? I will go to market on foot. Regards
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2answers
110 views

Word order in a conditional sentence

Are both acceptable? Or is only one correct? He would never have said anything rude or insulting like that. or He would have never said anything rude or insulting like that.