Skip to main content

Questions tagged [adjectives]

Adjectives are just one of several different types of noun modifiers, typically used to premodify or describe a noun. Do not confuse adjectives with nouns used attributively to modify other nouns. Adjectives have comparative and superlative degrees, can be used as predicate adjectives in copulae, and can themselves be modified by intensifiers and adverbs but not by other adjectives. Nouns in attribution fail all those tests.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
2 votes
3 answers
109 views

Such + adj. only: Is that acceptable usage? Or should I use "so" only in these cases?

For the word "such", most sources say that it should be followed by a noun (phrase) but mention nothing about "such" + adj. e.g. Such confident of him! But can he pull that off? ...
nayfaan's user avatar
  • 138
-1 votes
1 answer
98 views

Adjective that explains a variable (e.g. curve in a diagram) is growing slightly exponential

I am writing some sentences describing the diagram below. From my perspective, the GDP resembles a bit like a curve (exponentially growing) rather than roughly a straight line. Is there a particular ...
Redsbefall's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
89 views

Nominalized adjectives or nominalized adjective phrases?

Numerous adjectives can be combined with the. Examples include the poor, the limitless, the miraculous, etc. Such constructions are semantically equivalent to nouns. According to Wikipedia: A ...
radomness's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
355 views

Can the word "incredulous" be used to describe an unbelievable idea, instead of an unbelieving person?

The word incredulous is usually used to describe a person's unwillingness/inability to believe. But I would also like to use it to describe an idea's inability to be believed. For example, instead of ...
D.R's user avatar
  • 113
2 votes
0 answers
45 views

Do the adverb and adjective together modify the noun? [closed]

The really good golfer is playing well. I know really modifies good and good modifies golfer, but does the full phrase really good modify golfer? The really big house is for sale. Does the phrase ...
Randy's user avatar
  • 21
-1 votes
2 answers
214 views

Confused about compound nouns vs. adjectives

I was taught that "ball-point pen" = compound noun, but "ball-point" is NOT an adjective because it doesn't pass the primary tests for an adjective (has adjective-making morpheme, ...
Dee's user avatar
  • 97
0 votes
1 answer
73 views

adjective vs adverb for a gerund

This sentence occurs in Wikipedia: The method of voting can range from formal submission of written votes, through show of hands, voice voting or audience response systems, to informal noting which ...
Anton Sherwood's user avatar
8 votes
7 answers
3k views

Is there a term that describes reducing a person's identity to certain characteristics?

Is there a term that describes reducing a person's identity to certain characteristics, behaviours or traits that are not physical? The term should have a negative connotation. I've heard the ...
Maria CW's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
37 views

"one/two/three-car households" vs "single/dual/triple-car households" (attributive forms)

Which way is more natural when it comes to numbers of things that people have or own? For example, the numbers of cars owned by households: The rate of single/dual/triple-car households is increasing....
Vun-Hugh Vaw's user avatar
  • 5,401
0 votes
1 answer
54 views

Adjective for the name 'Grothendieck'

Grothendieck was a major mathematician in the 20th century. I would like to know how one can use his name to talk about the content of a study. For example in French we would say Hi all, Études ...
Jonathan's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
453 views

What are some pro-adjectives?

What are some pro-adjectives? That is, a pro-form that can substitute (satisfy the substitution test with) an adjectival phrase? A Google search brought up "such", but was otherwise ...
user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
114 views

What's the adjective for "register" in the linguistic sense?

What's the adjective for register in the linguistic sense (formal, informal, frozen, etc.)? There is a ___________ difference between "how do you do" and "howdy". I thought up ...
Vun-Hugh Vaw's user avatar
  • 5,401
7 votes
3 answers
3k views

Is "inauthentic" inauthentic?

"Inauthentic" is more commonly used than "unauthentic", at least these days, but they are both valid. Several sources (World Wide Words for example) suggest what prefix the ...
desmo's user avatar
  • 649
12 votes
7 answers
5k views

What's a good word to describe someone who is prone to sudden changes of mood? [closed]

I'm looking for an adjective, preferably a kind of "fancy" one that I can use to describe a character who has frequent changes of mood, often in a very sudden or extreme way. It also causes ...
Sandy's user avatar
  • 123
13 votes
10 answers
3k views

Is post-hyphenation necessary in "I am a child and adult psychologist..."?

I am editing a bio for a non-writer who has written: "I am a child and adult psychologist..." This is awkward... it sounds like he's a child. How do I remedy this? Is it something like: &...
Wed's user avatar
  • 155
1 vote
2 answers
90 views

What is the usage of adjectives directly after a non-copular verb (phrase) called?

Sometimes adjectives can be placed directly after a non-copular verb or verb phrase: We would swim naked every day. They got married young. He walked barefoot on the still charring coal. In these ...
Vun-Hugh Vaw's user avatar
  • 5,401
0 votes
0 answers
46 views

Is the adverb 'just in time' still used adverbially when used in the sentence, "He is just in time?"

Can this phrase ever be used adjectivally other than in a hyphenated way such as,'a just-in-time system'? (I ask because in another language which I am learning, "He came just in time." is ...
user avatar
-3 votes
1 answer
95 views

How do I express the quality of being alien as a noun? [duplicate]

Alien can be a noun and an adjective. In this case, I am using it as an adjective. I am wondering how to express the quality of being alien as a noun (for example, happy expressed as a noun is ...
The Empty String Photographer's user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
127 views

Why do we say 'Harry Potter fan' but 'Harry Potter's biggest fan'

In the following constructions, why do we use an 's on the second option but not on the first one? Harry Potter fan Harry Potter's biggest fan I cannot find any explanation for this anywhere online....
Patricia Fagundes's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
564 views

Is "I wanted to have written something more round" correct? Or do I have to use "rounder"? Or is only well-rounded is acceptable?

Is "I wanted to have written something more round" correct? Or do I have to use "rounder"? I think that I hear more people saying "This should be more round", than "...
Homero Esmeraldo's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
62 views

Is "shaping" an adjective in "has been truly shaping for"? [closed]

I'm writing this sentence: Five years at X has been truly shaping for my professional life and development. Is "shaping" here used correctly as an adjective?
Kelly's user avatar
  • 11
8 votes
6 answers
2k views

In the sentence, "They went to bed hungry," what type of adjective is "hungry?" [duplicate]

This question arises from a mistake I made in class. I incorrectly identified hungry as an adverb in the sentence below. I appreciate your wisdom. Question: In the sentence, "They went to bed ...
Jonathan Kolker's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
74 views

Passive or Adjective 'respected' [closed]

Is the following sentence passive or is 'respected' used an adjective?: He is respected. And how would one know the difference?
Lab coat's user avatar
  • 131
5 votes
2 answers
263 views

"China balloon" vs "Chinese balloon"?

Is the phrase "China balloon" grammatically correct? I was under the impression that it must be "Chinese balloon", but I see the former used in mainstream news such as the ...
vartec's user avatar
  • 1,134
0 votes
1 answer
100 views

Can I describe myself as "self-teaching" instead of "self-taught"?

I am learning sculpting by myself and this is an ongoing process. So, I'm going to describe myself as a "self-teaching" rather than a "self-taught" sculptor, since it seems to me ...
N.S.'s user avatar
  • 101
2 votes
1 answer
83 views

Is 'kickoff' an adjective?

It seems like 'kickoff' should be able to function as an adjective, like in the following sentence: The kick-off event was a 90-minute lecture by Bill Gates. However, I can't find any dictionaries ...
Carly Forsaith's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
49 views

Is there an adjective to describe an action that's done to fake being carefree?

I've thought about using nonchalant, insouciant, carefree, blithe, and so on, but they don't really communicate that the character does actually care about what they're doing, they're just pretending ...
Rosy's user avatar
  • 106
1 vote
1 answer
90 views

How confident is confident? [closed]

I'd always thought that "sure" and "certain" were close to synonymous, both meaning absence of doubt (with "certain" in a slightly higher register, and maybe a bit ...
Jay's user avatar
  • 81
26 votes
21 answers
11k views

What's a word that means "once rich but now poor"?

I'm looking for a one-to-two word adjective that describes a person that was once rich, but after several unfortunate events has much less money. However, the person is not suffering, but the person ...
Anon's user avatar
  • 277
0 votes
1 answer
76 views

Do 'exogenous' and 'exogenetic' mean the same thing?

IMF managing director Kristalina Georgieva used a word I had never heard before when she stated, of the UK : The announced fiscal plan navigates well the difficult tradeoff between fighting inflation ...
Nigel J's user avatar
  • 24.8k
0 votes
0 answers
24 views

Is there an adjective for a word that contains multiple connotations as implied by its contextual usage? [duplicate]

I recognized in the process of writing this clause, Resulting in the discretion of death as we know it That the “discretion of death” could encompass a range of semantic vectors depending on how one ...
Auri's user avatar
  • 1
-1 votes
3 answers
141 views

Is there an English word to define someone who qualifies their knowledge by (family) association?

I know someone who consistently refers to the fact that their aunt/brother-in-law/cousin or someone in his family has the highest level of expertise to validate his comments to have the highest value. ...
Jessica Ortiz's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
63 views

Why are English tense names backward (adjective after noun)? [duplicate]

The adjectives in English tense names to often be postpositive adjective: present continuous/progressive/perfect(ive). Simple is used rather sloppily by different authorities, varying in either being ...
Vun-Hugh Vaw's user avatar
  • 5,401
-2 votes
1 answer
43 views

Am I using the adjective correctly in 'an opportunity to contribute to something meaningful'?

My genuine, honest intentions are to live up to being the "go-to" person for all tasks related to certain datasets, especially when the information will, in some way, relate to all my direct ...
Antonio's user avatar
  • 103
-1 votes
1 answer
25 views

Am I appropriately using dashes?

"I’m confident I’d excel in the position due to my prior experience and my involvement in extracurriculars-- learning to communicate with people from a variety of backgrounds and understanding ...
Antonio's user avatar
  • 103
2 votes
3 answers
209 views

"than it's worth" adjective or noun

It's more headache than it's worth. It's more trouble than it's worth. Is this "worth" adjective or noun? I think the adjective "worth" needs an object after it. However, there is ...
Ran's user avatar
  • 21
1 vote
2 answers
130 views

Can abstract concepts have different meanings?

I was reading a blog about what abstract ideas are. In one part of the blog, it mentions: Another way to think of abstract thinking is to look at broad concepts that may have different meanings to ...
Kapoa's user avatar
  • 11
-1 votes
1 answer
47 views

Can anyone help me identifying the type of adjective in the following sentence? [closed]

"He is a beautiful boy." I know that if an adjective is used before the noun, it is known as attributive, but here he is a pronoun and the adjective is used after the verb is. It's a little ...
user469769's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
220 views

What's an adjective or noun that means "about the meaning of life and purpose"?

What's an adjective or noun that means "about the meaning of life and purpose"? Nihilism is the belief that life is meaningless, so we shouldn't have to burden ourselves with purpose. ...
minseong's user avatar
  • 3,526
2 votes
3 answers
205 views

How to use conjunction or punctuation for two or three adjectives next to each other?

I have been reading on ordering of multiple adjectives. I understand that when there are multiple adjectives they are usually arranged in a certain order (opinion, size, quantity, etc.). For example: ...
Lone Learner's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
359 views

"They also need the Poland international striker to help sell shirts and add appeal for potential future sponsorship deals." -- why "Poland"?

"... Robert Lewandowski (238 goals in eight Bundesliga seasons) to replace Messi's goals, they also need the Poland international striker to help sell shirts and add appeal for potential future ...
ASDASD ASDASD's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
101 views

Word for "multi-influenced"

I am looking for a word to describe a phenomenon that has multiple influences. For example, a disease that has many risk factors. It can be used in a sentence such as: Although the disease is likely {...
Brigadeiro's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
145 views

Another word for 'one-of-a-kind' [closed]

I'm looking for a specific adjective for a product (meaning something created by a human and not naturally occurring) where there is only one unit ever produced. Similar meaning to bespoke but that ...
Vikesh's user avatar
  • 27
-2 votes
2 answers
41 views

“Ought-is misstatements” [closed]

The Ought-is fallacy is when one assumes that what he/she wishes for is true. Is it correct to use ‘ought-is’ as an adjective and say the following sentence: they do not know their handbook, except ...
mueen khurshid's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
56 views

Adjective for 'big business'

I'm looking for an adjective that means 'pertaining/relating to big businesses'. Currently I'm thinking of using 'big-business/large-business' as an adjective, but I'm not sure if that's accepted. ...
Erroneous's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
184 views

Adjective to describe period before creation

Especially in the context of history or Bible studies, we see the term "antediluvean" to describe the period of time before the "great flood." I'm basically searching for a ...
Arash Howaida's user avatar
28 votes
23 answers
7k views

What is the word for a belief that is nearly universally rejected?

There is no significant debate over whether or not theft should be legal. There are not pro-theft and anti-theft political groups; basically everyone agrees theft is bad, so that precludes the ...
Someone's user avatar
  • 770
1 vote
2 answers
107 views

Why do hotel names often break the “adjective-first” rule?

In English, we generally say the adjective first, then the noun it describes. Many or most hotel names, however, are called “hotel” then followed by an adjective. Such as “Hotel Hayden” and “Hotel ...
Charles Nicholson's user avatar
4 votes
3 answers
307 views

What is an adjective or phrase to qualify a small number of something but that is important?

I'm trying to find an adjective or a periphrasis to qualify a substance that can be found in small quantities but that is here whatever, and has a important effect on the system where it can be found. ...
sol's user avatar
  • 143
1 vote
1 answer
86 views

"Performative" meaning "in name only"

Recently I'm seeing the word "performative" being used with the meaning "in name only". I'm seeing it only on Reddit, so it could be a local phenomenon. Examples: The separate ...
angus's user avatar
  • 113

1 2
3
4 5
82