Questions tagged [accent]

Pronunciation characteristics of a certain individual, location, or nation. Generally does NOT include learning to speak with various accents or identifying accents.

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59 views

Where is this accent from?

Where does the accent used by the actor who plays Mazikeen in the Lucifer series belong to? I can tell it is American, but I don't know what region in there. Here is a scene from the series where she ...
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Is there any well-known British accent which aʊ is pronounced like əʊ in?

I think I've heard the word "about" pronounced with əʊ (as in "Poland"). Is it just me or there's indeed such an accent in Great Britain or, more specifically, in England?
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“Tizzarget Acquizzired”; What's the deal with the Z's when imitating divers?

When imitating scuba divers, especially "old-timey" ones, extra Z's or "izz"es get added to the middle of words. What is the origin of this? I have heard this in a few older shows, including the ...
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Is there a word that has the same -er sound pronunciation in all both British and American accents

Most words with -er ending, sound different in British and American accent. In British it’s “a”, in American it’s “e”(don’t know how to correctly write transcription ). But is there word, that has ...
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What accent did 'kewl' (cool) originate from

I've been hearing 'kewl' for a long time excessively on social media (mostly used by Americans). I wondered what accent it came from. I searched, but only found the following information about it: ...
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Can there be a circonflex on a “w” in Welsh? [closed]

Consider the page Wrexham Glyndŵr University. Why is there a circonflex on the w? Does this exist in Welsh spelling?
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What is it called when people who speak with a Connecticut accent cut off “t”s at the end of words or skip them in the middle of words?

Many people raised in the US state of Connecticut have a distinctive accent that I have never heard anywhere else in New England. They cut off their "t"s when they pronounce certain words. One place ...
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Am I imagining the Warshington (Washington) accent?

So my wife grew up around Vancouver, Washington, USA. Every once in a while she will say words in peculiar ways that I have jokingly taken to call her "Warshington accent" because it makes the ...
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What accent is 'noice'?

Recently, and for me beginning with the series Brooklyn 99, I have been hearing "noice" used for what I guess is an extreme "nice". I was assuming this was just a mocking of Brooklynese (e.g. "toity ...
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Liverpudlian Accents and The Beatles

The Beatles all have/had a Liverpudlian accent, but it wasn't very strong, especially if you compare it to the accents of Merseyside personalities from similar backgrounds (such as Steven Gerrard, ...
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787 views

What dialect/accent in the UK do people not say the word “the”

I know a decent amount about different dialects in the UK, and usually recognize and identify them, but I heard one today that took me by surprise. I was watching a TV show, and this family, who I ...
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What kind of accent is this one (possibly from Kentucky)?

Is this one of regional accent in the USA or simply a defect in speech? If it's a regional accent, is it a typical Kentucky accent? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1oKlERHhPt0&t=490s
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Why do some speakers pronounce the aɪ sound as ɔɪ?

Essentially, I'm referring to how some British English speakers pronounce words like "time", "right". That first vowel changes and ends up sounding like "toyme" or "royght". Americans seem to have ...
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accent mark question about american names [closed]

ok what accent mark should be on the name chloe for an american, e, è, é, ê, ë? I am an argument with a peer and would like some outside opinions. Please help
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What accent does David Gower speak with?

According to this meta post accent questions, especially those that are well researched and about real-life public figures are on topic. I'm just curious as to what accent the English cricket ...
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Daniel Craig's accent in Knives Out trailer (Southern, RP, different?)

What is his accent in this trailer? https://youtu.be/sL-9Khv7wa4?t=71 https://youtu.be/sL-9Khv7wa4?t=86 Would you call it Southern? I'd say it's a mix of RP and Southern at best. He seems to have ...
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108 views

Texans speaking with a slurring “s”?

Some Texans speak with slurring "s" sounds, sometimes making a soft rasp or even a "sh" sound? example "Shtudent" instead of "student". Is this traditional or a new affectation?
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Cockney accent: “a” or “an” before words starting with h? How about “the”?

How do you say "a help" (or the indefinite article followed by another word that starts with a normally non-silent h) with a Cockney accent, which drops word-initial h's? So would you say a elp or an ...
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Grammatical/Semantic basis for the phrase “what with”

Example: We are changing all the vehicles in the fleet, what with the new regulations and all... How did that what sneak in there? What is it doing? (*) Edit: will award bounty to Talies after ...
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Are regional accents disappearing?

Maybe this fits better on Skeptics @ SE? There is an idea that is frequently seen that states that regional accents are disappearing: Regional accents are disappearing: which do you want to save? ...
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Final /s/ vs /z/ sound at the end of verbs/nouns issue [duplicate]

So, I've seen this rule at several English books about how if a word has a voiced final sound (e.g. r, voiced th, l, m, n..) then added 's' is pronounced more like /z/. If the final sound is voiceless ...
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how do you pronounce a rolling “o” as in “so” or “no”?

I noticed that in New Zealand most people pronounce "o" at the end of "no" or "so" in a rather rolled manner - something closer to [our] instead of simple [ou]. For example, lady in this video does ...
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How and why do accents change through the years?

Oh how I love the voices and accents of old-time radio or movies from Hollywood. The american accents seem to change quite a bit in merely 50 years or so. It's personal opinion for sure but I do ...
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Pronunciation of “inquiry” with first syllable stress?

I am an American and I always pronounce “inquiry” with second syllable stress. After hearing more and more Americans say it with first syllable stres, along with British people saying it the way I do,...
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1answer
126 views

nonclassical vs. non-classical

I've seen both spellings many times, i.e. on Wikipedia, Dictionary.com and dozens of papers. I was wondering if there is a difference between US, Canadian, Australian and British spelling or if you ...
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British South Asian accent

This is a two-part question. A lot of British South Asian that are born and bred in the UK have a peculiar accent. It's very different than the familiar Indian accent too. So my question is... Is ...
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1answer
439 views

How do you pronounce the word “array” in Australian English?

I am learning accents (differences in pronunciation), and I was wondering how to pronounce the word "array" in Australian English, and how it's pronounced in other variants of the language. Is it AH-...
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Looking for Samples of Canadian West Coast Accent [closed]

If this is not the right place to ask, then feel free to redirect me to a more appropriate site. A long time ago I learned English in British Columbia and adopted the local accent. Since I am ...
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106 views

Why do native English speakers tend to have an easier time replicating English accents not their own?

Native English speakers are often able to go back and forth between various English accents with relative ease. This is often done in comedy. Non-Native speakers usually can't do this. What's the ...
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Are there American English dialects which distinguish /ɑ/ and /ɒ/ but not /ɑ/ and /ɔ/?

I relied on the Logic of English (LoE) phonograms to give myself a better understanding of English pronunciation since the spelling gives me a hard time (even as native speaker), but I noticed that ...
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Accented syllable after a glottal stop in NA English

Does anyone know of any studies on the change in use of accenting after a glottal stop? I am in my late 40s, and first heard this maybe 10 years ago used by an adult. I have a nephew who is 11, and it ...
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What accent is this?

I came across a song performed by Daniel Kahn, and I really liked his pronunciation. They say he comes from Detroit. Is this a typical accent for that region? Or is he doing something else?
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What kind of British English accent is it?

I'd like to ask what kind of accent it is. Is it Geordie of British English? Please refer to this video hyperlink: a British English accent.
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Is there a name for this articulate, hyper-enunciated, “upper class” American English accent?

In the television show Frasier, the protagonist's brother, Niles Crane, is a haughty, snobby, obsessive-compulsive psychiatrist who frequently obsesses about knowing the right people and climbing the ...
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/z/ + /ð/ = /zdð/?

I was wondering what exactly happens when the common English speaker* pronounces /z/ and /ð/ right after, for example , the word - combo "is this ...". Honestly, for me it's almost impossible to ...
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Should “ate” and “eight” be pronounced exactly alike?

Is pronouncing "ate" and "eight" differently wrong? When I say "ate" it sounds like "ate" itself and when I say "eight" it sounds like "ey-ht" is that a wrong pronunciation? I understand ...
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Does “nonstandard English” come across as judgmental in the following context?

I am looking for an alternative to the word nonstandard (if necessary). I used the word in my answer to a question at Academia SE. Let me first lay out the context. The question I was offering an ...
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What type of English accent is this?

I came across these adverts: EPO 2013 EPO 2014 on TV a few years back and was curious as to what type of accent the speaker has. I've been told by a linguistic professor who is English that it is a '...
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American pronunciation of “with”

What is the most common American way of pronouncing "with"? I'm asking specifically about "th" combinations - dictionaries give both the unvoiced (wɪθ) and the voiced (wɪð) ones? Personally, I've ...
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Is there a name for the tone of voice that modern British newsreaders use when announcing serious subjects?

This question stems from pure idle curiosity. It seems to me that British newsreaders use a special accent, especially when reading out the headlines or introducing a particularly serious story. ...
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Does word pronunciation change when it's in a sentence?

I’m Chinese and am learning English. When I watch video materials from US and UK, I've noticed a phenomenon: in British, a word may sound much different when it's said in a sentence compared to when ...
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Why does the dictionary give the pronunciation of the word “of” as '\əv' with a 'v' sound when in some cases it's pronounced with 'f' sound?

"of" seems to be pronounced with the f sound asˈäf in phrases like "of course". But 'of' is pronounced as \əv in a lot of other cases. Yet, Merriam Websters gives the one with 'v' sound as the only ...
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“Both” or “bolth” [closed]

Should I use "both" or "bolth"? I have seen bo(l?)th words used and bo(l?)th are mentioned in various sources, but "both" seems to be more common. A Google search turned up bo(l?)th a Yahoo Answers ...
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Does this mixture between pronunciations have a name?

If a person pronounces a word with the sound /ɒ/, for example not, but says /kɑr/ instead of /kɑː/, does this mixture receive a name?
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Did the non-standard pronunciation of “gold” as “goold” come from an Old English sound change?

John Walker in his Critical Pronunciation Dictionary (1791) transcribes the pronunciation of the word “gold” as go¹ld, or go²o²ld which in modern transcription equates to /goʊld/ or /guːld/. He ...
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Are there different pronunciations of 'cucumber'?

I think the word cucumber is pronounced as if you would say 'car' without the 'r' and then 'cumber'. However, many people I know say it in a way that sounds like 'queue' and then 'cumber'. Are ...
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Which American accent is this?

(Originally posted to travel.stackexchange.com) A common theme I've noticed in many "big-beat" songs and the electronic genre, especially songs by British artists, is to use voice-samples of a ...
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pronouncing foreigner's names [duplicate]

I want to ask you if there's some special rule about pronouncing foreign names with or without accent. For example, can I say Fedor or Andrey in native russian manner and with russian accent or should ...
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What is the meaning and etymology of “cod-French” accent?

Here's a passage referring to re-enactments of the Battle of Hastings: As you might expect, the English king, Harold Godwinson, comes across as an essentially decent chap, albeit weary and ...
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Is there a way to phonetically write English so that when read it is with a “British accent”? [closed]

I am going to be performing a monologue which will mostly be in a southern accent, but there is one brief part, where I quote a British person, and would like to give it a general British accent. Is ...