Questions tagged [absolute-constructions]

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Is 'being' omitted in certain participle clauses and absolute constructions?

In literature (particularly fiction), there will often be examples of supplementary adjectives and absolute constructions in which a participle isn't present. My question boils down to how we analyse ...
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0answers
31 views

participle clauses/absolute phrases

Being tired, I got some rest at home. Tired, I got some rest at home. Rich, he wasn't happy. Why are the sentences above correct, but these aren't? Sick, he couldn't attend the meeting. Old, he ...
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1answer
50 views

“Based on” X, we can say Y?

Based on the evidence available, I’m not sure I can conclude anything. We often say that X is based on Y to mean X is grounded in, or adapted from, Y. But can we use it as above as if it were a sort ...
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1answer
91 views

What kind of sentence is this? (Sentence structure) - 3

But it is just two lovers, holding hands and in a hurry to reach their car, their locked hands a starfish leaping through the dark. A sentence by John Updike. I've never seen a lot of sentences like ...
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20 views

Mention the first immediate action in an '-ing' clause in front of the main clause

Page 585 of the Collins English Usage reads To indicate that someone did one thing immediately after another, you can mention the first thing they did in an '-ing' clause in front of the main clause. ...
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1answer
45 views

Changing clause of condition to absolute phrase and participle w

1a. When I have money I will buy a car. 2a. If my parents allow I'll go abroad. Can these sentence be changed into a absolute participle phrase? For example 1b. Having money, I'll buy a car. 2b. ...
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0answers
35 views

comma before "with"

The following text is a partial transcription of Steve Jobs’s June 6 keynote address at the 2011 Apple Worldwide Developer’s Conference (WWDC), with a specific focus on Jobs’s remarks on the iCloud. ...
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2answers
407 views

verb-ing modifier trouble

I'm unexplainably confused about this topic. What does the following verb-ing clause modify? (noun) researchers or (action) have sent? How do we decide that? --> very important for me Is there any ...
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1answer
86 views

Why doesn’t the sentence "the standard of proof being one based on balance of probabilities" contain a verb?

The burden of proof is easier to discharge in a civil cases than in a criminal case, the standard of proof being one based on balance of probabilities. Why there is no verb in the latter sentence? Is ...
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1answer
63 views

Is this participle clause sentence correct? [closed]

How do you think about this sentence? Is it ok grammatically? Having been in shape, I go to gym twice a week. `
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1answer
183 views

What are typical "emotional absolutes" and why we should avoid them in academic writing?

I am working on a revision of an academic research paper. We performed some empirical studies and wrote a paper to demystify some common misunderstanding of certain techniques. One reviewer gave me ...
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2answers
116 views

What's the underlying grammatical structure of this sentence with three instances of "it" and two of "being"?

I just encountered the following sentence in The Oxford Guide to Style (p. 161) and could not figure out its structure: Since it⁽¹⁾ is being presented as a direct quotation it⁽²⁾ is treated as one, ...
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43 views

Is there a name other than "absolute" for this kind of construction?

In some languages there are absolute constructions like the Genitive Absolute in Greek: Καὶ ἤδη ὥρας πολλῆς γενομένης προσελθόντες αὐτῷ οἱ μαθηταὶ αὐτοῦ ἔλεγον ὅτι ἔρημός ἐστιν ὁ τόπος καὶ ἤδη ὥρα ...
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2answers
1k views

Examples of absolute phrases with adverbs instead of participles

I'm looking for examples / explanation of absolute phrases with adverbs instead of participles. What about the following: She walked into the room, gracefully. Is the adverb, gracefully, an ...
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2answers
73 views

What kind of phrase is "...better at finding patterns of burglary than of, say, murder"?

Predictive-policing systems are imperfect, better at finding patterns of burglary than of, say, murder. I know that "better at finding patterns of burglary than of, say, murder." is describing ...
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2answers
229 views

How well does this sentence structure work?

I'm proofreading someone else's video game script, and I'm having a bit of trouble with her use of absolute phrases. She likes using absolute phrases in her sentence structures, like so: My fingers ...
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1answer
358 views

Is "needless to say" an absolute phrase? [closed]

Would the phrase "needless to say" be an absolute phrase (adverbial phrase that modifies the entire clause after it)? "Needless to say, I was super happy."
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1answer
125 views

Does this sentence use a nominative absolute phrase?

Does the following sentence end with a nominative absolute? The term was coined nearly 40 years ago by a prominent cardiologist, who noticed that all of his heart disease patients had common ...
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1answer
79 views

Is this Clause or falls under some other category

a finding that has shocked most observers. Full sentence: studies have shown that X is 60 percent of Y, a finding that has shocked most observers. What is your opinion. Isn't it that the above is a ...
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"Being [he/him] is not easy." Which is prescriptively "correct"?

"It is I" follows a well-known prescriptivist rule This question is about prescriptive grammar. It’s a fairly well-known prescriptivist rule that “me, him, her, them” (in other words, pronouns in the ...
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1answer
96 views

Which types of clause can be defined as absolute clause?

I scooped her up. Her belly fit snugly into my palm ; a low continual grunting pulsed through her body . These sentences have been recited from the following link: https://www.washingtonpost.com/...