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Questions tagged [absolute]

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3
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1answer
27 views

Is there a name other than “absolute” for this kind of construction?

In some languages there are absolute constructions like the Genitive Absolute in Greek: Καὶ ἤδη ὥρας πολλῆς γενομένης προσελθόντες αὐτῷ οἱ μαθηταὶ αὐτοῦ ἔλεγον ὅτι ἔρημός ἐστιν ὁ τόπος καὶ ἤδη ὥρα ...
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2answers
220 views

Examples of absolute phrases with adverbs instead of participles

I'm looking for examples / explanation of absolute phrases with adverbs instead of participles. What about the following: She walked into the room, gracefully. Is the adverb, gracefully, an ...
-1
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2answers
68 views

What kind of phrase is “…better at finding patterns of burglary than of, say, murder”?

Predictive-policing systems are imperfect, better at finding patterns of burglary than of, say, murder. I know that "better at finding patterns of burglary than of, say, murder." is describing ...
1
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0answers
94 views

When do absolute phrases lack a noun?

When do absolute phrases lack a noun? absolute phrases are a noun + a modifier, although it is possible to use only a modifier. When can a modifier, e.g. a participle, be used in an absolute ...
1
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2answers
190 views

How well does this sentence structure work?

I'm proofreading someone else's video game script, and I'm having a bit of trouble with her use of absolute phrases. She likes using absolute phrases in her sentence structures, like so: My fingers ...
-2
votes
1answer
211 views

Is “needless to say” an absolute phrase? [closed]

Would the phrase "needless to say" be an absolute phrase (adverbial phrase that modifies the entire clause after it)? "Needless to say, I was super happy."
0
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1answer
98 views

Does this sentence use a nominative absolute phrase?

Does the following sentence end with a nominative absolute? The term was coined nearly 40 years ago by a prominent cardiologist, who noticed that all of his heart disease patients had common ...
0
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1answer
69 views

Is this Clause or falls under some other category

a finding that has shocked most observers. Full sentence: studies have shown that X is 60 percent of Y, a finding that has shocked most observers. What is your opinion. Isn't it that the above is a ...
8
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3answers
2k views

“Being [he/him] is not easy.” Which is prescriptively “correct”?

"It is I" follows a well-known prescriptivist rule This question is about prescriptive grammar. It’s a fairly well-known prescriptivist rule that “me, him, her, them” (in other words, pronouns in the ...
0
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1answer
79 views

Which types of clause can be defined as absolute clause?

I scooped her up. Her belly fit snugly into my palm ; a low continual grunting pulsed through her body . These sentences have been recited from the following link: https://www.washingtonpost.com/...