Linked Questions

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1answer
107 views

Position of Adverb 'gladly' [duplicate]

Five sentences with slight adjustment in the position of the adverb: Gladly I would've come. I would have come gladly. I would gladly have come. I gladly would have come. I would have gladly come. ...
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1answer
91 views

Regarding Adverb's position [duplicate]

The business was registered officially. or The business was officially registered. Where to place the word 'officially'?
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0answers
54 views

Question about adverb placement in these sentences [duplicate]

I'm confused about the adverb placement. I heard that adverbs that indicate manner should be placed at the end of a sentence, but I have seen many sentences that do not follow this rule. For some ...
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0answers
43 views

Placement of adverb relative to verb [duplicate]

What is the preferred choice below? A) "The order was unexpectedly cancelled." B) "The order was cancelled unexpectedly." I am guessing "cancelled" is a verb and "unexpectedly" is an adverb. (...
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0answers
31 views

Where should an adverb come in a sentence? [duplicate]

If both of the sentences below are correct, does the position of the adverb change the meaning (slightly), or perhaps the register of the sentence? The superior man thinks always of virtue. ...
0
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0answers
29 views

She acted as though she was subtle. She never was subtle. Or: She was never subtle [duplicate]

She acted as though she was subtle. Then: 1 She never was subtle 2 She was never subtle The first one sounds right to me although the second one seems to be the grammatically correct one? Or are both ...
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0answers
25 views

Should I use "you will again be given" or "you will be again given"? [duplicate]

I'm describing a situation which is similar to the situation in the previous paragraph, which of the following alternatives are more correct? In general, is there a rule for this? "You will again be ...
-1
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4answers
22k views

Put the words in the correct order to make question [closed]

I am not a native speaker. I am doing the exercise "Put the words in the correct order to make question" from my workbook. I have this set of words: your / best / see / did / friend / when / last ...
5
votes
3answers
4k views

Auxiliary verb and adverb ordering

(I'm not really sure if the title is a correct definition of my problem at all) I'm not a native English speaker, and I'm used to say: Spaghetti suddenly can talk But I've seen a phrase from a ...
2
votes
2answers
5k views

Where should "a lot" be placed in a sentence?

Which of these is right? I like to play with my dog a lot. I like a lot to play with my dog. I like to play a lot with my dog. Any of the above. I mean, where does a lot go in there? I searched but ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

Where to position "never" in a sentence?

The following is a quote from Mr. Trump's statement. Is it grammatical to say "We should have never been in Iraq"? Shouldn't it be "We should never have been in Iraq"? "We should have never been in ...
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2answers
320 views

Placing "first" in a sentence; would it change the meaning?

How does the meaning of the following two sentences differ? I first wanted to tell you about it. I wanted to tell you about it first.
1
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1answer
59 views

Word order "I always should test..." vs "I should always test..."

As a non-native English speaker I am not sure about the word order in sentences with adverbs when used in the "in-between scenario" (according to https://english.stackexchange.com/a/9602/...
1
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0answers
30 views

Adverb and verb position [duplicate]

I want you to clearly understand that excuses will not do. I want you to understand clearly that excuses will not do. My book says that second sentence is correct. What is the logic behind it?

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