Linked Questions

9
votes
3answers
41k views

should be always or should always be? [duplicate]

I am not a native speaker, I do not know how to say this properly: "It should be always on", or "It should always be on"? Is there any difference?
4
votes
1answer
14k views

Adverb position in perfect tenses [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Are there any rules on the positioning adverbs should take in a sentence? My question concerns the adverb position in perfect tenses. For example look at these sentences: Your ...
1
vote
2answers
18k views

"Therefore I" or "I therefore" [duplicate]

I would like to understand the nuances. What is the correct way to use: "Therefore, I …" or "I, therefore …"
1
vote
1answer
20k views

Correct use of "immediately" [duplicate]

I have two variants of one sentence and I want to find out which of them is correct and why: So you'll see immediately the notification when the crucial for you information changes. So you’ll ...
0
votes
1answer
6k views

Can be potentially provided [duplicate]

I'm confused about using phrases like "can be easily accessed". When I'm deciding which of the following I should use: it can be potentially provided it can potentially be provided by searching ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

Adverb placement, before or after the verb [duplicate]

first time on this side of the StackExchange. Quick question: My dream is to code a chess game, and then have the AI I developed checkmate me legitimately. vs. My dream is to code a chess ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

"can be clearly seen" OR "can clearly be seen" [duplicate]

In my essay the sentence The results can be clearly seen. was corrected to: The results can clearly be seen. What is the rule behind this correction? Most of the time I use "can be" ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

Where do I place the frequency adverb "often"? [duplicate]

Imagine the following situation: Person A says to person B, that B will be the target of taunt/sneers/ridicule etc. Is it possible to formulate the following sentence (regarding the word order)? "...
2
votes
1answer
765 views

Position of adverbial phrase [duplicate]

Is there a difference in these two sentences, and if so, what is the difference? Immediately afterwards I remembered having met her. I remembered having met her immediately afterwards. I think there ...
1
vote
2answers
783 views

Positioning of adverb phrases [duplicate]

Here are three ways to say the same thing. I wonder if there are particular rules regarding to the position of adverb phrases: Then play those passages over and over again in your memory Or, ...
0
votes
1answer
348 views

Splitting the components of a compound verb [duplicate]

I've always understood that splitting infinitives should be avoided; e.g., instead of To boldly go where no man has gone before. use To go boldly where no man has gone before. With that in ...
0
votes
1answer
429 views

Position of "ultimately" in a sentence [duplicate]

I have an american friend who tells me that this sentence: [...] Since their absence results in a relevant market which is defined too broad, the two-sided critical loss analysis cannot be ...
0
votes
1answer
321 views

difference in meaning depending on placement of "already" [duplicate]

Maybe the bus already left. Maybe the bus has already left. Maybe the bus has left already. I am not a native speaker so don't know if there is any difference among those three sentences, not ...
0
votes
1answer
222 views

Where to put an adverb? [duplicate]

Can somebody say where I should put the adverb in this phrase: "I’m going to thoroughly teach you a lesson." or "I’m going to teach you a lesson thoroughly." And which ...
0
votes
1answer
90 views

"I found that, on average, there are...." or "I found, on average, that there are..."? [duplicate]

So if you couldn't figure out the question from the title, does the subordinating conjunction (the word "that") precede or succeed the extra information between the commas?

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