Linked Questions

0
votes
2answers
17k views

British and other English variants of 'write to me' - 'write me'' [duplicate]

In British English, the standard is 'write to me'. In American English the standard is 'write me'. Similar variants exist with 'out of the window' and 'out the window'. When did the dropping of ...
3
votes
3answers
1k views

Give it me! Write me! [duplicate]

Our young grandson, who is a Mancunian, says 'give it me', and 'give it me back', which is a northern British standard. It made me think that it is not only northerners who omit the indirect object ...
0
votes
0answers
44 views

Why not “I opened him the door”? [duplicate]

In actions that involve another person, we can structure sentences like the following examples: I drove him home. I cooked him a meal. I gave him a spoon. I threw him the ball. I'm not sure of the ...
15
votes
5answers
342k views

Which one is more appropriate to use: “send you” or “send to you”?

Are both of the following sentences correct? Let me know if there is still something I need to send to you. Let me know if there is still something I need to send you. Which one is more appropriate ...
11
votes
5answers
15k views

Is “Whom did you give the book?” ungrammatical?

You gave him the book.                       (1) Based on the sentence (1), it seems to me that the following form of question is possible: ...
12
votes
3answers
14k views

Reflexive love: where does “love me some …” come from?

It seems trendy to use a reflexive-like construction with love or hate plus some, like this: You know I love me some cheese! I hate me some cold and the temperature is dropping. Where did this come ...
4
votes
5answers
100k views

“Share me” or “Share with me”?

I heard people saying: Can you please share me the slides? or Can you share me the note, etc.? I think it should be: Can you please share the slides with me? or Can you share the ...
4
votes
4answers
17k views

“to throw someone something” vs “to throw something at someone”

In the following sentence, the need for the at preposition is clear: "He threw something at him" However, if I started the sentence the other way round, it would feel (at least to me) as if the ...
9
votes
3answers
8k views

Why “answer me” but not “answer me the question”?

Why are "answer me" and "answer the question" acceptable but not "answer me the question"? Is it similar to "explain me (something)"?
4
votes
3answers
9k views

Is saying “Let me show you it” totally wrong?

My kids (8-10yrs) love to say things like this. It just rolls naturally out and I correct them often. Is there is a specific reason the grammar is wrong? Maybe for the brain it is more direct than ...
3
votes
2answers
21k views

Order of phrases after verb: Prefer “share with you X” or “share X with you”?

Which of these sentences is grammatically correct? I wanted to share with you the outcomes of today's board meeting I wanted to share the outcomes of today's board meeting with you
5
votes
2answers
4k views

“had me a blast” - what use of “have” is it?

Reading the Summer love lyrics, the lyrics go as follows: "summer love, had me a blast". I know that "have a blast" means to enjoy etc. But I do not think I could say "it has me a blast".
1
vote
3answers
8k views

“I gave him + INDIRECT OBJECT” vs. “I gave + INDIRECT OBJECT+ to him”

Consider these two sentences: "I gave him a pencil," and, "I gave a pencil to him." Is it correct that the important part of the sentence is placed at the end? When we want to emphasize the pencil ...
1
vote
1answer
16k views

Use of verb to give is used alone or with preposition “to”? [duplicate]

Why is it that when I say "I will give this book to my daughter", I am using the verb "give" and the preposition "to", but "to" is not used in the following: "What kind of names do people in your ...
2
votes
2answers
6k views

Is “offer something someone” without “to” in between correct?

I interpret the latter part of the following sentence to mean "and are quite unprepared to offer the priority seats to those whom the seats are meant for." If this is correct, "to" seems to be missing ...
0
votes
3answers
5k views

Is “cry” an intransitive verb, or can it be transitive? - as in “Cry me a river”

When I look up the word, it should be an intransitive verb (no object). However, I'm still curious about the title "Cry me a river". Can I say that "I cried a bucket"?
5
votes
1answer
4k views

Can a prepositional phrase act as an indirect object?

For example, in the sentence: I baked a cake for my mom. Direct object (DO): cake Indirect object (IO): for my mom Some webpages say IO can only come before DO While others explain that a ...
2
votes
4answers
2k views

What is the direct object in the sentence “He causes you difficulty”?

I'm confused because if I said "he cause you to go home", the "you" would be the direct object, correct? But if I said "cause you difficulty", I would think that the direct object would be 'difficulty"...
8
votes
1answer
798 views

How did the prepositions up and down both come to be associated with writing?

Per this question "Writing things down" vs. "writing things up", it is clear that things can be written "up" (typically in respect to longer entries that are being thoroughly ...
1
vote
1answer
6k views

“make me a cup of coffee” vs “make a cup of coffee for me”

Actually, it's all in the title. Would you make me a cup of coffee, please? Would you make a cup of coffee for me, please? Is there any difference either in the meaning or traditional ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

Direct and indirect object with the verb “kick” [closed]

Are both theses sentences correct and commonly used: "Kick the ball to me." "Kick me the ball."?
1
vote
1answer
659 views

TOEFL gerund vs infinitive question [closed]

While doing my TOEFL prep I encountered the following statement where I am asked to find which of the bold words is being used wrongly in the sentence: If one has a special medical condition such ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

verbs with two direct objects

In German the verb fragen takes 2 direct objects. Is it the same in English? I ask you something. Or is the person being asked considered an indirect object? If so, can I reformulate it using ...
3
votes
1answer
528 views

What are some give-type verbs that cannot undergo straight dative alternation?

The following dative alternations sound off to me: I want to donate my clothes to charity. --> I want to donate charity my clothes. He has to submit his paper to his teacher. --> He has to ...
1
vote
2answers
481 views

'Ask' and its objects

I'd like to know if the objects of the verb 'ask' must follow an order. If so what is that order? Should the first object be the person (someone) or the thing (something)? For example: Will you ask ...
0
votes
2answers
509 views

Usage of “to” in the statement

Is there any difference between the two statements below? If yes, please let us know the difference. I sent him a note yesterday I sent a note to him yesterday If both the statements are ...
1
vote
1answer
392 views

Is it a prepositional or a ditransitive phrase? [closed]

Prepositional phrase? I resolved not to allow frivolous preoccupations to deflect me. (I cause, not to receive frivolous preoccupations to deflect me) It had, after all, brought home to me (the ...
1
vote
3answers
223 views

Can the verb “gain” take two complements?

Is it correct to say: The prudent guidance and innovation gained Jane and John much fame. I think that this sentence is grammatically incorrect because the verb gain cannot take two complements ...
2
votes
1answer
184 views

Can you use a ditransitive construction with the verb 'to attribute'?

Examples: John attributed his cold to his wife. Jane attributed wisdom to her father that he didn't really possess. The above are standard transitive constructions. Can I then properly say the ...
-1
votes
1answer
237 views

“Bring down X” vs. “bring X down” [duplicate]

I am unable to understand the difference between these two sentences: I want him to bring down the opponents. I want him to bring the opponents down. Which is right and when should each be ...
1
vote
0answers
80 views

Is “she was peeled an orange (by me)” unacceptable in English?

Is "she was peeled an orange (by me)" unacceptable in English when 'she' is interpreted as an intended recipient? I found Kay (1996: 11-12) claims that "I'll peel you an orange" has two possible ...
0
votes
0answers
50 views

Why don't we have a preposition after “buy” in this sentence

Why don't we have a preposition after buy in this sentence? Each dollar in my asset column was a great employee, working hard to make more employees and buy the boss a new Porsche.
1
vote
2answers
32 views

Question re: proper usage of to + infinitive construction

I have recently been asked about the grammatical accuracy of the sentence "My mother bought the book for me to study English." This sentence is meant to convey that the writer's mother ...