Linked Questions

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0answers
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Possessive form [duplicate]

![The picture says "To form the possessive of any singular proper noun, add an apostrophe and an S. For example, Venus's beauty Dickens's reputation But I saw somewhere, Aeschylus' Sophocles' There ...
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0answers
18 views

Félix's or Félix'? [duplicate]

Very important question! My friend Félix and I have a group called "Asteflix Novices". We have no idea if the correct way of spelling it would be "Asteflix' Novices" or "Asteflix's Novices". I heard ...
59
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7answers
28k views

When did it become correct to add an “s” to a singular possessive already ending in “‑s”?

According to my grammar book, but at variance to the answer to this question, the correct singular possessive if a word ends in ‑s is: James’s car The grammar book allows exceptions for historical ...
86
votes
2answers
136k views

What is the correct possessive for nouns ending in “‑s”?

What is the possessive of a noun ending in ‑s? Are these both right, or is the second one wrong? the boys' books the boss' car
17
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4answers
55k views

What is the pronunciation of the possessive words that already end in s? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When did it become correct to add an ‘s’ to a singular possessive already ending in ‘s’? Which singular names ending in “s” form possessives with only a bare apostrophe? My ...
7
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2answers
21k views

Why is it “Paris’s cafés” but “Massachusetts’ capital”?

I’ve been studying the apostrophe and found this in Merriam-Webster’s Guide to Punctuation and Style: The possessives of proper names are generally formed in the same way as those of common nouns. ...
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1answer
21k views

What does 's mean at the end of someone's name? [closed]

I understand 's means is and has, if 's is used at the end of a name, Does it mean is or has?Let's suppose Ex is a someone's name. Ex is object -it can mean Ex is an object, totally incorrect ...
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2answers
3k views

How do you decline nouns borrowed from languages with several categories for declining nouns (or none at all)?

English has two grammatical categories of number. One is the singular, and the other is the plural. Many nouns in English have different singular and plural forms. When nouns are borrowed from ...
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1answer
5k views

Possessive and plural suffixes for proper nouns ending in -s [closed]

With a name that ends in -s, such as Travis or Lewis, where and when should you use -es, -'s, -s or just leave it alone to both pluralise, and to infer belonging to? E.g., if the ball belongs to ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

Which (if any) pedantically, grammatically, correct uses of the apostrophe will lead to a valid “NOUNs’s” construction?

The “<NOUN>s’s” construction comes up quite often in signs, at least in my neighbourhood. I haven’t seen a legal use of the arrangement, though — and I wonder, is it at all possible? If it ...
2
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1answer
5k views

What is the possessive form of a singular noun ending with a plural s?

I would tend to treat a company name as singular and would therefore write the possessive form with 's. Now, my company refers to its international operations by placing the country name behind the ...
1
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1answer
5k views

Should an apostrophe be used with a z at the end of a word? [duplicate]

I know that if a word ends with an s then it should be made plural or possessive by use of an apostrophe with no extra s (e.g. "Thomas Harris' book was a riveting read." as opposed to "Gary Barlow's ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

Pronunciation of the apostrophe

Is there a rule regarding the pronunciation (or lack of) of the apostrophe? I have seen this on tv: "Enchantress' wrath" pronounced as "Echantresses wrath" "Gus' schedule" pronounced as "Guses ...
0
votes
1answer
3k views

What to use after a word which ends with “se” to indicate possession? [duplicate]

I apologize for the seemingly simple question. I've searched on Google for this, but could not find anything. The word "Recluse", meaning (noun) "a person who lives a solitary life and tends to avoid ...
4
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1answer
2k views

Name, Conditions, and Pluralization of “Conscience' sake”

In some versions of the Bible, 1 Cor. 10:25 contains the phrase conscience' sake with no s following the possessive apostrophe of conscience, which does not end with s, as in: New American Standard ...

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