Linked Questions

6
votes
2answers
35k views

“Goose”–“geese” vs. “moose”–“moose” [duplicate]

Why is it that the plural of goose is geese but the plural of moose is moose? The same goes for mouse and house. Mouse becomes mice, yet house becomes houses.
1
vote
0answers
7k views

oo-ee change for plurals [duplicate]

The plural of tooth is teeth but the plural of booth is booths. The plural of goose is geese but the plural of moose is moose. The plural of foot is feet but the plurals of root, boot, and toot are ...
0
votes
0answers
70 views

What’s going on with "hot -> heat”? [duplicate]

I am looking for a particular linguistic term for this process of turning words like hot into words like heat. English has a bunch of pairs like these: Hot -> heat Whole -> heal (Folk)lore ->...
1
vote
0answers
50 views

What’s going on with “food > feed”? Is it like “foot > feet”? [duplicate]

I am looking for a particular linguistic term for this process of turning nouns like food into verbs like feed. For all I know, it may be older than English, perhaps even going back all the way to OE. ...
41
votes
15answers
12k views

Backstabs you constantly in a subtle way

What do call call when someone Backstabs you constantly subtlely with you only realizing it after a fixed time because of the subtle nature and you always giving them the benefit of the doubt. The ...
69
votes
3answers
112k views

What’s the rule for adding “-er” vs. “-or” when forming an agent noun from a verb?

What’s the rule to decide whether you add -er or whether you add -or when creating an agent noun from a verb? Sometimes it’s -er: read > reader hate > hater hit > hitter But other times it’s -...
29
votes
5answers
71k views

Why is the 'w' silent in “sword”?

In RP English, the 'w' in "sword" is silent. Wiktionary suggests /sɔːd/ and /soʊrd/. Why? Are there other words like this? The 'w' is pronounced in words like "swollen", "swoop", "sworn" and "swore".
26
votes
5answers
7k views

Silent “w” in words starting with “wr-”

My eldest is a beginning reader. Yesterday we read one of my favorite books, The Wreck of the Zephyr. He pointed at wreck and asked me why that one looked like it said "wuh-reck." I explained that ...
13
votes
1answer
5k views

Why is the plural form of Moose not Meese? [duplicate]

Is there a reason that Moose becomes Mooses instead of Meese (as in tooth/teeth and foot/feet)
21
votes
2answers
3k views

What’s going on with “drink > drench”? Is it like “passage > passenger”?

Edit: I am looking for a particular linguistic term for this process (which here uses terminal palatalization to indicate such) of turning passive verbs like drink into active verbs like drench. I ...
3
votes
4answers
16k views

Pronunciation of “Einstein”

Why is Einstein pronounced with a s instead of sh, while the ei is pronounced ine? This looks inconsistent.
16
votes
4answers
26k views

What is the best way to mention a word: italics, quotes, or single-quotes (apostrophes)?

If I want to mention the word "furlong", for example, should I use furlong, "furlong", or 'furlong'? Also, am I correct in putting the punctuation outside the quotes?
17
votes
4answers
4k views

Why “English” but not “Anglish”?

Etymology of English from Etymonline: Old English Englisc (contrasted to Denisc, Frencisce, etc.), from Engle (plural) "the Angles," the name of one of the Germanic groups that overran the island ...
9
votes
5answers
8k views

Etymology of “hell.” Possible link to Norse mythology?

The following etymological question has been slumbering in my head for a while, and was woken up by the post on the word "hella." My Concise Oxford English Dictionary, my faithful vade mecum, tells ...
2
votes
1answer
3k views

Origin of the word “elder” [closed]

I was wondering if this word is in anyway related to some ancient diety or religion, if so which ?

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