Linked Questions

18
votes
3answers
466k views

“Good to hear” vs “Glad to hear”

Which one is correct: Good to hear you enjoyed the radio show. or: Glad to hear you enjoyed the radio show.
8
votes
2answers
91k views

When is (it) a good time to call you?

When is it a good time to call you? When is a good time to call you? Everybody tells me that both are correct. What is the exact grammatical difference?
2
votes
3answers
6k views

Does the verb 'rain' belong to some special class of verbs since its subject is always 'it'?

The subject of the verb 'rain' is always 'it' when the referred sense of the verb is 'rain fall' It rained heavily last night. Do you think it will rain again this evening? It looks as though the ...
2
votes
2answers
23k views

Does “help” take the preposition “to”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the correct way to use infinitive after the verb “help”: with or without “to”? “Help rule out” vs. “help to rule out” ...
2
votes
2answers
13k views

will be possible to be used

Is it (1) correct, (2) natural/wise to say the following in english: "[X] will be possible to be used here as [Y, ie. some function/role]"? Are there any alternatives, and if there are, are they a ...
4
votes
4answers
4k views

“Despite the fact” implies knowledge of said facts

I had an argument about the phrase "despite the fact". The argument was around the headline: US Immigration officials deport 14 year old runaway to Colombia, despite the fact that she's American ...
2
votes
3answers
6k views

It's all I can do

It's all I can do to stop myself from checking the website every 5 seconds! I know what this phrase means, but does anybody know where it came from? On the face of it, it doesn't make any sense. ...
7
votes
2answers
2k views

“It would be a better idea to” VS “A better idea would be to”

I'm contemplating these two sentences: I think it would be a better idea to show you my works. I think a better idea would be to show you my works. as answers to a question "Can you tell me ...
2
votes
1answer
4k views

“It's cold outside” vs. “There is cold outside”

Why don't we use "there is" when we're talking about cold outside? What is the difference in meaning between "it's cold outside" and "there is cold outside"? Update. Let me explain my question a bit....
0
votes
2answers
3k views

It is possible + infinitive

It is not possible to keep abreast of the normal tides of acquisition. (Source) Can someone analyze this sentence? My first thought was that the infinitive 'to keep' modifies possible, but then I ...
0
votes
2answers
2k views

It takes/requires/needs for someone to do something [closed]

Practically all books on English grammar teach the construction "It takes [an amount of time, effort, etc] for somebody to do something" as in: It took three months to finish the paper. Now I ...
0
votes
2answers
2k views

In the sentence 'She seems nice', is 'nice' a subject complement, verb complement, or both?

In the sentence below, is nice a subject complement, verb complement, or both? She seems nice. According to this page, it’s a type of verb complement; but it also seems to me to fit with the ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

Do they call this *it* expletive?

Given the example: Was it then that I thought of Alan? No, earlier. From the very first wave of panic my mind reached out to him. Yes, even then, in the heart of the fear, there was a still small ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

Is “To say which method is better, it's a relative thing” correct?

Is "To say which method is better, it's a relative thing" correct to express that a method is better depending on the circumstances? Or is there a better way to express that? The context is: ...
1
vote
2answers
975 views

How difficult was that decision to make vs How difficult was it to make that decision? [closed]

How difficult was that decision to make? How difficult was it to make that decision? How difficult was that decision to be made? Are there any differences among the above-mentioned sentences?

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