Linked Questions

4
votes
3answers
5k views

Is it okay to say “Yes you're.” instead of “Yes you are.”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is there some rule against ending a sentence with the contraction “it's”? I was having an SMS conversation with a friend and somehow "Yes you're" came into ...
5
votes
3answers
3k views

Shortest correct sentence in English- use of contractions [duplicate]

I often hear people saying that "I am" is the shortest sentence in the English language. I know that there are also discussions about sentences using the imperative mood such as "Go." that would be ...
3
votes
1answer
3k views

“If you don't do it, I'll”. Why does that sentence feel so awkward? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is there some rule against ending a sentence with the contraction “it’s”? Earlier today while writing a very informal email, I expressed: If you don't do it, I will. Upon ...
0
votes
1answer
7k views

Is it ever grammatically correct to say “I'm sure they're.” [duplicate]

I currently can't think of a good reason grammatically; but there are plenty in terms of clear communication.
0
votes
2answers
668 views

Why does the contraction of “I will” sound strange in certain sentence constructions? [duplicate]

Recently, while chatting with a friend via text, my friend asked me, "Can you ask them tomorrow?" I responded with: I will when I go. It occurred to me when writing this response that it would be ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

Can “it's” be used as a question? [duplicate]

In my experience, people say "it's" in place of "it is," but never in the form of a question. I think the question "It's?" sounds awkward, but I'd like to know if it's grammatically correct. Is it? ...
9
votes
2answers
1k views

Is there a rule for when contractions are not possible? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is there some rule against ending a sentence with the contraction “it's”? In conversing with non-native English speakers online, I saw someone type: Do you ...
0
votes
1answer
3k views

Does I'll replace I will? [duplicate]

I can say "I will go", or "I'll go", and the both mean the same thing. However, if you ask me "Can you go?", can I respond with "I'll" instead of "I will"?
2
votes
1answer
1k views

Using “it's” vs. using “it is” at the end of a sentence [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is there some rule against ending a sentence with the contraction “it's”? Why is it that the following sounds incorrect: "Would she know where it's?" But ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

appropriate usage of I am / I'm [duplicate]

I am trying to explain to someone why the following quote should use "I am" rather than "I'm": I don't care how old I'm, I still like [media] I feel that I am correct, but cannot recall the rule.
3
votes
1answer
160 views

Why isn’t “It’s” a complete sentence, but “It is” is? [duplicate]

I’m a native English speaker, so I understand that It’s. is not a complete sentence, whereas the sentence It is. is a complete sentence. What linguistic mechanism prevents “It’s.” from being ...
3
votes
0answers
77 views

Using “it's” instead of “it is” [duplicate]

I like the way contractions operate and I know the difference between "it's" and "its" based on contraction and possession. That is, "it's = it is" and "its" is possessive. However, there are some ...
5
votes
0answers
56 views

Can you end a sentence with a clitic like “they're”? [duplicate]

I saw someone write the sentence "Of course they're". As a native English speaker, this instantly seemed wrong but I couldn't come up with a good reason as to why. I did a bit of research and there ...
0
votes
0answers
70 views

When can one use a contraction at the end of a sentence? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is there some rule against ending a sentence with the contraction “it's”? Sometimes it's fine to use a contraction at the end of a sentence: "If you're ...
1
vote
0answers
39 views

“Ready when you're.” or “Ready when you are.” [duplicate]

Should I follow up the first sentence with the word ready? And if so, why is this so?

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