Linked Questions

2
votes
1answer
472 views

The difference between a sentence starting with 'to' + verb and starting with a gerund [duplicate]

What is the difference between the following two sentences? To study English is hard. Studying English is hard.
2
votes
1answer
17k views

"To see" vs "seeing" [duplicate]

Which of the following is grammatical? To see my stuff at your grocery is a great source of pride! Seeing my stuff at your grocery is a great source of pride! The verb "to see" is the ...
1
vote
1answer
6k views

When to use a gerund or an infinitive after "is"?

How does one know when to use a gerund or an infinitive? states a 90% rule, but I'm more interested in the remaining 10%. This British Council page states Sorry, there isn’t a rule. You have to learn ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

"-ing" verb + gerund

I am aware that some verbs require the use of a gerund in certain constructions like "to avoid doing something". However, does this rule extend to the case that avoid is also used in an -ing form? ...
0
votes
1answer
517 views

Choice of Gerund or infinitive as subject of a sentence [duplicate]

In a multiple choice exercise I had to choose between: .................... is banned in all pubs in Ireland. A/ To smoke B/ Smoking I'm pretty sure the solution is B (Smoking) but I don't really ...
0
votes
1answer
675 views

To + verb, bare verb or verb + ing in noun phrases [duplicate]

I've asked this around and I'm RACKING MY BRAIN trying to figure it out. Which one is the correct verb form in the following sentence? The craziest thing I've ever done is go / to go / going ...
0
votes
1answer
4k views

Clauses of purpose: "for + -ing" or "to-infinitive [duplicate]

In the following sentence, how should the clause of purpose be introduced? In addition to normal maintenance, there are additional costs associated with interventions that may be required to ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

"These findings are critical [to inform/for informing] future research" [duplicate]

In this sentence, would you use "to inform" or "for informing"? These findings are critical ______ future research Likewise, would you use "to understand" or "for understanding" in the following? ...
0
votes
1answer
418 views

“To hear” or “hearing” [duplicate]

Nothing is so happy as to hear from your family. Nothing is so happy as hearing from your family. Which is more natural for native speakers?
0
votes
1answer
3k views

Difference between “is to do” and “is doing” [duplicate]

I saw below sentence: Her job is to clean the hall. So can I also say like: Her job is cleaning the hall. It's present participle or gerund? What's the different meaning between these two ...
0
votes
1answer
5k views

"Developed to [infinitive]" vs. "developed for [gerund]" [duplicate]

I am confused about when to use "to verb" and when to use "for verb+ing" constructs. For example what would be the proper construct for the following sentences extracted from scientific journals: A ...
-1
votes
1answer
5k views

"To ask" or "for asking" [duplicate]

It is a great place for asking questions. OR It is a great place to ask questions.
-2
votes
1answer
54 views

Problem with gerund and infinitive [closed]

I'm confusing with use of gerund or infinitive, I don't know which one of them I should use, for example ; I'm looking for a function to reverse a string I'm looking for a function for reversing a ...
0
votes
0answers
15 views

"to think about" in the beginning of a sentence [duplicate]

Can someone explain to me what this sentence means? I got confused about why it had "to think about" at the beginning of a sentence. "To think about income elasticity analogous to a ...
0
votes
0answers
24 views

To smoke vs Smoking at the beginning of the sentence [duplicate]

I have been taught that we can use either of "to INF" or "Verb-ing" at the beginning of the sentence as a subject, which leads me to a point of confusion. Here is my confusion: A: To smoke is ...

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