Linked Questions

2
votes
2answers
20k views

Does “help” take the preposition “to”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the correct way to use infinitive after the verb “help”: with or without “to”? “Help rule out” vs. “help to rule out” ...
2
votes
4answers
2k views

Why is the verb used without “-s” in this sentence? [duplicate]

In order to help the system make a better guess of the corner locations,... In this sentence, why is "make" not succeeded by "s"? It seems it is needed!
6
votes
1answer
2k views

“Help rule out” vs. “help to rule out” [duplicate]

Duplicate of: What is the correct way to use infinitive after the verb “help”: with or without “to”? “Could help avoid” vs. “could help to avoid” “Helping you do ...
1
vote
1answer
12k views

Help me cook vs help me to cook? [duplicate]

This question has been rounding my head for a while, id say help me cook but then i think about omitting "to" which i think isn't correct. Can you give me more examples about this situation. Thanks ...
2
votes
0answers
2k views

“Could help avoid” vs. “could help to avoid” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Help to do” or “help do”? Is it correct to say: The right sitting posture could help you avoid back problems. OR The right sitting posture ...
1
vote
0answers
2k views

Help us decide vs. help us to decide [duplicate]

I'm having a hard time to decide between the correct form. Is it "help us decide" or "help us to decide"? Please also state the reason for your answer. Thank you very much!
0
votes
2answers
1k views

use of “to” after “helping one” [duplicate]

What is correct: helping one to accomplish the dreams? OR helping one accomplish the dreams? The question I have is about the use of to in the first sentence?
0
votes
1answer
711 views

To “to” or Not To “to” [duplicate]

I often come across sentences such as, "Our program assists, at no cost, students maintain independent living..." I believe it should be written as, "Our program assists, at no cost, students to ...
-2
votes
2answers
810 views

Is a bare infinitive acceptable as the object of a verb? [duplicate]

I came upon the phrase, "writing helps develop a child analytically thinking." Is this grammatically correct? Is it OK to use just develop instead of to develop?
-1
votes
1answer
436 views

Two verbs used consecutively [duplicate]

Is it correct to say Tsunami coupling in the code 'helps determine' human casualty i.e., is use of multiple verbs consecutively correct? Also, is it 'help determine' or 'helps determine'?
0
votes
1answer
420 views

infinitive usage in complex sentence [duplicate]

which one is correct? An evaluation of the Cronicle interface suggests that Cronicle helped the participants to find data accurately. or An evaluation of the Cronicle interface suggests that ...
8
votes
0answers
452 views

Infinitive without “to”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the correct way to use infinitive after the verb “help”: with or without “to”? Today I found this headline on bbc.co.uk How one family is ...
0
votes
2answers
377 views

How to help them succeed [duplicate]

why the following question is-> How to help them succeed? instead of How to help them TO succeed?
0
votes
1answer
321 views

Use of verb 'help' [duplicate]

Which of the following sentences are correct and why? Could you please help my son get the job? Could you please help my son in getting the job?
2
votes
0answers
210 views

“Helping you do something” or “Helping you to do something”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the correct way to use infinitive after the verb “help”: with or without “to”? In the phrase "Helping you to master Russian", is it correct to ...
1
vote
0answers
114 views

Is it correct to say “John helps you talk with people”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the correct way to use infinitive after the verb "help": with or without "to"? Sorry if this is a stupid question, but English is not my first language. For me it ...
0
votes
1answer
56 views

Do we add “to” the second verb (paint) because it's in the infinitive? [duplicate]

Can you help me paint the hall this weekend? Can you help me to paint the hall this weekend? Do we add "to" the second verb (paint) because it's in the infinitive?
1
vote
1answer
28 views

“A manual written to help students to understand the module” [duplicate]

Or should it be without the second "to" like this: "A manual written to help students understand the module"? I'm guessing that either is generally acceptable but is there a traditional grammar rule ...
0
votes
0answers
22 views

To drop the preposition to or not? [duplicate]

Which one of these is correct and why? Is there a difference between American English and British English? Or spoken vs written English? To drop the "to" or not? 24-hour access to your Personal ...
0
votes
0answers
22 views

Help me get vs help me to get [duplicate]

Example sentences: I think that studying another day will help me to get a higher mark in the test I think that studying another week will help me to improve my qualities This is how I would say ...
1
vote
3answers
63k views

You're welcome, it's been my pleasure helping you out?

Is it correct to say: You're welcome, it has been my pleasure helping you out! Or is this more correct: You're welcome, it has been my pleasure to help you out! Or are both fine?
6
votes
2answers
6k views

Omitting the last “to” in “All {I need to / have to / must} do is (to?) do something” [duplicate]

I remember I learned a structure like the one that this post’s title mentions: All I {need to do | have to do | must do} is do something. But is it correct to use "to do something" after the "is" ...
4
votes
1answer
33k views

“Help in doing something” or “Help doing something”

Is the preposition in necessary or abundant? To be specific, which of these two sentences sounds better/is correct? This helps in achieving better fuel economy. or This helps achieving better ...
1
vote
2answers
9k views

“help achieve” usage (verb licensing) [duplicate]

When I was taught English (as a foreign language) I was told that there are two ways of putting verbs together: learn to play (to + infinitive) quit smoking (gerund) Some verbs require one way and ...
4
votes
3answers
2k views

Difference between “help + [infinitive]” with and without “to”

Englishgrammar.org has an article discussing cases where an infinitive does not use the word "to." One case is with many causative verbs like "make" and "let." I want the water to run *I want ...
3
votes
3answers
204 views

Using an unrelated “too” before an infinitive

I came across the following in a children's textbook about Japanese: [Ninja] did not have magic powers but they did have [discipline, determination and daring] ... These attributes will help you ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

“Help” as a Non-Modal verb

Please read the following sentence: Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer is planning his retirement in the next nine months from the software giant he helped build. Would you consider "helped" a Non-Modal ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

Why can't I use the word 'to' after the verb 'helped'?

I know it is incorrect to say, "They helped to her" and that it should be, "They helped her", but why is the word "to" not needed? And yet the word to is in this sentence: "They helped to get her free....
-1
votes
1answer
218 views

Smb helped smb reached smth [closed]

In the following phrase, is it a correct usage of the word "reached"? "People just like you helped Companyname reached countries around the world". I would use the verb "to reach" in the infinitive ...
2
votes
2answers
172 views

“Get help with [deciding]” or just “get help [deciding]”

I've looked at similar questions but couldn't find any describing whether "with" should be used in this situation. This question seems the most similar, the result being that it is okay to use "to" ...

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