Linked Questions

15
votes
3answers
41k views

Pronunciation of "Blessed"

Is there any difference in meaning or usage when pronouncing "blessed" with two syllables rather than one syllable? Two: bles-id [blɛsəd] One: blest [blɛst]
9
votes
3answers
11k views

Why pronunciation of "Crooked" is "Crook-ked"? [duplicate]

I've noticed that the pronunciations of "picked" gives its sound like "pick" with final sound "d" but for "Crooked" and "Naked" Why do they pronounce them like "Crook-ked" and "Nake-ked"? How can I ...
8
votes
6answers
12k views

Are there any pairs of words like "beloved"/"belovèd", "learned"/"learnèd" that maintain a semantic difference to the present day?

When I first read Romeo and Juliet in high school, I remember being intrigued by pairs of words such as, beloved/belovèd and learned/learnèd where there's an accent grave on the 'e' of the ...
14
votes
2answers
5k views

Where does "wicked" get its /ɪd/ from?

There are three ways I know to pronounce the -ed at the end of an adjective: /t/ as in cracked. /d/ as in lined. /ɪd/ as in naked I realise naked is a special case because, as etymonline states, it ...
7
votes
1answer
1k views

Odd pronunciation of adjectives ending in -ed

I am currently listening to an audiobook reading of Keats poetry by Sir Ralph Richardson, and I have noticed a peculiar pronunciation of adjectives ending in -ed. While I have heard in the past ...
1
vote
2answers
3k views

Is it possible for a word to have multiple different syllable counts? If so what is an example?

to further clarify, for example is it possible to have one word that has one pronunciation that is 2 syllables and at the same time the exact same word has another pronunciation that is 3 syllables
5
votes
2answers
333 views

Was the use of accents in -ed adjectives ever common-place? When were they first used in modern books?

The distinction between the words blessèd (/ˈblɛsəd/) and blessed (/blɛst/) (see Grammarbook) appears to be wearing thin in modern language, possibly due to reduced accent usage and its resultant lack ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

Pronunciation of 'deserved' in different contexts? [duplicate]

First, may I begin by saying that I love the English language! After so many years, I still find myself learning something new each day. The question Are there any pairs of words like "beloved&...
0
votes
0answers
766 views

"Cursed" as two syllables in poetry [duplicate]

While the normal pronunciation of "cursed" is in one syllable, I have seen it used as a two-syllable word, "curs-ed". The Cambridge dictionary lists this pronunciation as an alternative in UK only: ...
0
votes
0answers
64 views

When to pronounce 'beloved' in 2 syllables vs 3 syllables [duplicate]

I've heard this pronounced as two syllables: be-loved. And as three syllables: be-lov-ed. Is only one correct? If not, what cases require each use?