Linked Questions

33
votes
3answers
348k views

Simple Past vs. Present Perfect: “was” vs. “has been” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Did it close” vs “Has it closed”? As a English non-native speaker it is difficult for me to understand when I must use present perfect or past simple ...
33
votes
2answers
423k views

“Have you got a chance to” vs “Did you get a chance to”

What is the difference between following two statements? Have you got a chance to look into this? Did you get a chance to look into this?
18
votes
1answer
96k views

Which is correct: “has died” or “died”?

To me, using Present Perfect form means the event can occur again. So, saying someone has died may not be grammatically correct. Also, I noticed (it might be just coincidence): passed away ...
13
votes
6answers
42k views

“I have never said” versus “I never said”

I have never said this. I never said this. Is the usage of have in the first sentence justified or grammatically correct? What is the difference in meaning? When should I use one form over the ...
7
votes
2answers
17k views

Present perfect for past action with present effect

If I seem tired, can I say: "I haven't slept last night"? If not, why have I been told that we use present perfect for actions that have present effects?
7
votes
3answers
45k views

“I just ate them” and “I've just eaten them” — What's the difference in American and in British?

I know there are differences between American and British English in this area. So when answering, please specify whether you speak American or British English.
4
votes
1answer
62k views

“Have you seen…” or “Did you see…?”

In the US, when people work together, they may look for a colleague or any person to say something or for any other reason, asking colleagues or other people this type of question: Have you ...
3
votes
3answers
1k views

“I burned the toast” vs. “I've burned the toast”

I have a question about a sentence I read in the comic strip Garfield. Garfield's owner, Jon, brings him a burnt piece of toast saying, I burned the toast. Well, once there's no time specified ...
1
vote
4answers
2k views

Does the present perfect imply an action finished in the past? [duplicate]

reading passage: Ten Taiwanese film directors, producers and screenwriters have been invited to participate in a two-day workshop in Paris next week, to seek co-production opportunities with their ...
1
vote
1answer
178 views

Simple Past vs. Present Perfect for recently completed actions [duplicate]

In the following dialogue: A: Look! I have bought a new hat. B: Nice! Where did you buy it? or C. Nice! Where have you bought it? Which is correct, b or c? Or both?