Linked Questions

1
vote
1answer
178 views

Simple Past vs. Present Perfect for recently completed actions [duplicate]

In the following dialogue: A: Look! I have bought a new hat. B: Nice! Where did you buy it? or C. Nice! Where have you bought it? Which is correct, b or c? Or both?
3
votes
3answers
1k views

“I burned the toast” vs. “I've burned the toast”

I have a question about a sentence I read in the comic strip Garfield. Garfield's owner, Jon, brings him a burnt piece of toast saying, I burned the toast. Well, once there's no time specified ...
4
votes
1answer
61k views

“Have you seen…” or “Did you see…?”

In the US, when people work together, they may look for a colleague or any person to say something or for any other reason, asking colleagues or other people this type of question: Have you ...
1
vote
4answers
2k views

Does the present perfect imply an action finished in the past? [duplicate]

reading passage: Ten Taiwanese film directors, producers and screenwriters have been invited to participate in a two-day workshop in Paris next week, to seek co-production opportunities with their ...
33
votes
2answers
422k views

“Have you got a chance to” vs “Did you get a chance to”

What is the difference between following two statements? Have you got a chance to look into this? Did you get a chance to look into this?
33
votes
3answers
347k views

Simple Past vs. Present Perfect: “was” vs. “has been” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Did it close” vs “Has it closed”? As a English non-native speaker it is difficult for me to understand when I must use present perfect or past simple ...
18
votes
1answer
96k views

Which is correct: “has died” or “died”?

To me, using Present Perfect form means the event can occur again. So, saying someone has died may not be grammatically correct. Also, I noticed (it might be just coincidence): passed away ...
7
votes
2answers
17k views

Present perfect for past action with present effect

If I seem tired, can I say: "I haven't slept last night"? If not, why have I been told that we use present perfect for actions that have present effects?
7
votes
3answers
45k views

“I just ate them” and “I've just eaten them” — What's the difference in American and in British?

I know there are differences between American and British English in this area. So when answering, please specify whether you speak American or British English.
13
votes
6answers
42k views

“I have never said” versus “I never said”

I have never said this. I never said this. Is the usage of have in the first sentence justified or grammatically correct? What is the difference in meaning? When should I use one form over the ...