Linked Questions

8
votes
8answers
9k views

Word for someone who acts like an expert but who has very little knowledge?

What is a word to describe an individual who acts like an expert in a subject area, constantly stating facts and correcting people, but who actually has very little knowledge on the subject?
10
votes
3answers
4k views

What are the criteria to adopt new words into English?

Long time no see is a typical example for Chinglish, though it is said that long time no see has been accepted by the mainstream English speakers. Recently, there is a neologism movement in the ...
12
votes
3answers
2k views

“Mx” the gender-neutral honorific

The gender-neutral honorific “Mx” has its own entry in the OED since August 2015, so no one can argue it doesn't exist. According to The Sunday Times, central and local governments have been quietly ...
4
votes
1answer
5k views

Is “groak” a new verb?

In the urban dictionary, I read Groak : Verb. To stare silently at someone while they are eating, in the hopes that they will give you some of their food. Always careful not to establish eye ...
4
votes
5answers
54k views

1 o'clock in the morning OR 1 o'clock at night?

Could you help me on this? In my native language I would speak about the "night" starting from around 11 pm till 4 in the morning. So every time I see an English phrase like "2 o'clock in the morning" ...
6
votes
3answers
2k views

Is logicalness a valid word and if not what word can be used instead?

I've never heard anyone use the word logicalness, however, it is listed in some online dictionaries (1, 2, 3), but not others (4). If it is not a word, what word can be used instead?
1
vote
1answer
8k views

Non-existing or nonexisting [closed]

What is correct in English, non-existing or nonexisting? Searching sources on Google doesn't help much as both variants are widely present there. Onelook Dictionary Search doesn't show much about ...
1
vote
3answers
6k views

When does a word become a 'word'? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Creating a new word The rule of thumb used to be that when a word hit the Oxford Dictionary, it was considered to be an accepted word - this, however, seems to have ...
0
votes
4answers
2k views

Is “subjugative” a word?

I recently used the word subjugative in the following sentence: Any company that wants to be “legitimate” (raise money, hire employees, file taxes, distribute shares, etc.) puts itself in a ...
2
votes
4answers
1k views

Is “rejectance” a proper / legitimate word?

Is rejectance an actual word that is interchangeable with rejection? I have not found it in any of the dictionaries available to me. I heard this word from a startup owner, who said the phrase: "...
-4
votes
1answer
406 views

Why do online dictionaries not include a definition for the phrase “Thanks a mint”? [closed]

Granted, "Thanks a mint" is an old timey phrase from when people said quaint things like 23 skidoo. But search engines do return instances of people still using the phrase, and the Google question ...
0
votes
1answer
129 views

Is “prayerlike” a word? [closed]

It's included the Merriam-Webster dictionary. I'm just curious if it is acknowledged as a proper form of "prayer."