Linked Questions

2
votes
1answer
3k views

Is just “no.” a valid sentence? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Shortest complete sentence in English I seem to remember (back in the day) being taught sentences must have an object and an action and that the shortest possible was ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Verbless sentence [duplicate]

I thought I heard my teacher said: 'Don't construct a sentence without a verb.' Is there such rule in english grammar? She looks like 70 years old. Perhaps older. How about the question above? Is ...
0
votes
0answers
143 views

Is “Agreed.” a complete and correct sentence? [duplicate]

Is it correct to write, Agreed. instead of, I agree. I am confused by this single-word sentence. Why is it in the past tense? Or is "Agreed" a (past-participle) adjective, like "Gone" or "...
5
votes
6answers
100k views

Forming valid one word sentences

I remember my English teacher saying that there are only two valid ways to make a one-word sentence: A question: Why? Where? A command: Go! Stop! Is this correct?
4
votes
9answers
4k views

Commutative, or “semantically palindromic” sentences

Being a mathematician with mathematician friends, my friends and I occasionally like to joke about the peculiarities of the English language. This one came up recently: Obviously, most English ...
4
votes
3answers
11k views

Are commands complete sentences?

This question seems to indirectly ask the question, but the upvoted answer says "the actual sentence is...". So my question is this: Are commands considered to be grammatically sound, complete ...
1
vote
3answers
15k views

Is “No” a complete sentence [closed]

I'm aware No is what is called a "sentence word". Does that mean that on its own, it is a "complete sentence"? Please state the reason for your answer, i.e. do not simply answer "Yes" or "No"
2
votes
4answers
630 views

Does standard English include non-trivial sentences which admit no verb?

One of the interesting aspects of the Maori language, as I understand it, is that it includes a class of sentences which not only have no verb, it is positively wrong to form them with a verb. Does ...
3
votes
1answer
4k views

What are the grammatical parts of “You idiot!”?

I've heard native English speakers say "You idiot!". However, is it considered grammatically correct? If so, what are the grammatical parts?
4
votes
1answer
363 views

Is the object in “Eighty-six forty-five.” a proper noun?

The object in the sentence "Eighty-six forty-five." refers to the 45th president of the US, as in Bush 41 vs. Bush 43. The meaning of the verb eighty-six – eject, bar, reject, discard, cancel (...
-1
votes
1answer
387 views

Is a “sentence” with just a subject and a verb really a sentence? [closed]

Is "I say" a sentence? It has a subject and a verb, but it doesn't seem like it is a sentence.