Linked Questions

0 votes
1 answer
298 views

In a car or on a car? [closed]

I know that normally we say travel by car or in a car, but would it be acceptable to say 'on a car'?
Anastasia's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
124 views

"When travelling in Australia, guidance is advised." [closed]

Is the following sentence grammatically correct? "When travelling in Australia, guidance is advised." It seems to me the subject is not matching the verb, as if "guidance is travelling".
Chong Lip Phang's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
2k views

preposition confusion in or on [duplicate]

I heard a person say " there is no room on the bus ". It for some reason sounded incorrect. However the most basic argument that we hear is that if it is a public transport, we use "on" but buses also ...
Utkarsha Tiwari's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
21k views

Get onto/ into the train [duplicate]

I know "to get onto the train", but is it correct to say "to get into the train"? If so, when do we have to use it?
Sanjar Igamov's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
143 views

Why is a person 'on' public transport and not 'in' it [duplicate]

A friend of mine recently posted a comment on Facebook saying that the phrase "on a train" is a pet peeve of his since it very rarely refers to somebody literally riding on top of a train. This got ...
James O'Neill's user avatar
0 votes
5 answers
2k views

Does one work in or on an aeroplane?

In an exam paper, there was a picture of an air stewardess in the aeroplane serving passengers. One of my pupils wrote the following: The air stewardess works on an aeroplane. Shouldn't it be ...
Doreen's user avatar
  • 11
5 votes
2 answers
10k views

Why are you "On a train" yet "In a car" when you are inside both vehicles? [duplicate]

Why are you "On a train" yet "In a car" when you are inside both vehicles? "On a bike" makes sense but "On a plane" seems wrong as you are actually inside the plane rather than on it.
Aaron's user avatar
  • 745
-1 votes
1 answer
127 views

Grammaticality of "by the bus" when the bus is the only choice

Can the expression "by the bus" be used to specify how I go home when it is the only method to be used?
user35828's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
13k views

Get in vs. get on [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Origin/reason for the expression “on the bus” instead of “in the bus” I'm an EFL (English as a foreign language) teacher and I haven't been able to come up with a good ...
Scott Severance's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
915 views

Can we really "get in" or "get on" a thing? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Origin/reason for the expression “on the bus” instead of “in the bus” Can we really "get in a bus" or "get on a bus" in Standard English usage?
user26555's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
156k views

what is the difference between " get in the bus" and " get on the bus" [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Origin/reason for the expression “on the bus” instead of “in the bus” I want to know when to use " get in the bus." and " get on the bus." I will thank ...
박용현's user avatar
  • 809
2 votes
3 answers
4k views

Is it correct to use "on" with the meaning of "inside"?

I was wondering if it is correct to use "on" meaning that something is on (inside) something else. For example: There is a book on the drawer If it is wrong, it is correct to use "in" instead?
Donovan's user avatar
  • 123
9 votes
1 answer
1k views

Is there a rule in preposition-using?

Like the title, I randomly checked my son's textbook one day and found out some interesting things, like: "I'm on a bus," "I'm in a car," "I'm on a scooter," "I'm on a skateboard," "I'm on a bike," ...
Daisy's user avatar
  • 761
29 votes
1 answer
35k views

When should I use "in" or "on"?

As it is common with people from my country, I have an immense difficulty with prepositions in English, especially with the use of in and on. When the preposition indicates the position of the ...
Vivi's user avatar
  • 1,407