Linked Questions

2
votes
2answers
6k views

Are 'should' and 'be supposed to' interchangeable? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why do we say “supposed to” for “should have”? I guess I really can't tell if 'should' and 'be supposed to' are interchangeable from the definitions of ...
60
votes
10answers
30k views

When should I use “shall” versus “will”?

Which is the correct use of these two words, and in which context should one be used rather than the other?
17
votes
8answers
23k views

Logical meaning of the word “understand”

To understand something means to be aquainted with it, to know it very well, know how it "ticks". This is one of the basic words that has a direct "meaning" in mind. However, if we "dissect" it, is ...
14
votes
3answers
197k views

“supposed to” or “suppose to”?

What is the actual spelling/pronunciation? What is the origination of this phrase?
19
votes
3answers
61k views

“Sick” or “ill”?

If I'm not healthy, am I sick or am I ill? Are these interchangeable, or do they merely overlap?
21
votes
6answers
19k views

When should one use “should” and when should one use “must”?

I tend to use should when it's a suggestion I don't have a strong opinion on, i.e. it could be done in many other ways than the one I'm suggesting and it can still happen. You should stop by that ...
27
votes
4answers
7k views

Pronunciation of “have” in “I don't have to” [do something]

Normally when I say "I don't have to do that" (meaning I'm not obliged to), I find that as well as putting heavy stress on the word "have", I pronounce if haff. Is this common? If so, why does the ...
13
votes
3answers
6k views

How do I ask a question politely?

When I was growing up, if I ever said something similar to "Can I go to the store with Joe?", my mom would correct me with "May I go to the store with Joe?". Is "May I?" the typical way to ask a ...
5
votes
2answers
121k views

What is the difference between “have to”, “must”, and “should”? [duplicate]

Is there any difference between have to”, “must”, and “should”? If there is some difference between them, when do I have to use (nor not use) each of the constructions below? have to do something ...
7
votes
2answers
149k views

“Expected of” vs. “expected from”

It is expected of/from you to find the solution. Such rude behavior was not expected of/from you. I am quite sure that from is the correct usage in both cases, but of could be used in the first ...
5
votes
2answers
15k views

Modal vs Non-Modal vs Auxiliary modal vs Conjugated Verb

Modal vs Non-Modal vs Auxiliary modal vs Conjugated Verb How are these kinds of verb related to each other? Specially Non-Modals and Conjugated Verb. Is the "Auxiliary modal" just another name for "...
5
votes
5answers
10k views

What is the meaning of “ought not”?

Consider this example: A few strong branches over water reach for what they ought not reach. Which of the meanings comes closest to “ought not” in this sentence? Is it “doesn't have to”, “should ...
6
votes
2answers
3k views

Is “will never have been” valid English?

I was reading this phrase "will never have been" and I was wondering what grammatical structure does it belong to / is it grammatical? I'm not sure why but it sounds weird. What is the difference ...
6
votes
2answers
12k views

“could have” vs “could”

We say that could is sometimes the past of can. If that's true then why can't we use it in the following context. They didn't let us. We could walk. Instead we say: They didn't let us. We could ...
4
votes
2answers
3k views

Is this expression correct “Don't worry about it; it is supposed be one of the features of this year's release”

I have always been little confused regarding the use of supposed to. One meaning I am clear on is "obligation," another one is "a theory/concept accepted by a group of people," as in This restaurant ...

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