Linked Questions

16
votes
4answers
1k views

Why can I contract *across* a word, skipping the word in the middle? [duplicate]

I wrote this sentence: Why wouldn't it be valid? --and I realized that without the contraction it becomes: Why would it not be valid? As opposed to "why would not it be valid," as the ...
0
votes
1answer
301 views

Negative questions [duplicate]

I am in a trouble when I have to ask a question with negative verbs like: Cannot we do the test? Will not we do the test ? Are the sentences above correct?
-1
votes
1answer
272 views

Why are many English contractions considered okay to use in contraction-form, but believed to “sound wrong” when used individually? [duplicate]

Some popular examples: Don't you know any better? Now use that with out the contractions: Do not you know any better? Want to bet that many English speakers would find this weird or wrong sounding?...
1
vote
0answers
136 views

“What doesn't she know how to cook” vs. “What does not she know how to cook” [duplicate]

Which of the following is correct? If A is correct why is B incorrect? I am stumped, This sentence has popped up in my Hong Kong English class, don't know how to sort it out. Why does the one ...
34
votes
4answers
67k views

Why do we say INcomplete but UNcompleted?

I'm a native speaker and it's just occurred to me that this is a strange irregularity: "The work is incomplete." < Fine "The work is uncompleted." < Less common but still ...
14
votes
4answers
110k views

“Do you not” vs. “Don't you”

I live in the UK and I mostly hear people saying Don't you..., but some people say: Do you not...? What is the difference and which one is more correct? You can put any example really. Something like:...
11
votes
4answers
30k views

Why does “Why doesn't it work?” become “Why does it not work?”

When you uncontract doesn't in "Why doesn't it work?" the not moves to "Why does it not work?" This confuses me even more when I use a longer phrase instead of the pronoun it like below: Why doesn'...
-3
votes
1answer
2k views

Is “aren't you too old to be…” proper grammar? [duplicate]

My reasoning is that aren't stands for are not so the sentence would read are not you too old to be... which is not proper grammar.
3
votes
3answers
467 views

Where did the DO NOT come from?

Certainly in other languages like my native Swedish, a negative is expressed with the verb followed by not. Jag pratar inte Svenska = I speak not Swedish = I do not speak Swedish In English, however,...
1
vote
2answers
295 views

Shouldn't vs should not usage

I have heard many people say 'shouldn't it be ...' when correcting someone but today I was writing a formal email and I did not want to use any shorthand notation so I tried to expand it as 'should ...
0
votes
0answers
18 views

General verb have with not

I got this sentence from the book of "At Lincoln's Side: John Hay's Civil War Correspondence and Selected Writings". There were few who had not a story worth listening to. I think did not have is ...